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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That ground-water system is a ground-water reservoir and its contained water. also, the collective hydrodynamical and geochemical processes at work in the reservoir [22].?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for central europe (Keyword) returned 29 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 29
Phreatische Fauna in Ljubljansko polje (Ljubljana-Ebene, Jugoslavien); ihre oekologische Verteilung und zoogeographische Beziehungen., 1981, Sket Boris, Velkovrh Franci
The phreatic basin of Ljubljansko polje (polje = plain, field) recharges its water supply mainly from the Sava river-bed and at a few other locations where connections with karstic subterranean waters might exist and only up to 15% from precipitation. An important zone of infiltration in the river-bed is the bottom and not the bank which is to a large extent watertight due to organic debris (rests of Sphaerotilus e.g.). The main water-body moves about 10 m/day, there are however some local jets with far higher speeds. Yearly amplitudes of water temperatures are high near the river but in the centre of the plain only a couple of centigrades. Oxygen saturation is in the open river-water 100%, dropping to 40-60% just 1 m into the phreatic. True stygopsammal animals are represented here only by a few species and specimen in spite of the fact, that the interstices in the gravel are mostly filled with finer sediments. Remarkable is also the scarcity of Nematodes and the near absence of Acarina (compare with Danielopol 1976). Only a few specimen of the river benthos (Chironomidae, Tipulidae, Leuctra supp., Baets spp.) penetrate the interstitial water (compare with Ruffo 1961, Danielopol 1976) and only Naididae are more frequent there. However, many epigean animals occur in interstitial waters in the periodically flooded gravel-banks; one can explain this with oscillations of the water level. Some epigean animals (creno- and troglophilic) are quite regularly represented in the phreatic near the river, but have not been found in the river-bed. The distribution of phreatic species within the studied water-body seems to be controlled mainly by the presence of food supplies and the consequent competition among species. The same is true for the speed of the water current and some other factors which are less easily defined. The characteristics of the substratum as well as O2-saturation and other characteristics of the water seem to have little influence on the fauna. The energetically (food-) rich neighbourhood of the river is inhabited by a number of species in quite dense populations while the central parts of the phreatic water body exhibit a great poverty of species and of specimen. However, some species live here, which don't occur in the presence of larger food supplies and of greater competition (Niphargus serbicus). The higher current speed seems to prevent settlement of some species (Cyclopoida, Proasellus deminutus) while some are bound to such habitats (Proasellus vulgaris). Some species exhibit a high degree of euryvalency inside the stygopsephale habitats (Niphargus longidactylus e.g.), while some are highly specialized. Some of them form dense populations (comparatively dense even in energetically poor places) while others exhibit even in most favourable conditions very low densities (Niphargus jovanovici multipennatus). The present fauna is zoogeographically very diverse. Some species are distributed throughout Europe; some reach from Central Europe to the borders of Dinaride Karst (Bogidiella albertimagni) and some even penetrate it (Trichodrilus pragensis, Acanthocyclops kiefer). Bogidiella semidenticulata. Niphargus pectinicauda, Hadziella deminuta seem to be limited to the higher reaches of the Sava River. All of the above mentioned animals live regularly in interstitial waters and only sporadically in karstic hypogean waters. Niphargus stygius is here the only animal of a certainly karstic provenience; inside the plain it is limited to a completely special habitat. It is very likely that the entire Proasellus-deminutusgroup has developed in interstitial waters of larger plains which are in contact with karstic areas; some species penetrated from the plains into the karst rather than the reverse. To the contrary (judging from the distribution of the genera) karstic waters seem to be the cradle of Hauffenia and Hadziella. Such a sharp delimitation between cave- and interstitial fauna resp. in this area is very noteworthy. Both faunas live here in abundance and in close contact. It is very probable that particularly high competition and specialization of both faunas, caused by their richness and diversity, prevent mixing of species.

BRIEF COMMUNICATION - ADDITIONAL CRANIAL REMAINS FROM VINDIJA-CAVE, CROATIA, 1994, Smith F. H. , Ahern J. C. ,
Two additional cranial specimens from Vindija cave, Croatia, are described. One specimen is a zygomatic, providing the first information about the midfacial anatomy of the Vindija hominids. The other specimen is a frontal/supraorbital torus fragment. Both specimens exhibit morphology typically associated with Neandertals. They derive from level G, and provide further indication that both the level G, and G, hominids at Vindija represent Neandertals. (C) 1994 Wiley-Liss, Inc

Searching for extinction/recovery gradients: the Frasnian-Famennian interval, Mokra Section, Moravia, central Europe, 1996, Cejchan P, Hladil J,
A series of ancient seafloors colonized by diverse organisms has been documented from the Upper Devonian rocks of the Western Mokra Quarry. Situated in the southern tectonic closure of the Moravian Karst, the Frasnian-Famennian shallow carbonate ramps exhibit both Rhenish and Ukrainian affinities. Reconstruction of palaeo-sea floor horizons results in a series of 28 quadrats sufficient for further evaluation. Eighty-five taxa involved were scrutinized for abundance, occupied area, skeletal mass production and biomass production. The aim of the study was to determine whether the observed sequence of quadrats can be distinguished from a random one, and to discover any possible unidimensional gradient as a latent control. Monte Carlo simulations and a graph theoretical approach were utilized. Although the raw data seemed chaotic, the simulations demonstrated the observed sequence is not random. A significant influence of a hidden control is thus suggested. Fifteen characteristics of quadrats (e.g. diversity, number of taxa, vertical stratification of community, number of patches) were utilized for final interpretation. The gradient reconstructed by TSP algorithm reveals a significant crisis within the uppermost part of the Amphipora-bearing limestone

From a conceptual model of karst hydrological systems to water-vulnerability mapping, 1999, Jeannin Py. , Zwahlen F. , Doerfliger N.
A conceptual model of karst hydrological systems is presented hereIt considers that water flows through four cascading subsystems: soils, epikarst, unsaturated zone, and saturated zoneThis model lead us to define four criteria which appear to be significant for intrinsic vulnerability assessment with respect to a spring or a well: characteristics of epikarst (E), characteristics of protective cover (P), recharge or infiltration type (I) and presence/absence of a well-developed conduit network (K)The method has proved to be adequate for karst in Central EuropeIn the future, it should be tested in other areas and compared to numerical approaches of karst systems

Interglacial Growth of Tufa in Croatia, 2000, Horvatincic Nada, Calic Romana, Geyh Mebus A. ,
Tufa samples from the Krka River area in Croatia were dated by 14C and 230Th/234U methods. The study area is situated in the karst region of the southern Dinarides. 14C ages of 40 tufa samples collected at the waterfalls coincide with the early Holocene interglaciation, up to 6000 14C yr B.P. Comparison of conventional 14C dates of Holocene tufa and those of speleothems in the Dinaric Karst shows that speleothem formation started several thousand years earlier than tufa growth. Samples of old tufa deposits from the Krka River (17) and Plitvice Lakes (12) area and speleothem samples from caves in Dinaric Karst (5) yield 34 230Th/234U dates, most of which cluster around interglacial marine [delta]18O stage 5 (21). Eight of 13 older dates belong to interglacial stages 7 and 9; only 5 dates fall within stage 6 and 8 glaciations. 230Th/234U dates of speleothems and tufa samples from central Europe have indicated that these were formed preferentially during warm and humid interglacial and interstadial periods, and it appears that this is true of southern Croatia as well. Stable isotope ([delta]13C, [delta]18O) analyses of 40 tufa samples from the Krka River area were compared with stable isotope analyses of tufa from the Plitvice Lakes area. The [delta]13C values for both locations are similar and range from -10 to -6[per mille sign], indicating similar conditions of tufa formation. A systematic difference between the [delta]18O values of tufa in these two areas reflects the regional distribution of the oxygen composition of precipitation

Engineering-geological problems in the Moravian karst, Czech Republic, 2001, Samalikova M. ,
The Moravian karst belongs to one of the famous karst regions in Central Europe. It is situated in Moravia in the eastern part of the Czech Republic. According to the geology it is of Devonian age and the main rocks are of different types of limestones. The process of karstification is still active. They are many caves with rich stalagmites and stalactites and Macocha abyss, the depth of which is 138.5 m. The underground Punkva River flows through the main part of the karst, forming beautiful underground lakes. Typical karst phenomena, such as sinkholes and deep canyons, may be observed on the surface of the terrain. Because of the karstification, water erosion and frost weathering, many steep unstable slopes and walls originated. To solve the stability from a geotechnical point of view is not easy. This requests a special engineering-geological knowledge and experience

Start of the last interglacial period at 135 ka: Evidence from a high Alpine speleothem, 2002, Spotl Christoph, Mangini Augusto, Frank Norbert, Eichstadter Rene, Burns Stephen J. ,
A detailed study of growth periods of a flowstone from Spannagel Cave in the Zillertal Alps (Austria) at [~]2500 m above sea level, a site highly sensitive to climate changes, offers unprecedented new insights into Pleistocene climate change in Central Europe. Flowstone sample SPA 52 has a high U content (to 116 ppm); analyses of this sample reveal that episodes of calcite deposition started at 204 {} 3 ka, 135 {} 1.2 ka, and 122 ka, suggesting that at these times, the mean air temperature at this high Alpine site was within 1.5 {degrees}C of the present-day condition. The beginning of growth at 135 ka corresponds to the ending of the last glaciation and is concordant with a midpoint age for the penultimate deglaciation at 135 {} 2.5 ka, as deduced from the absolutely dated oxygen isotope curve in sediments from the Bahamas, as well as with recent coral evidence from Barbados indicating a high sea level already by 135.8 {} 0.8 ka. This set of data supports evidence against Northern Hemisphere forcing of termination II, because the insolation maximum is at 127 ka

Cryogenic cave calcite from several Central European caves: age, carbon and oxygen isotopes and a genetic model, 2004, Zak Karel, Urban Jan, Cilek Vaclav, Hercman Helena,
Cryogenic cave calcite (CCC), formed by segregation of solutes during water freezing, was found in three Central European caves. This calcite type forms accumulations of loose calcite grains on cave floor. The calcite grains are of highly variable crystal morphology, and of sizes ranging from less than 1 mm to over 1 cm. The most typical feature is their accumulation as loose (uncemented) crystals. U-series dating indicates the formation of CCC in the studied caves during several climatic oscillations of the Weichselian (between 61 and 36 ka BP in the Chelsiowa Jama-Jaskinia Jaworznicka cave system in Poland, between 34 and 26 ka BP in the BUML Cave in the Czech Republic, and between 26 and 21 ka BP in the Stratenska Jaskyna cave system, Slovakia). At the time of CCC formation, the studied caves were lying in a periglacial zone.Detailed C and O stable isotope study of CCC samples revealed that slow water freezing under isotope equilibrium was the dominant formational process in the studied Polish and Czech caves. Significantly higher [delta]13C values of CCC in the Stratenska Jaskyna Cave indicate either water freezing in a more opened system with continuous CO2 escape (Rayleigh fractional separation), or participation of another CO2 source. The model of slow water freezing under isotope equilibrium is supported by isolated character of the caves having limited ventilation.In contrast, modern cryogenic cave calcite powders sampled directly on the ice surface of two recently iced caves in Slovakia with high ventilation showed much higher [delta]18O and [delta]13C data, similar to cryogenic calcites obtained in experimental rapid water freezing

REE3 and Mn2 activated cathodoluminescence in lateglacial and Holocene stalagmites of central Europe: evidence for climatic processes?, 2004, Richter Detlev K. , Gotte Thomas, Niggemann Stefan, Wurth Georg,
Combined visual cathodoluminescence (CL) and spectral analyses of CL reveals periodic enrichments of rare earth elements (REE3) and manganese (Mn2) within the laminations of eight calcitic lateglacial to postglacial stalagmites. In the annual layers, the enrichment of trace elements can be correlated with the autumn/winter laminae, which are strongly pigmented and rich in organic carbon. During the Holocene, they occur especially in the Atlantic stage and in subrecent/recent times. The enrichment of REE3 and Mn reflects times of more intense weathering, which presumably prevailed during the Atlantic warm and humid climate. In subrecent/recent times, especially the last 100 years, these enrichments may have been at least partially anthropogenically induced

Natural Speleothem Damage in Postojnska Jama, Slovenia, Caused by Glacial Cave Ice? A First Assessment, 2004, Kempe, Stephan

Natural speleothem damage has been known from Postojnska jama for a long time. Schaffenrath was the first to depict broken and leaning stalagmites on his pictures from the interior of the cave. Hohenwart analysed some of these damages, clearly excluding rock fall or earthquakes as a cause. Here the author discusses the possibilities, which could cause natural speleothem breakage in general. The most promising cause is cave ice. It must have formed in caves during glacial maxima when permafrost spread throughout northern, eastern and central Europe. Consequently cave ice could be the most prominent factor in explaining non-recent speleothem damage. Next some of the historically known flowstone breakages from Postojnska jama are presented. These are discussed in view of cave ice and an ad hoc model for the genesis is given. In the side passages Pisani rov and Brezimenski rov there are masses of broken stalagmites and stalactites and speleothem fragments in precarious positions. Cave ice offers an overall process to explain these observations. Thus it is suggested that all or parts of the Postojnska jama were filled with ice during the Last and earlier Glacials. If accepting speleothem damage as a consequence of glacial cave ice, then it should be possible to use it as a marker facies for the extent of the zero temperature line during the various glacials.


Grottes et karsts dEurope centrale dans les Encyclopdies franaises du XVIIIe sicle, 2006, Gauchon Christophe
Central European caves and karsts in French Encyclopaedias of xviiith century - The xviiith century, and especially the second half, was a time of great progress in natural history and, more particularly, in the knowledge of caves, and this interest for caves appeared in several Encyclopaedias published in that time. At the very end of xviith century, several dictionaries of History or Geography [Baudrand, Moreri] were printed in France. Their aim was to give a wide panorama of the whole human knowledge. After 1750, D. Diderot and J. dAlembert began the publishing of the great Encyclopaedia, or reasoned dictionary of sciences, arts and technology [1751-1765]. More than just a dictionary, this major opus of the Enlightenments purposed to criticize all the old knowledges, with the intention of rebuilding by the reason a new understanding of the world. As it was considered disrespectful towards church, Jesuits published another Encyclopaedia, the Dictionnaire de Trvoux . Then, at the end of xviiith century, Panckoucke published the huge Methodical Encyclopaedia , with three volumes for modern Geography and five for physical Geography . So, dozens and dozens of caves all over the world were described in these dictionaries and Encyclopaedias, and here well try to expose what is about central Europe. The articles about regional geography (Istria, Alps) were often reduced to historical relations or to very poor lists of geographical names. Before the publishing of the last Encyclopaedia of the century, travellers relations seemed unknown by the authors of the dictionaries. The methodical Encyclopaedia showed a clear progress with, for instance, two articles about Croatia: the article river Cettina described several phenomena of karstic hydrology; or the article Biocova dealt with the ice-caves of the Mont-Mossor. It seems that Dictionaries and encyclopaedias had better information about caves of France or Germany where fossilized bones had been discovered. Some caves of the Mediterranean countries were also well known, because of the mythological or biblical traditions; numerous references to Timavo spring were based only on ancient roman geographers. But what about the caves of central Europe? The cave of Retelstein in Styria and the cave of Ribar (Hungary) were described in the great Encyclopaedia, and the article Cave gave a long list in which we find a short mention of the caves of Postojna and Podpec (Slovenia). But the longest articles were about Cirknitz Lake: all the dictionaries gave a large place to this famous place for hunting, fishing and ploughing , as repeated Moreri or Baudrand who looked at this phenomenon as a wonder. In the great Encyclopaedia, the description was much more accurate and tried to explain the working of the lake in the surroundings: the sink holes and the resurgences were well identified. These accurate descriptions of Cirknitz Lake stand in strong contrast with the short mentions of Postojna, which is still supposed to be two milles long As to Recca of San Canzian, this place never appeared in French dictionaries and Encyclopaedias of the xviiith century: Skocjan seemed completely unknown But these various spots were described without any connection among them. If the authors of the Encyclopaedias wanted to break definitively with all the superstitions from old ages, they were not yet able to understand the meaning of what we call karstic landscapes . On this point, the age of Enlightenments appears as a time of transition. Now, articles about Carniole (former name for main part of Slovenia) show an interesting evolution of the authors points of view. Masson de Morvilliers in the Methodical Encyclopaedia (modern Geography) explained that this country contains many noteworthy caves . And in the volume v of physical Geography [1828], the article about Zirknitz Lake ended with this interesting remark: The whole range of surrounding mountains is composed with porous limestone in which rain and snow-melting waters enter () The whole country, from north borders of Carniola to the shores of Adriatic Sea, and from the caves of Planina to the Timavo Springs, is full with streams suddenly issued from the ground and pointing out a subterranean current, which is logically to link with the working of Zirknitz Lake. So, with the help of these Encyclopaedias, we may have a good survey of the erudite geography of Karst in xviiith century and we can understand the basis on which the knowledge would get positive progress during the xixth one.

Late Pleistocene cryogenic calcite spherolites from the Malachitdom Cave (NE Rhenish Slate Mountains, Germany): origin, unusual internal structure and stable C-O isotope composition, 2008, Richter D. K. , Riechelmann D. F. Ch.
Cryogenic calcites yielded U-series ages in the range from 15.610.20 ka to 14.480.12 ka, which is the youngest age obtained so far for this type of cryogenic cave carbonates in Europe. Most of these particles of the Malachitdom Cave (NE Brilon, Sauerland, North Rhine-Westphalia) are complex spherolites usually smaller than 1 cm. They show ?13C-values between 1 and 5 VPDB and ?18O-values ranging from 7 to 16 VPDB, the ?13C-values increase and the ?18O-values decrease from centre to border. The complex spherolites are interpreted to be formed in slowly freezing pools of residual water on ice, a situation that repeatedly occurred during the change of glacial to interglacial periods in the periglacial areas of Central Europe. After the melting of the caveice, the complex pherolites make up one type of cryogenic calcite particles in the arenitic to ruditic sediment.

Characteristics of discharge at Rose and Gellért Hills, Budapest, Hungary, 2008, Erõ, Ss Anita, Má, Dlszõ, Nyi Judit, Csoma Anita É, .

This study focuses on the discharge characteristics of the Buda Thermal Karst (Budapest, Hungary) found at the Rose and Gellért Hills. The Buda Thermal Karst is a recently active hydrothermal karst system in the heart of Budapest. Studying this unique hydrogeologic system is thus a challenge because of the human impact effects. The research approach is based on the concept of hydrological system analysis (Engelen and Kloosterman 1996), which means that the flow system geometry and recharge-discharge features must correlate when the influence of man on the flow regimes of an area is negligible. Therefore the flow system geometry could be deduced from the evaluation of manifestations of flowing groundwater. To achieve this archival hydrogeologic data and recent observations were used. Based on the localization of springs, collections of archival temperature and chemical data, as well as recent observations, conceptual models were established for the discharge in the Rose Hill and Gellért Hill areas. The observations indicate different discharge characteristics for the two study areas.


Late Pleistocene cryogenic calcite spherolites from the Malachitdom Cave (NE Rhenish Slate Mountains, Germany): origin, unusual internal structure and stable C-O isotope composition, 2008, Richter D. K. , Riechelmann D. F. Ch.

Cryogenic calcites yielded U-series ages in the range from 15.61±0.20 ka to 14.48±0.12 ka, which is the youngest age obtained so far for this type of cryogenic cave carbonates in Europe. Most of these particles of the Malachitdom Cave (NE Brilon, Sauerland, North Rhine-Westphalia) are complex spherolites usually smaller than 1 cm. They show δ13C-values between –1 and –5 ‰ VPDB and δ18O-values ranging from –7 to –16 ‰ VPDB, the δ13C-values increase and the δ18O-values decrease from centre to border. The complex spherolites are interpreted to be formed in slowly freezing pools of residual water on ice, a situation that repeatedly occurred during the change of glacial to interglacial periods in the periglacial areas of Central Europe. After the melting of the caveice, the complex spherolites make up one type of cryogenic calcite particles in the arenitic to ruditic sediment.


Hhlenheuschrecken - Zum Jubilum einer Wortschpfung, 2008, Christian, E.
The compound Hhlenheuschrecke was created by the Austrian entomologist Vincenz Kollar 175 years ago. To mark this anniversary, the present review highlights several aspects of the research history and the biology of cave crickets. Emphasis is laid on Troglophilus cavicola (Kollar, 1833), originally described from the small cave Schelmenloch south of Vienna, because this species was the first to be named after the cave environment. Cave and camel crickets (Rhaphidophoridae) and the central European representatives of this subcosmopolitan familiy are characterized here, followed by a biogeographic outline of European cave crickets. The Austrian ranges of T. cavicola and its close relative T. neglectus Krauss, 1879 were shaped by post-glacial expansion, whereas records of T. neglectus north of the Alps probably reflect anthropogenic transport. The two species are not restricted to carbonate rock or to the presence of natural caves; crucial, however, is the availability of frost-protected subterranean overwintering shelters. From spring to fall, our Troglophilus species feed on plant debris and small arthropods out in the open, where oviposition takes place as well. In a full lifespan, the individual changes twice between a chiefly aboveground summer phase and a subterranean winter phase. Caves can simultaneously house juvenile and adult Troglophilus all the year round.

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