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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That residue is solids remaining after evaporation [16].?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for chalk karst (Keyword) returned 16 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 16
Strengthening of soils during construction under chalk karst conditions, 1994, Zhivoderov V. ,

New geometric organization of the chalk karst drainage: The weathering mesh-network of the Mansonniere cave system (Bellou-sur-Huisne, Orne, France), 1996, Rodet J. ,
The Mansonniere karst system presents a labyrinthic network opened on a tectonic pattern near the fault of Belleme. It is the first known chalk karst system of over 1 km explored galleries in the world. This is also the standard model of a karst system set on a tectonic mesh, developed in a chalk plateau without a detritic cover, showing specific processes. The great karst maze is in fact a poorly drained network but still a functional one which progresses by coalescent weathering fronts, in the tectonic network. This kind of pattern is specific of a primitive degree of karstification

An investigation, using the chalk karst of Haute-Normandie (France), as an example of the relationships between the surface and endokarst using a granulometric method, 1998, Lacroix M. , Leboulanger T. , Wang H. Q. , Feeny V. , Dupont J. P. , Meyer R. ,
Karst, by definition, is the result of rock dissolution. Ii the rock is not completely soluble, residues will remain ('acquired' particles). This insoluble material, present in the springs issuing From the karst body after some time lag, provides information regarding karst processes taking place within the rock body. The presence of pathways between the surface and the endokarst is reflected by an increase in the suspended particulate material (SPM) that may be considered to be 'inherited' from outside of the karst system, By the study of microgranulometric spectra the origins of the particles are differentiated and, on this basis, a classification of karst systems is proposed. The technique was applied to the chalk karat of Haute Normandie (France) by obtaining characterisations of the microgranulometric fraction of the main surface formations (clay-with-flints and loess) and that produced by dissolution of the chalk. By the comparison of these spectra with those of the SPM contained in ten karst springs, it was possible to define two types of karsts ('open' and 'closed') and their intermediates. In 'closed' karst a majority of the particles originated from the dissolution of the chalk itself, while in the 'open' karst, the majority of the particles are derived from the surface formations. This notion of 'aperture' is quite different from the conventional allogenic/authigenic karst classification which implies the formation of an impermeable residual soil that focuses surface water inputs

Mise en evidence des relations surface-endokarst par la microgranulometrie, exemple du karst crayeux haut-normand, 1998, Lacroix Michel, Leboulanger Thierry, Wang Huaqing, Feeny Veronique, Dupont Jean Paul, Meyer Robert,
Karst, by definition, is the result of rock dissolution. If the rock is not completely soluble, residues will remain ('acquired' particles). This insoluble material, present in the springs issuing from the karst body after some time lag, provides information regarding karst processes taking place within the rock body. The presence of pathways between the surface and the endokarst is reflected by an increase in the suspended particulate material (SPM) that may be considered to be 'inherited' from outside of the karst system. By the study of microgranulometric spectra the origins of the particles are differentiated and, on this basis, a classification of karst systems is proposed. The technique was applied to the chalk karst of Haute Normandie (France) by obtaining characterisations of the microgranulometric fraction of the main surface formations (clay-with-flints and loess) and that produced by dissolution of the chalk. By the comparison of these spectra with those of the SPM contained in ten karst springs, it was possible to define two types of karsts ('open' and 'closed') and their intermediates. In 'closed' karst a majority of the particles originated from the dissolution of the chalk itself, while in the 'open' karst, the majority of the particles are derived from the surface formations. This notion of 'aperture' is quite different from the conventional allogenic/authigenic karst classification which implies the formation of an impermeable residual soil that focuses surface water inputs

Symposium Abstract: Chalk karst: Observations from geological field mapping, 2001, Farrant A. R. , Cooper A. H. , Booth K. A.

Subsidence hazard in Berkshire in areas underlain by chalk karst, 2001, Edmonds Cn,
Purpose of survey During the last ten years a number of ground subsidence events have occurred in the northwest part of Reading. Many of the subsidence events resulted in structural damage to existing properties (see Plates 1 and 2). On the basis of the properties inspected to date it appears that the local housing has been constructed mostly upon conventional strip footings bearing onto naturally occurring soils. The increasing number of recorded subsidence events is of concern to planners, developers and insurers. Consequently the aim of the survey was to identify the nature and extent of subsidence hazard in the local area. The site The northwest part of Reading, generally referred to as Caversham, is shown in Figure 1. It largely comprises a south to southeasterly dipping land surface, overlooking the River Thames. North of the Thames the land surface is dissected by a NNW-SSE trending valley feature known as Hemdean Bottom. This divides the westerly Caversham Heights area from the easterly Caversham Park and Emmer Green areas. The Thames lies at just below 40 m AOD and northwards the land rises to above 80 m AOD. The floor of Hemdean Bottom generally lies between 40 m and 50 m AOD. Geology The published geological map at 1:10 560 scale (British Geological Survey County Series Berkshire Sheet 29 SE) for this area shows the entire district to be underlain by Cretaceous Upper Chalk, overlain by a Tertiary Reading Beds outlier to the northeast side of Hemdean Bottom. ... This 250-word extract was created in the absence of an abstract

Forecasting of turbid floods in a coastal, chalk karstic drain using an artificial neural network, 2001, Beaudeau P, Leboulanger T, Lacroix M, Hanneton S, Wang Hq,
Water collected at the Yport (eastern Normandy, France) Drinking Water Supply well, situated on a karst cavity, is affected by surface runoff-related turbidity spikes that occur mainly in winter, In order to forecast turbidity, precipitation was measured at the center of the catchment basin over two years, while water level and turbidity were monitored at the web site. Application of the approach of Box and Jenkins (1976) leads to a linear model that can accurately predict major floods about eight hours in advance, providing an estimate of turbidity variation on the basis of precipitation and mater level variation over the previous 24 hours. However, this model is intrinsically unable to deal with (1) nonstationary changes in the time process caused by seasonal variations of in ground surface characteristics or tidal influence within the downstream past of the aquifer, and (2) nonlinear phenomena such as the threshold for the onset of runoff. This results in many false-positive signals of turbidity in summer. Here we present an alternative composite model combining a conceptual runoff submodel with a feedforward artificial neural network (ANN), This composite model allows us to deal with meaningful variables, the actioneffect of which on turbidity is complex, nonlinear, temporally variable and often poorly described. Predictions are markedly improved, i.e,, the variance of the target variable explained by 12-hour forward predictions increases from 28% to 74% and summer inaccuracies are considerably lowered. The ANN can adjust itself to new hydrological conditions, provided that on-line learning is maintained

Microgranulometric approach to a chalk karst, western Paris Basin, France, 2002, Lacroix M. , Rodet J. , Wang H. Q. , Laignel B. , Dupont J. P. ,
By definition, karst is the result of dissolution, and if the rock is not completely soluble, residues will remain ('acquired' particles). These insoluble residues provide a history of karstic activity and can be found in the outflows after a possible storage period in the endokarst. A direct connection, even if temporary, between the endokarst and the surface is reflected by the contribution of particles, which are referred to as 'inherited'. We have studied the chalk karsts of Haut Normandie by comparing microgranulometric spectra of suspended matter (SM), in subterranean waters and in solutions of the main surface formations (Clay-with-Flints Complex (CFC) and loess) and the Chalk dissolution products of all local stratigraphic levels. Based on these microgranulometric spectra, we propose a conceptual model for processes occurring in chalk karsts and a classification scheme for karstified systems according to how such systems deal with particles. In a 'closed' karst, the suspended matter tends to come from the Chalk itself, while in the case of an 'open' karst, the majority of suspended particles comes from surface formations. This notion of 'openness' differs from the currently used categorization into allogenic and autogenic systems, which depends upon an impermeable cover concentrating the infiltration. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V All rights reserved

Transport of suspended solids from a karstic to an alluvial aquifer: the role of the karst/alluvium interface, 2002, Massei N. , Lacroix M. , Wang H. Q. , Mahler B. J. , Dupont J. P. ,
This study focuses on the coupled transport of dissolved constituents and particulates, from their infiltration on a Karst plateau to their discharge from a karst spring and their arrival at a well in an alluvial plain, Particulate markers were identified and the transport of solids was characterised in situ in porous and karstic media, based on particle size analyses, SEM, and traces. Transport from the sinkhole to the spring appeared to be dominated by flow through karst: particulate transport was apparently conservative between the two sites, and there was little difference in the overall character of the particle size distribution of the particulates infiltrating the sinkhole and of those discharging from the spring. Qualitatively, the mineralogy of the infiltrating and discharging material was similar, although at the spring an autochthonous contribution from die aquifer was noted (chalk particles eroded from the parent rock by weathering). In contrast, transport between the spring and the well appears to be affected by the overlying alluvium: particles in the water from the well, showed evidence of considerable size-sorting. Additionally, SEM images of the well samples showed the presence of particles originating from the overlying alluvial system; these particles were not found in samples from the sinkhole or the spring. The differences between the particulates discharging from the spring and the well indicate that the water pumped from the alluvial plain is coming from the Karst aquifer via the very transmissive, complex geologic interface between the underlying chalk formation and the gravel at the base of the overlying alluvial system. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved

Caves and Karsts of Northeast Africa., 2003, Halliday William R.
At least potentially karstifiable rocks cover much of the surface of Egypt and northern Libya. Study of caves and other karstic features of this region has been hampered by lack of roads, rapid disintegration of the surface of friable, poorly consolidated limestone, wind-blown sand and other factors. Interbedding with marly aquicludes hampers speleogenesis locally. Calcareous and evaporite karsts are present, however, and their waters are important albeit generally limited resources. Large quantities of fresh water are lost through submarine springs downslope from Libya's Gebel al Akhdar range; the caves and karst of that range may be among the world's greatest. A recent attempted compendium of caves and karsts of Egypt and Libya contains several important errors; the supposed 5+ km Ain Zayanah Cave does not exist and the Zayanah System includes several smaller caves. The Bir al Ghanam gypsum karst of northwest Libya, however, has caves up to 3.5 km long. In Egypt, the Mokattam, South Galala, Ma'aza, Siwa and Western Desert karsts and the "White Desert" chalk karst of Farafra Depression are especially important. Qattara and nearby depressions may be karstic rather than structural in origin. Unique Wadi Sannur Cave is the world's largest gour and a potential World Heritage site. Little knownsandstone karsts or pseudokarsts in southwestern Egypt may contain analogues of features recently identified on Mars. The well-publicised Uweinat caves of northwestern Sudan are talus caves.

Assessment of direct transfer and resuspension of particles during turbid floods at a karstic spring, 2003, Massei N. , Wang H. Q. , Dupont J. P. , Rodet J. , Laignel B. ,
Turbid water can be the source of important sanitary problems in karstic regions. It is the case of the Pays de Caux, in Haute Normandie, where the main resource in drinking water is provided by the chalk aquifer. In the case of the typical binary karst of the Pays de Caux, turbidity results from the input in sinkholes of turbid surface water induced by erosion on the plateaus. At some spring tappings, water may be very turbid in period of intense rainfall. The turbidity observed at a karstic spring is a complex signal which contains a part of direct transfer and a part of resuspension of the particles being transported. The aim of this study is turbidigraph separation, which would permit to distinguish the direct transfer and resuspension components of the turbidigraph. These two components are separated by comparing the elementary surface storm-derived water fluxes and elementary turbidity signals at the spring. The procedure takes place in three phases: (i) spring hydrograph separation by means of a two components mixing model (surface water and karstic groundwater) using specific electrical conductivity, (ii) decomposition of storm-derived water flux and turbidity thanks to the second-derivative method, (iii) comparison of the transfer times (approximate tomodal times) of the elementary turbidity and surface water flux signals, respectively. The mass corresponding to direct transfer, computed after signal decomposition, is then used to re-calculate a particle recovery rate, which passes so from 514 to 373%. Relations between particle flux and hydrodynamics show that resuspension can be either the fact of the dynamics of the introduction system, or that of the chalk karstic aquifer in general (case of resuspension not associated to surface water flux). In this sense, evolution of particle flux (and consequently of turbidity) can be also a marker of the karst structure. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved

An example of sedimentary filling in the chalk karst of the Western Paris Basin: Characterization, origins and hydrosedimentary behaviour, 2004, Laignel B. , Dupuis E. , Rodet J. , Lacroix M. , Massei N. ,
The Petites Dales cave is a favourable site for studying the sedimentary fillings of the chalk karst of the Western Paris Basin. Our study is based on the lithological characterization of karstic sediments and mineralogical and chemical comparisons between these sediments and the likely sedimentary sources (insoluble residue of chalk, clay-with-flints, loess). Our results show that there are three main families of sediment in the Petites Dales karst: brown clayey silts, beige silts, pale beige silts. The karst sediments essentially originate in the mechanical erosion of loess. The insoluble residue of chalk, coming from the chalk weathering, is only located in the brown clayey silts, and constitutes a weak amount of this sediment type. According to these results, we propose three conceptual models of hydro sedimentary behaviour of the Petites Dales karstic system that could have resulted in such an intra-karstic deposition sequence

Morfogenesis of chalk karst in the Volhynia Elevation (NW Ukraine), 2005, Dobrowolski Rados?aw, Bogucki Andrij, Zaleski Iwan

Les Microcodium: un traceur naturel des coulements karstiques dans les craies champenoises proximit des formations palocnes (Marne, France)., 2007, Lejeune O. , Devos A. , Fronteau G. , Roche D. , Lefevre A. , Sosson C.
The microcodium: A natural tracer of karstic flowpaths in the Champagne chalk close to the Paleocene formations (Marne, France) - Our study group GEGENA was asked to study the karstic flowpaths witin the Champagne chalk. This work was done within a research program (AQUAL) investigating the agricultural pollutions within the Vesle basin. The absence of good conditions to conduct classical dye tracing experiments led us to search for a natural tracer to prove that karstic circulations do exist. A stratigraphic study permitted to isolate a microcodium fossil, present in the upper parts of the Campagnian chalks, which could be a natural tracer for the chalk karst area around the Montagne de Reims. This tracer is locally associated with archeological elements which permit to state that the flow is karstic. The Trpail spring was used as a test site for the validation of the method. The sediments collected in the spring as well as in other springs nearby do indeed contain many microcodium remains.

Karst and Cryokarst, 2007,

"Karst and Cryokarst", dedicated to the memory of Teresa Wiszniowska (authority on research of large fossil mammals, cave bear especially) and Marian Pulina (authority on speleology and geomorphology), contains works covering the subjects of their broad scientific interests.
The book is a joint publication of IGU Karst Commission and UIS Commission Glacier Caves and Cryokarst in Polar and High Mountain Regions /GLACKIPR/.

Contents:
Eraso A., Domìnguez M.C.
Subpolar glacier network as natural sensors of global warming evolution
Mavlyudov B.R.
Internal drainage systems of glaciers
Schroeder J.
Moulins of a subpolar glacier seen as a thermal anomaly Domìnguez M.C., Eraso A.
Frequent systematic errors In the measurements of the glacier discharge
Domínguez M.C., Eraso A.
Substantial changes happened during the last years in the icecap of King George, Insular Antarctica
Eraso A., Domínguez M.C.
Physicochemical characteristics of the subglacier discharge in Potter Cove, King George Island, Antarctica
Sauro U.
Forms of mixed origin in the karst environment of the Venetian Prealps
Auly T.
Quelques morphologies de rapport karst/glaciaire dans les Pyrénées (France)
Pawłowska-Bielawska P.
Evolution of Wielka Śnieżna Cave in the light of geomorphologic observations
Dobrowolski R.
Model of glaciogenic transformation of the Lublin-Volhynia chalk karst (Poland SE, Ukraine NW)
Bieroński J., Socha P., Stefaniak K.
Deposits and fauna of the Sudetic caves ? the state of research Trofimova E.V.
Particularités du développement récent du karst calcaire de Sibérie et d'Extrême-Orient (Russie)
Cao Jianhua, Yuan Daoxian, Zhang Cheng, Jiang Zhangcheng
Karst ecosystem of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region constrained by geological setting: Relationship between carbonate rock exposure and vegetation coverage
Smieja A., Smieja-Król B.
Springs with active calcium carbonate precipitation in the Polish part of the Tatra Mountains
Parise M., Trisciuzzi M.A.
Geomechanical characterization of carbonate rock masses in underground karst systems
Piasecki J., Sawiński T.
Acoustic measurements of airflow in speleo-climatological studies
Kadebskaya O.
News in monitoring system and recommendations in development of use and protection of Kungur Ice cave
Mokrushina O.
Ordinskaya cave as new object of speleoturism

Book is available at the Department of Geomorphology University of Silesia ordering via e-mail: atyc@us.edu.pl


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