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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That francoanellite is a cave mineral - h6k3al5(po4)8 .13h2o [11].?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for alluvium (Keyword) returned 23 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 23
The dynamics of population in the Isopod Proasellus slavus ssp.n. and the larvae of Chironomids in the hyporheic water of the river Drava with regard to pollution., 1976, Lattingerpenko Romana, Mestrov Milan, Tavcar Vlatka
If we sum up the data and observations derived from our researches on the Drava river, we conclude after consideration of surface water fauna and after comparison of chemical parameters that it influences the hyporheic water of a rough gravel-sandy alluvium more than 2 m deep, while in the compact sandy substratum it has less influence. The next conclusion is that the horizontal and vertical distribution of Proasellus slavus ssp.n. in the alluvium of the Drava river, depends upon the granulation of substratum, with reference so the largeness of interstices; that the populations vary in density and structure according to the nature of water which irrigates these alluviums; and finally upon the quantity of detritus which this water contains. Concerning the influence of the sewage waters the effect of a sudden action of very polluted water is not known but it is certain that the increasing of decaying material to the alfa-meso saprobial level of the river water does not threaten either the existence or the development of the populations of Proasellus slavus ssp.n.

Karst Geomorphology and Hydrology of Gunung Tempurung, Perak, Malaysia, 1995, Gilleson David , Holland Ernst , Davies Gareth

Gunung Tempurung is a 600-metre high limestone tower in the Kinta Valley located to the south of the city of Ipoh, Malaysia. The tower contains at least one extensive cave system, Gua Tempurung, which has a length of approximately 4800 metres and a vertical range of about 200 metres. The tower is an erosional remnant of a thick sequence of Silurian - Permian Limestones initially formed as a shelf deposit near an ancient coastline. The carbonate rocks lie adjacent to, and are laterally bounded by, Late Mesozoic granite plutoniic rocks emplaced by activity related to the Late Triassic uplift from plate boundary stresses along the western edge of the Malay Peninsular. The limestones have been folded and compressed between the granites and have been altered by contact metamorphism to marbles and skarn. Hydrothermal mineralisation of the limestone host rock has yeilded deposits of tin, with some tungsten minerals and other minor ores. In the central part of the karst tower a river-cave system, Gua Tempurung, developed from local damming of the north and south outlets of a small catchment derived from the granite upland area to the east. In several locations inside the dry upper chambers of the cave, vein deposits of tin (cassiterite) are evident in walls and ceilings. Additionally alluvial tin deposits derived from the Old Alluvium are present in the cave.


Presence of Rare-Earth Elements in Black Ferromanganese Coatings from V?ntului Cave (Romania), 1997, Onac, B. P. , Pedersen, R. B. , Tysseland, M.
This study examines the rare-earth elements (REEs) found in ferromanganese coatings covering both sandy alluvium and submerged boulders in an underground stream from V?ntului Cave, Romania. The black ferromanganese sediments are mainly composed of birnessite and other poorly-crystallized manganese oxide and hydroxides (pyrolusite, romanechite, todorokite, rhodochrosite) as well as goethite and kaolinite. Scanning electron microscope and EDX analyses performed on the black ferromanganese sediments show the material to have concentrated considerable amounts of REEs (La, Ce, Sm, Nd) in iron-rich spheres that build up botryoidal-like aggregates. The correlation of 143Nd/144Nd ratio for 6 different samples indicates that the REEs were concentrated in the cave environment after being leached from bauxitic and red residual clays from above the cave. Based on our observations, we conclude that an increase in pH resulted in adsorption of REE onto the surface of ferromanganese minerals. This study demonstrates the potential of using Nd isotopes as a tool for paleochemistry studies of the cave environment.

Richard Lake, an evaporite-karst depression in the Holbrook basin, Arizona, 1997, Neal J. T. , Colpitts R. M. ,
Richard Lake is a circular depression 35 km SE of Winslow, Arizona, about 1.6 km wide and with topographic closure of 15-23 m. The depression is 5 km south of McCauley Sinks, another depressed area about 2 km wide which contains some 40 large sinkholes. Richard Lake formerly contained water after heavy rains prior to headwater drainage modification but is now dry most of the time. It is situated within the Moenkopi / Kaibab outcrop belt with Coconino Sandstone at shallow depth near the southwestern margin of the subsurface Permian evaporite deposit in the Holbrook Basin. Outcropping strata are predominantly limestone, but the salt-karst features result from collapse of these units into salt-dissolution cavities developed in the Corduroy Member of the Schnebly Hill Formation of the Sedona Group (formerly called the Supai Salt) that underlies the Coconino. Richard Lake is interpreted as a collapse depression containing concentric faults, pressure ridges, and a 200m wide sinkhole in the center. A second set of pressure ridges parallels the axis of the nearby western end of the Holbrook Anticline, trending generally N 30 degrees W. In the alluvium at the bottom of the central sinkhole, two secondary piping drain holes were observed in early 1996. Northwest-trending fissures also were observed on the depression flanks, essentially parallel to the regional structure. The presence of Richard Lake amidst the preponderance of salt-karst features along the Holbrook Anticline suggests a similar origin by salt dissolution, but with distinct manifestation resulting from variation in overburden thick?less and consolidation. Similarities of origin between Richard Lake and McCauley Sinks seem likely, because of their similar geological setting, size, appearance, and proximity. Two lesser developed depressions of smaller dimensions occur in tandem immediately west along a N 62 degrees W azimuth. Secondary sinkholes occur within each of these depressions, as at Richard Lake. Breccia pipes are apt to be found beneath all of these structures

Sinkholes, soils, fractures, and drainage: Interstate 70 near Frederick, Maryland, 1997, Boyer Bw,
Numerous sinkholes have recently formed on both sides of Interstate 70 south of Frederick, Maryland, All the sinkholes are cover-collapse types, which form when soil cavities grow upward from the bedrock surface until their roofs become unstable, Areas at greatest risk for sinkhole development lie within a network of dry swales, The roughly dendritic map pattern and presence of allochthonous siliciclastic alluvium suggest that these swales are the vestiges of a vanished surface drainage system. Sinkholes occur mainly along bedrock escarpments underlying the swales, which are located along an easterly-trending transverse fracture and a series of strike-parallel fractures which intersect with it. Although the surface drainage appears to have Bowed east and north in the past, surface runoff in large quantities is infiltrating the ground or directly entering some of the sinkholes, then following subsurface conduits which convey it southward under the highway. Compaction grouting has been employed to prevent collapse or further subsidence of the most threatened portions of the highway. Soil Survey maps can be useful in locating cryptic intermittent or relict drainage pathways which may be at high risk for sinkhole formation when subjected to anthropogenic concentrations of perched storm water

An example of identifying karst groundwater flow, 1998, Stevanovic Z. , Dragisic V. ,
Hydrogeological investigations for the purpose of regulating the karst aquifer were carried out in the mountain massif of Kucaj in the Carpatho-Balkan range of eastern Serbia. Different geo-physical methods were applied in order to identify the position of karstified zones with active circulation of karst underground streams. Especially good results were obtained by using the spontaneous potential method for the exploration and construction of boreholes and wells. In the valleys of Crni Timok and Radovanska reka the measurements have been carried out upstream along the whole width of the alluvium to the limestone periphery. A number of positive and negative anomalies have been recorded. In the centres of positive anomalies several boreholes were located: HG-19 (centre of anomaly 30 mV, total length of the biggest cavern is 9 m); HG-1 ( mV, cavern of 2m); HG-15 (max, ? mV, effective cavernousness is 17%)

Geophysical Studies at Kartchner Caverns State Park, Arizona, 1999, Lange, A. L.
Geophysical studies over Kartchner Caverns State Park mapped structure and groundwater patterns beneath valley alluvium and determined the geophysical expression of the caverns at the surface. Three techniques were employed: electromagnetics (EM), gravity, and natural potential (NP). Electromagnetic traverses in the area failed to detect the voids, owing to the very low conductivity of the carbonate rock. On the other hand, the EM method succeeded in defining the boundary between carbonate rock and alluvium, and in detecting the high-conductivity underflow beneath the drainage system. Resolution of the gravity survey over outcrop was limited to ~0.1 mgal, due to severe terrain effects. Nevertheless, two of the three major cavern passages were expressed as gravity lows at the surface, and fifteen additional small gravity anomalies could be the effect of fracture zones or unexposed caves. East of the carbonate block, the gravity profiles delineated the range-front fault and afforded interpretations of bedrock structure beneath valley fill. Natural-potential profiles, coincident with those of the gravity survey, produced a prominent compound anomaly over the mapped caverns. The 55 mV NP high was flanked by broad lows measuring ~15 mV over two of the main cavern galleries. The high was incised by a third low over a middle passage of the caverns. The lows are tentatively attributed to filtration downward toward the cave ceilings; the highs, to evapotranspiration from a deeper groundwater reservoir. Elsewhere over the outcrop, continuous NP trends are the likely expressions of faulting and fracturing, possibly accompanied by solution activity

The catchment of the Brassus karst spring (Swiss Jura): a synthesis of the tracer tests, 2000, Perrin J. , Jeannin P. Y. , Lavanchy Y. ,
Two successive tracer tests were carried out in the Pleine Lune cave which is located in the central part of the Brassus karstic spring catchment area (South-western Jura, Switzerland). During both experiments, the tracers were not recovered neither. at the Brassus spring nor at the secondary springs. Following this amazing result, the available data on this spring have been studied and a synthesis is proposed in this paper. The Brassus karstic spring, situated in the south-western part of Vallee de Joux, is an important resurgence from this part of the folded Jura. The water emerges from Cretaceous limestones covered by a thin layer of moraine: the main alimentation comes however from the underlying Maim limestone aquifer, Cretaceous limestones bring only a limited part of the total discharge. Within the supposed Brassus spring catchment areal 18 tracer tests were realised, but only half of them gave positive results. Positive tracer rests show low velocities and poor restitution percentage, particularly during low water periods. Such peculiarities are attributed to an important saturated zone, favouring dilution and dispersion of the tracers. The average discharge at the: spring is assumed to be less than 500 l/s and the average specific discharge is about 40 l/s/km(2), following previous data on other springs of the area. A calculated catchment area with such values would have a surface of 13,5 km(2); but the catchment area derived from the topography of the base of the Maim aquifer (top of the argovian marls considered as an aquitard) covers 56 km(2). This important difference as well as the negative results obtained from the Pleine Lune cave tracer tests show how difficult it is to define a catchment area for limestone aquifers: on one hand a delimitation based on water balance calculations tends to underestimate the catchment area by neglecting outlets as direct infiltration in the alluviums and secondary springs. On the other hand a delimitation based on geological considerations seems to overestimate the surface; this is illustrated by negative tracer tests results with injection points situated well inside the catchment area

The stratigraphical record and activity of evaporite dissolution subsidence in Spain, 2001, Gutierrez F. , Orti F. , Gutierrez M. , Perezgonzalez A. , Benito G. , Prieto J. G. , Valsero J. J. D. ,
The evaporite formations tin outcrop and at shallow depth) cover an extensive area of the Spanish territory. These soluble sediments are found in diverse geological domains and record a wide time span from the Triassic up to the present day. Broadly, the Mesozoic and Paleogene formations (Alpine cycle) are affected by compressional structures, whereas the Neogene (post-orogenic) sediments remain undeformed. The subsidence caused by subsurface dissolution of the evaporites (subjacent karst) takes place in three main types of stratigraphical settings: a) Subsidence affecting evaporite-bearing Mesozoic and Tertiary successions (interstratal karst); b) Subsidence in Quaternary alluvial deposits related to the exorheic evolution of the present-day fluvial systems (alluvial or mantled karst); c) Subsidence in exposed evaporites (uncovered karst). These types may be represented by paleosubsidence phenomena (synsedimentary and/or postsedimentary) recognizable in the stratigraphical record, or by equivalent currently active or modem examples with surface expression. The interstratal karstification of the Mesozoic marine evaporites and the consequent subsidence of the topstrata is revealed by stratiform collapse breccias and wedge-outs in the evaporites grading into unsoluble residues. In several Tertiary basins, the sediments overlying evaporites locally show synsedimentary and/or postsedimentary subsidence structures. The dissolution-induced subsidence coeval to sedimentation gives place to local thickenings in basin-like structures with convergent dips and cumulative wedge out systems. This sinking process controls the generation of depositional environments and lithofacies distribution. The postsedimentary subsidence produces a great variety of gravitational deformations in the Tertiary supra-evaporitic units including both ductile and brittle structures (flexures, synforms, fractures, collapse and brecciation). The Quaternary fluvial terrace deposits on evaporite sediments show anomalous thickenings (> 150 m) caused by a dissolution-induced subsidence process in the alluvial plain which is balanced by alluvial aggradation. The complex space and time evolution pattern of the paleosubsidence gives place to intricate and anarchical structures in the alluvium which may be erroneously interpreted as pure tectonic deformations. The current subsidence and generation of sinkholes due to suballuvial karstification constitutes a geohazard which affects to large densely populated areas endangering human safety and posing limitations to the development. An outstanding example corresponds to Calatayud historical city, where subsidence severely damages highly valuable monuments. The subsidence resulting from the underground karstification of evaporites has determined or influenced the generation of some important modem lacustrine basins like Gallocanta, Fuente de Piedra and Banyoles lakes. The sudden formation of sinkholes due to the collapse of cave roofs is relatively frequent in some evaporite outcrops. Very harmful and spectacular subsidence activity is currently occurring in the Cardona salt diapir where subsidence has been dramatically exacerbated by mining practices

Karst role in the formation of diamond placers of the Muno-Markhinskii interfluve (Yakutsk diamond-bearing province, Russia), 2001, Afanas'ev Vp, Zinchuk Nn, Pokhilenko Np, Krivonos Vf, Yanygin Yt,
The paper is devoted to the karst role in the formation of aureoles of kimberlite indicator minerals (KIM) and diamond placers in the modern alluvium of the Muna-Markha interfluve. Its territory is open, i.e., the Lower Paleozoic rocks hosting kimberlites and kimberlites themselves are exposed on the surface. Widely developed karst depressions are demonstrated to be the main suppliers of KIM and diamonds to the watercourse alluvium. These karst depressions were filled with Jurassic sedimentary material with KIM concentrations, which was mixed with authigenic iron minerals, i.e., limonite, magnetite, and hematite. This interpretation explains the high contrast in KIM distribution; i.e., sites with extremely high KIM concentrations alternate with watercourse areas devoid of heavy minerals. The revealed role of karat in KIM aureole formation in the open areas required an alteration of the panning sampling scheme, which was significantly improved. The kimberlite bodies of the Nakyn field located under the Jurassic sedimentary cover to the cast from the Muna-Markha al ea, are accompanied by karst depressions. Some karst depressions in the open areas may also he associated with kimberlites. Therefore, the detailed study of karst and the comprehensive interpretation of magnetic anomalies are necessary for the discovery of kimberlite bodies. Most of these anomalies are: produced hy karat structures

Notion and forms of contact karst, 2001, Gams, Ivan

These forms are through valley, blind valley, karst plain, cave with allogenic river, overflow polje, cave on the impermeable rock, subglacial karst and interstratal karst. Emphasized is the role of climate and alluvium for closed basins by comparing Wombeyan cave area in Australia with polje Velo polje in Julian Alps (Slovenia). In the temperate humid alpine climate is intensive mechanical weathering on the steep and bare slopes above Velo polje (1680 m) and steep dry valley rising up to 2200 m. After heavy downpour the periodical brook Velski potok is sinking on the 400 m wide bottom and depositing new sheet of rubble, sand and organic particles. This process lasted since last glacier retreat 9 - 10,000 years ago. Despite age of many hundred million years and confluence of two rivers from surroundings built of igneous rocks on southern corner of 3,6 km2 large isolated Wombeyan marble there prevail gorges, caves and narrow valleys without large alluviated bottoms, and the surface is not levelled. The main reasons for the difference are in this view the semi-arid climate and the absence of alluvium causing larger and longer moist contact of alluvium with limestone basis.


Paleosubsidence and active subsidence due to evaporite dissolution in Spain, 2002, Gutierrez F. , Orti F. , Gutierrez M. , Perezgonzalez A. , Benito G. , Gracia F. J. , Duran J. J. ,
Evaporite formations crop out or are at shallow depth present in an extensive area of Spain. These soluble sediments occur in diverse geological domains and were deposited over a long time span, from the Triassic up to the present day. Broadly, the Mesozoic and Paleogene formations (Alpine cycle) are affected by compressional structures, whereas the Neogene (post-orogenic) sediments remain undeformed. Subsidence caused by subsurface dissolution of evaporites (subjacent karst) takes place in three main types of stratigraphic settings: a) subsidence affecting evaporite-bearing Mesozoic and Tertiary successions (interstratal karst); b) subsidence in Quaternary alluvial deposits related to the exorheic evolution of present-day fluvial systems (alluvial or mantled karst); and c) subsidence in exposed evaporites (uncovered karst). These types may be represented by paleosubsidence phenomena (synsedimentary and/or postsedimentary) recognizable in the stratigraphic record, or by equivalent, currently active or modem examples which have a surface expression. Interstratal karstification of Mesozoic marine evaporites, and the consequent subsidence of overlying strata, is revealed by stratiform collapse breccias and wedge outs of the evaporites grading into unsoluble residues. In several Tertiary basins, the sediments overlying evaporites locally show synsedimentary and/or postsedimentary subsidence structures. Dissolution-induced subsidence coeval with sedimentation is accompanied by local thickening of strata in basin-like structures with convergent dips and cumulative wedge-out systems. This sinking process controls the generation of depositional environments and lithofacies distribution. Postsedimentary subsidence produces a great variety of gravitational deformations in Tertiary supra-evaporitic units, including both ductile and brittle structures (flexures, synforms, fractures, collapse, and brecciation). Quaternary fluvial terrace deposits overlying evaporites show anomalous thickenings (>150 m) caused by a dissolution-induced subsidence process in the alluvial plain, which is balanced by alluvial aggradation. The complex evolution (in time and space) of paleosubsidence leads to intricate and chaotic structures in the alluvium, which may be erroneously interpreted as pure tectonic deformations. The current subsidence and generation of sinkholes due to suballuvial karstification constitutes a geohazard which affects large, densely populated areas, and thus endangers human safety and poses limitations on development. An outstanding example can be seen in Calatayud, an important historical city where subsidence has severely damaged highly valuable monuments. Subsidence resulting from the underground karstification of evaporites has caused or influenced the generation of some important modem lacustrine basins, such as Gallocanta, Fuente de Piedra, and Banyoles Lakes. The sudden formation of sinkholes due to collapse of cave roofs is fairly frequent in some evaporite outcrops. Very harmful and spectacular subsidence activity is currently occurring in the Cardona salt diapir, where subsidence has been dramatically exacerbated by mining practices

Transport of suspended solids from a karstic to an alluvial aquifer: the role of the karst/alluvium interface., 2002, Massei N. , Lacroix M. , Wang H. Q. , Mahler B. J. , Dupont J. P.

Transport of suspended solids from a karstic to an alluvial aquifer: the role of the karst/alluvium interface, 2002, Massei N. , Lacroix M. , Wang H. Q. , Mahler B. J. , Dupont J. P. ,
This study focuses on the coupled transport of dissolved constituents and particulates, from their infiltration on a Karst plateau to their discharge from a karst spring and their arrival at a well in an alluvial plain, Particulate markers were identified and the transport of solids was characterised in situ in porous and karstic media, based on particle size analyses, SEM, and traces. Transport from the sinkhole to the spring appeared to be dominated by flow through karst: particulate transport was apparently conservative between the two sites, and there was little difference in the overall character of the particle size distribution of the particulates infiltrating the sinkhole and of those discharging from the spring. Qualitatively, the mineralogy of the infiltrating and discharging material was similar, although at the spring an autochthonous contribution from die aquifer was noted (chalk particles eroded from the parent rock by weathering). In contrast, transport between the spring and the well appears to be affected by the overlying alluvium: particles in the water from the well, showed evidence of considerable size-sorting. Additionally, SEM images of the well samples showed the presence of particles originating from the overlying alluvial system; these particles were not found in samples from the sinkhole or the spring. The differences between the particulates discharging from the spring and the well indicate that the water pumped from the alluvial plain is coming from the Karst aquifer via the very transmissive, complex geologic interface between the underlying chalk formation and the gravel at the base of the overlying alluvial system. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved

The Effect of Darab Salt Dome on the Quality of Adjacent Karstic and Alluvium Aquifers (South of Iran), 2002, Sharafi A. , Raeisi E. , Farhoodi G.

Karstified carbonate formations are among the most important water resources in the south-central regions of Iran. If the karst water is not contaminated by salt domes, the electrical conductivity of water in the karst aquifer is less than 500 µS cm-1 in the south-center of Iran. The study area is located in the southern flank of Shahneshin-Milk anticline, 200 km east of Shiraz. This region is situated in the Zagros Thrust Zone. The Tarbur karstic formation (Late Campanian-Maastrichtian) is outcropped on the southern flank of the Shahneshin-Milk anticline which is underlain by the impermeable Radiolarite formation. The Darab salt dome outcrops inside the karstified Tarbur Formation. Several springs emerge from the Tarbur Formation. The quality of all springs is in the range of unpolluted karst water except for three springs which are located near the Darab salt dome. The electrical conductivity of these springs range from 1200 to 2000 µS cm-1. Part of the alluvium near the Darab salt dome is salt-marsh which is bounded by two channels. The electrical conductivity in the salt-marsh below the water table is about 1400 µS cm-1, and it reduces to 400 µS cm-1 at the lower depths. Run-off from the Darab salt dome and seepage from the channel with low quality water are probably the main reasons of salt-marsh development. A considerable amount of polluted Tarbur karst water does not flow towards the marshland because, firstly, most of the Tarbur karst water discharges from the springs, and secondly, the alluvium aquifer is not affected by polluted water at lower depths.


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