Community news

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That lake is 1. as used in speleology, a body of standing water too deep to walk across [10]. 2. in caving, a body of standing water in a cave, but used for what would be called a pond or pool on the surface [25]. 3. a body of fresh inland water [16].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

What is Karstbase?

Search KARSTBASE:

keyword
author

Browse Speleogenesis Issues:

KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
See all featured articles from other geoscience journals

International Journal of Speleology, 2012, Vol 41, Issue 1, p. 9-16
Swimming performance of epigeal and hypogeal species of Characidae, with an emphasis on the troglobiotic Stygichthys typhlops Brittan & Böhlke, 1965
Abstract:

Swimming performance of fish constitutes a good ecophysiological tool to evaluate the ability of species to use different types of habitats. In order to understand how the swimming performance is related to the hydraulic environment, we compared the critical velocity of five fish (Characidae): Stygichthys typhlops (groundwater troglobiotic); Piabina argentea and Bryconamericus stramineus (riverine); Hemigrammus marginatus (generalist, found in rivers and floodplains) and Psellogrammus kennedyi (lacustrine). Swimming speed tests were performed in a respirometer-type apparatus. Total body length was the variable that best explained the maximum speed attained by all species under study. The critical swimming speed values (in body lengths per second) for each species were as follows: P. argentea (13.75); B. stramineus (9.32); H. marginatus (6.32); P. kennedyi (4.00); and lower in hypogean species, S. typhlops (3.31). All data of this study suggest a strong correlation between swimming performance and the hydraulic environment in which the species are found. The riverine, generalist and lacustrine species (the troglobiotic being included in the last group) showed a trend toward a decrease in speed.