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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That dissolution of limestone is the solubility of calcite (and hence of limestone) in pure water is very low, but is vastly increased in the presence of carbon dioxide. this gas, dissolved in the water to produce carbonic acid, permits dissociation of calcium carbonate, and dissolution rates and loads are therefore directly related to carbon dioxide content. this accounts for the importance to limestone dissolution of plant growth; soil water contains greatly more carbon dioxide than stream waters. further dissolution occurs due to mixing of saturated waters of different carbon dioxide content (see mischungskorrosion), because of a nonlinear relationship between carbonate saturation and carbon dioxide content. this process is of major significance to continued dissolution within the phreas. cold water can dissolve more carbon dioxide but, with respect to cave development, this climatic factor is overwhelmed by the higher organic activity producing more carbon dioxide in warmer environments. loss of carbon dioxide, by diffusion into open air, causes water to precipitate calcite as speleothems. limestone dissolution may also be achieved by organic acids or by strong acids, particularly sulphuric acid, though such effects are normally far less than that of carbon dioxide. strong acid dissolution is probably involved in the inception of most underground drainage. dissolution by sulphuric acid formed by oxidation of sulfide minerals or gases may be a major cave-forming process in some regions, and was largely responsible for the enlargement of carlsbad caverns and lechuguilla cave, new mexico [9].?

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ISS-UIS
International Journal of Speleology, 1990, Vol 19, Issue 0, p. 29-0
Laboratory studies of predatory behaviour in two subspecies of the Carabid cave beetle: Neaphaenops tellkampfi.
Abstract:
Comparative studies on the foraging behaviour of Neaphaenops tellkampfi tellkampfi and N. t. meridionalis demonstrated adaptation to different environments. The southern subspecies N. t. meridionalis, which is found in wet muddy caves where cave cricket eggs are unlikely prey, did not locate buried cricket eggs and dug fewer and less accurate holes in the lab than the nominate subspecies. N. t. tellkampfi, which reaches high densities in sandy deep cave environments where cricket eggs are the only viable prey, gained significantly greater weight than meridionalis when presented buried cricket eggs as prey. There was no difference with respect to weight change between the subspecies in the presence of Ptomaphagus larvae. N. t. meridionalis gained weight at a significantly greater rate than the nominate subspecies with enchytraeid worms as prey. Enchytraeid worms represent the natural prey most likely to be encountered by N. t. meridionalis. 25% of beetle holes were dug deep enough to potentially located buried cricket eggs. Since Hubbell and Nortons' morphological data on the relationship between cricket ovipositor length and beetle predation have some problems with sample sizes and minor assumptions I conclude that there are no unequivocal data that support the possibility of coevolution between Neaphaenops and Hadenoecus.