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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That spring, valley is springs occurring at valley sides where the water table intersects the land surface.?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Geochemical and mineralogical fingerprints to distinguish the exploited ferruginous mineralisations of Grotta della Monaca (Calabria, Italy), Dimuccio, L.A.; Rodrigues, N.; Larocca, F.; Pratas, J.; Amado, A.M.; Batista de Carvalho, L.A.
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
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Your search for cave breakdown (Keyword) returned 7 results for the whole karstbase:
Features of Cave Breakdown, 1949, Davies, William E.

The origin and development of Brucker Breakdown and the adjacent area, Mammoth Cave System, Kentucky. Masters Thesis, 1989, Blackeagle, Cory W.

The appearance and relationships of Brucker Breakdown and adjacent area, a portion ofthe Mammoth Cave System,implythatcomplex structural and hydrogeological factors affectected and/or controlled passage development. Detailed surveys include geographic, cartographic, lithologic, morphologic, stratigraphic, and paleoflow indicators. The five proposed scenarios were the following. Case 1: All (or most) of the passages were once continuous across the Brucker Breakdown void, which is a subsequent feature. Case Ia: The Brucker Breakdown void is a subsequentfeature whose development caused morphological changes in the pre-existing passages adjacent to it (traditional hypothesis). Case II: The passages converge toward or diverge from the Brucker Breakdown void, which acted as either a source or target of flow and is a primary feature. Case Ila: Several passages converge on the Brucker Breakdown void and fewer components depart from it, indicating that the Brucker Breakdown void is a primary feature and represented a local potentiometric low. Case lIb: Several passages diverge from the Brucker Breakdown void, and fewer components converge on it, indicating that the Brucker Breakdown void is a primary feature and represented a local potentiometric high. Of these, Case lib was found to most closely represent the situation presented by the data.

To perform this study, a detailed procedure was developed that, until this time, had not been established nor outlined in the literature. Once the area of study was chosen and defined, an extremely detailed cartographic and morphologic survey was performed that established both horizontal and vertical data points throughout the area. These data points were tied to existing transit surveys of the surface that linked the subsurface area to U.S. Geological Survey bench marks. The cartographic, geographic, and morphologic data were converted with computer aid to map form. The maps were then field-checked for accuracy. Comprehensive geological mapping surveys were executed. Multiple stratigraphic sections were described and measured in each passage segment, and these were tied to the vertical data points. Correlations were made between sections and were physically traced whenever conditions permitted. Speleothem dating information from prior research was obtained and correlated throughout the study area. Finally, important features and passage morphologies were documented photographically.


Patterns of collapse chambers in the endokarsts of Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain), 2000, Giné, S À, Ngel

A general overview on the patterns of collapse chambers in the karsts of Mallorca is presented. The great significance of single breakdown chambers and strings of large rooms as one of the major constituents of cave patterns is easy to recognize in the cave surveys of many Majorcan caves. Detailed mapping of several collapse features such as breakdown piles, sloped boulder floors, vault profiles, coalescence areas, boulder chokes and dome structures can yield useful information regarding description and better understanding of cave collapse patterns.


Sulfide-bearing palaeokarst deposits at Lune River Quarry, Ida Bay, Tasmania, 2001, Osborne R. A. L. , Cooper I. B. ,
The Lune River Quarry at ida Bay. Tasmania exposes numerous palaeokarst features developed in the Ordovician Gordon Limestone. These palaeokarst features contain carbonate and siliciclastic deposits probably representing Late Devonian to early Late Carboniferous and Late Carboniferous karstification and sedimentation. Five facies of palaeokarst deposits are recognised, namely megabreccia, graded-bedded carbonate, laminated sandstone/siltstone, diamictite/quartz-lithic sandstone and coarse crystalline calcite. Pyrite, dolomite and sphalerite were emplaced in the palaeokarst deposits after the Carboniferous. These deposits are probably associated with a phase of hydrothermal cave development in Exit Cave, which adjoins the quarry. Pyrite weathering accounts for the abundance of gypsum speleothems and cave breakdown in Exit Cave

Cave breakdown by vadose weathering, 2002, Osborne R. A. L.
Vadose weathering is a significant mechanism for initiating breakdown in caves. Vadose weathering of ore bodies, mineral veins, palaeokarst deposits, non-carbonate keystones and impure, altered or fractured bedrock, which is intersected by caves, will frequently result in breakdown. Breakdown is an active, ongoing process. Breakdown occurs throughout the vadose zone, and is not restricted to large diameter passages, or to cave ceilings. The surfaces of disarticulated blocks are commonly coated, rather than having fresh broken faces, and blocks continue to disintegrate after separating from the bedrock. Not only gypsum, but also hydromagnesite and aragonite are responsible for crystal wedging. It is impossible to study or identify potential breakdown foci by surface surveys alone, in-cave observation and mapping are essential.

Mechanisms of karst breakdown formation in the gypsum karst of the fore-Ural region, Russia (from observations in the Kungurskaja Cave), 2004, Andrejchuk V. N. , Klimchouk A. B.

The fore-Ural is a classical region of intrastratal gypsum karst. The intensive development of karst in the Permian gypsums and anhydrites causes numerous practical problems, the subsidence hazard being the most severe.
Mechanisms of karst breakdown formation were studied in detail in the Kunguskaya Cave area. The cave and its setting are characteristic to the region and, being a site of detailed stationary studies for many years, the cave represents a convenient location for various karst and speleological investigations.
Breakdown structures related to cavities of the Kungurskaya Cave type develop by two mechanisms: gravitational (sagging and fall-in of the ceilings of cavities) and filtrational/gravitational (crumbling and fall-in of the ceilings of vertical solution pipes, facilitated by percolation). The former implies upward stoping of the breakout roof and cessation of the process at some height above the floor of the cave due to complete infilling by fallen clasts. This mechanism cannot generate surface deformation where the overburden thickness exceeds a certain value. The latter mechanism implies that breakdown will almost inevitably express itself at the surface, most commonly as a sudden collapse, even where the thickness of the overburden is large. These mechanisms result in different appearance, distribution and further evolution of the respective surface forms, so that subsidence hazard assessment should be performed differently for these types of breakdown.
The conclusions reached by this study are representative for the region, although some of them bear more general validity for intrastratal karst conditions. This study underlines the ultimate importance of speleological investigations to the understanding of karst breakdown mechanisms.


Constraints on the geological history of the karst system in southern Missouri, U.S.A. provided by radiogenic, cosmogenic and physical/chemical characteristics of doline fill, 2004, Weary David J. , Harrison Richard W. , Wright Maria P. , Jacobson Robert B. , Pavich Milan J. , Mahan Shannon A. , Wronkiewicz David J.

The Ozark Plateaus region of southern Missouri is underlain by dominantly carbonate marine platform rocks of Paleozoic age. The region has been sub-aerially exposed since the late Paleozoic and is characterized by extensive karst. To better understand the geologic history of this regional karst system, we examined the stratigraphic record preserved in the fill of a large doline near the largest spring in the region. Samples of fill from natural exposures and drill core were analyzed using thermoluminescence (TL) and 10Be cosmogenic techniques, and the physical/chemical characteristics of the fill material were determined by visual inspection, X-ray analyses, and grain-size measurements. Drill-hole data indicate that the allochthonous doline fill is 36.3 m thick and rests on at least 15.6 m of cave breakdown and sediment. The doline fill is divisible into 7 zones. Analysis of 10Be concentrations suggest that the entire doline fill was derived from local residuum during the middle (Illinoian) to late Pleistocene (Wisconsinan). X-ray diffraction analyses of clays throughout the doline fill indicate that they consist of nearly equal amounts of kaolinite and illite, consistent with terrestrial weathering.


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