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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That cave-in is 1. the collapse of the ceiling or side walls of a cave or of the land surface into a subterranean passage as a result of undermining or of pressure from above [10]. 2. the partial or complete collapse of earth material into a large underground opening, such as an excavation or a mine. 3. the sudden slumping of wall material into a pit. 4. a place where material has collapsed or fallen in or down.?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
Engineering challenges in Karst, Stevanović, Zoran; Milanović, Petar
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Geochemical and mineralogical fingerprints to distinguish the exploited ferruginous mineralisations of Grotta della Monaca (Calabria, Italy), Dimuccio, L.A.; Rodrigues, N.; Larocca, F.; Pratas, J.; Amado, A.M.; Batista de Carvalho, L.A.
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
See all featured articles from other geoscience journals

C/O RIVISTA ITALIANA PALEONTOLOGIA STRATIGRAFIA, VIA MANGIAGALLI, 34, 20133 MILANO, ITALY
Rivista Italiana Di Paleontologia E Stratigrafia, 2003, Vol 109, Issue 2, p. 159-171
Lower carboniferous (late Visean) platform development and cyclicity in southern Ireland: Foraminiferal biofacies and lithofacies evidence
Abstract:
The stratigraphy of several well exposed late Visean carbonate successions in southern Ireland have been correlated using high resolution foraminiferal/algal biostratigraphy and detailed biofacies analysis. This study has revealed that during the lower late Visean (early Asbian) time platform mudbank and intrabank facies were deposited on a rimmed ramp that dipped southward. By upper late Visean (late Asbian to Brigantian) time, well bedded carbonates were deposited on a shallow, unrimmed platform expanse that prograded southward through a series of shallowing-upward minor cycles. Within the late Asbian successions numerous minor cycles (2-15 m thick) occur that contain distinctive lithofacies and three distinct foraminiferal biofacies. The top of these cycles can usually be identified by palaeokarst surfaces with relief of to 0.5 m associated with pedogenic features and fissures indicating initial palaeocave-forming processes. Deposits on these emergent boundary surfaces include thick palaeosols (up to I in thick) and eroded boulders of the underlying karst surfaces. The lower transgressive facies of each minor cycle often began with the deposition of shallow-water, subtidal, algal-rich limestone containing diverse foraminiferal biofacies (Biofacies type 2). New foraminiferal taxa may appear in this part of the cycle. Towards the middle part of each cycle deeper water, subtidal, foraminiferal biofacies occur, but with no significant first appearance data. The biofacies at this level in the cycle are often algal-poor limestone rich in bryozoans or crinoids (Biofacies type 1). Biostratigraphically important foraminiferal taxa often first appear or reappear in low diversity assemblages toward the top of most cycles in shallower water grainstone microfacies (Biofacies type 3) rich in dasycladacean algae