Community news

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That ground-water cascade is the flow of ground water over a subsurface barrier [16].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

What is Karstbase?

Search KARSTBASE:

keyword
author

Browse Speleogenesis Issues:

KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
See all featured articles from other geoscience journals

Search in KarstBase

Your search for data logger (Keyword) returned 9 results for the whole karstbase:
An inexpensive flow-through field fluorometer., 1997, Schnegg Pa. , Doerfliger N.
In order to simplify sampling dye tracers in water streams without having to invest money in expensive systems, we developed a highly sensitive flow-through field fluorometer. This apparatus was tested successfully in the field with fluorescein and sulforhodamine. A submersible probe is connected to a digital data logger and the data is written to a PCMCIA memory card allowing 2 weeks of unattended recording at 1 sample every 4 minutes. A sensitivity as low as 0.05 ppb has been achieved. Simultaneous concentration measurements of 2 tracers is possible, at the expense of reduced sensitivity, however.

MODERN TREND IN CAVE MONITORING, 2002, Cigna, Arrigo A.

The evolution of cave monitoring since 19th century is described. The advantage of the development of theories was the possibility to obtain comparable results and forecast the evolution of a cave climate before irreversible modifications take place. The most important parameters to be monitored are indicated. In recent years both important technological improvements have been obtained and the relative importance of each parameter has been reviewed. Kartchner Caverns, Arizona, USA, was opened to the public in November 1999. Some preliminary studies have been performed. Arizona Conservation Project, Inc. (ACPI) established 22 monitoring stations. An evaluation of the impact assessment was obtained. The second case concerns Cango Cave. A simple monitoring network has been installed in September 2000 to be operated for one year. It consists in about 15 rugged data loggers distributed along the cave. Air and water temperature, carbon dioxide concentration, and relative humidity are measured and the values are transferred periodically by a shuttle into a computer outside the cave. A totally automatic monitoring network will be installed in the future after the results of the first simple network are achieved.


Non-linearities in drip water hydrology: an example from Stump Cross Caverns, Yorkshire, 2003, Baker A, Brunsdon C,
Drip rate data have been collected at 15 min intervals at six locations in Stump Cross Caverns, N England, since 1998. The different drip sites cover a wide range of drip rates from ~2 drips/s to 2 drips/h, and in general the variability of drip rate increases with mean drip rate. In our continuous data sampling we observe rapid discharge increases which appear to be synchronous between drips sites, and which can be explained by flow switching of the water overlying the cave during times of high infiltration rate, such as intense rain storms or rapid snowmelt. A test for non-linearity (White test) in the drip series provides very strong evidence that many of the drip sequences are non-linear. We conclude that at our drip sites there is a non-linear input (weather) and non-linearities within the karst system leading to non-linear dripping, which is independent of drip rate. Our results have implications for stalagmite palaeoclimatology, where such widespread non linearities have not been taken account of

Das Untertagelabor in den Obir-Hhlen., 2004, Sptl, Ch.
The Obir Caves in the southern part of the province of Carinthia are among the best known dripstone caves in Austria. These caverns were only discovered as a result of mining operations during the 19th century and parts of them were adapted as a show cave which was opened in 1991. In a cave system adjacent to the show cave and not open to the public, an underground research station was set up in 1998 and has been in operation since then. This laboratory encompasses a total of six automatic drip water measurement stations in two cave chambers, as well as air temperature data loggers. On regular cave visits every one to two months since 1998, a series of manual measurements (e.g., partial pressure of CO2) and water and cave air samples have been taken. Compositional parameters determined on site include pH, electric conductivity and carbonate alkalinity. Parameters determined in laboratories elsewhere include cations (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Sr), anions (Cl, F, NO3, SO4), dissolved silica and stable isotopes (dD, d18O, d13CDIC, d13Cair). These measurements are complemented by soil studies above the cave (soil temperature and soil water chemistry, rainwater composition).[Obir-Hhlensystem]

Hydrochemical variations during flood pulses in the south-west China peak cluster karst: impacts of CaCO3-H2O-CO2 interactions, 2004, Liu Z. H. , Groves C. , Yuan D. X. , Meiman J. , Jiang G. H. , He S. Y. , Li Q. A. ,
High-resolution measurements of rainfall, water level, pH, conductivity, temperature and carbonate chemistry parameters of groundwater at two adjacent locations within the peak cluster karst of the Guilin Karst Experimental Site in Guangxi Province, China, were made with different types of multiparameter sonde. The data were stored using data loggers recording with 2 min or 15 min resolution. Waters from a large, perennial spring represent the exit for the aquifer's conduit flow, and a nearby well measures water in the conduit-adjacent, fractured media. During flood pulses, the pH of the conduit flow water rises as the conductivity falls. In contrast, and at the same time, the pH of groundwater in the fractures drops, as conductivity rises. As Ca2 and HCO3- were the dominant (>90%) ions, we developed linear relationships (both r(2) > 0.91) between conductivity and those ions, respectively, and in turn calculated variations in the calcite saturation index (SIc) and CO2 partial pressure (PCO2) of water during flood pulses. Results indicate that the PCO2 of fracture water during flood periods is higher than that at lower flows, and its SIc is lower. Simultaneously, PCO2 of conduit water during the flood period is lower than that at lower flows, and its SIc also is lower. From these results we conclude that at least two key processes are controlling hydrochemical variations during flood periods: (i) dilution by precipitation and (ii) water-rock-gas interactions. To explain hydrochemical variations in the fracture water, the water-rock-gas interactions may be more important. For example, during flood periods, soil gas with high CO2 concentrations dissolves in water and enters the fracture system, the water, which in turn has become more highly undersaturated, dissolves more limestone, and the conductivity increases. Dilution of rainfall is more important in controlling hydrochemical variations of conduit water, because rainfall with higher pH (in this area apparently owing to interaction with limestone dust in the lower atmosphere) and low conductivity travels through the conduit system rapidly. These results illustrate that to understand the hydrochemical variations in karst systems, considering only water-rock interactions is not sufficient, and the variable effects of CO2 on the system should be evaluated. Consideration of water-rock-gas interactions is thus a must in understanding variations in karst hydrochemistry. Copyright (C) 2004 John Wiley Sons, Ltd

Das Untertagelabor in den Obir-Hhlen, 2004, Sptl, Ch.
The Obir Caves in the southern part of the province of Carinthia are among the best known dripstone caves in Austria. These caverns were only discovered as a result of mining operations during the 19th century and parts of them were adapted as a show cave which was opened in 1991. In a cave system adjacent to the show cave and not open to the public, an underground research station was set up in 1998 and has been in operation since then. This laboratory encompasses a total of six automatic drip water measurement stations in two cave chambers, as well as air temperature data loggers. On regular cave visits every one to two months since 1998, a series of manual measurements (e.g., partial pressure of CO2) and water and cave air samples have been taken. Compositional parameters determined on site include pH, electric conductivity and carbonate alkalinity. Parameters determined in laboratories elsewhere include cations (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Sr), anions (Cl, F, NO3, SO4), dissolved silica and stable isotopes (dD, d18O, d13CDIC, d13Cair). These measurements are complemented by soil studies above the cave (soil temperature and soil water chemistry, rainwater composition).

Diffuse Flow Separation Within Karst Underground River at Ngreneng Cave Yogyakarta - Indonesia, 2009, Tjahyo Nugroho Adji, Heru Hendrayana, Sudarmadji, Suratman Woro
Diffuse flow is a dependable flow to recharge karst underground river within the dry season. This research is conducted at Ngreneng Cave, which is famous as the leakage tributary of Bribin River, the most important underground river in Gunungsewu karst area, Central Java. The objective of this research is to separate the karst flow components at Ngreneng Cave, in order to acknowledge the percentage of diffuse flow during the period of measurement. A water level data logger is installed during one year period to understand the variation of water level within dry and wet season. Furthermore, to define Stage Discharge Rating Curve, several discharge measurement is conducted within minimum, average and maximum discharge condition. Afterwards, the diffuse flow separation from its total flow is conducted by using automated base flow separation by digital filtering. The digital filtering values is acquired from the analysis of recession constant value in the occurrence of flood events in a year observation and related to the value of the base flow maximum indices (BFI) of karst aquifer. The result shows that during one year observation, Ngreneng Cave experiences 68 times of flooding, with digital filtering value of 0.992. In general, the monthly estimation of the diffuse flow percentage is very close to 80%, whereas it decreases to 41-59% during flood events.

SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATION OF HYDROGEOCHEMISTRY AND KARST FLOW PROPERTIES TO CHARACTERIZE KARST DYNAMIC SYSTEM IN BRIBIN UNDERGROUND RIVER, GUNUNG KIDUL REGENCY, DIY PROVINCE, 2010, Adji, Tjahyo Nugroho

This research is conducted in karst area, which is particularly enclosed by Bribin Underground River Catchment, Gunungkidul Regency. The objectives of this study are: (1) to understand spatial and temporal variation of flow characteristic as well as Diffuse Flow Proportion (PAD) of Bribin River; (2) to assess hydrogeochemistry and to recognize the relationship between hydrogeochemistry and flow characteristics of Bribin River, and (3) to define water agressivity of Bribin River with respect to carbonate mineral and to express the components of Karst Dynamic System (KDS) one-year behavior.
To define flow characteristic and PAD, three water level data loggers are installed within upper, lower and the leakage point along Bribin River continued by discharge measurement with the purpose of attaining stage-discharge rating curve. Afterwards, PAD is defined by conducting digital filtering baseflow separation approach after calculation of diffuse, fissure, and conduit recession constant. Next, to figure out hydrogeochemical condition, 120 sample of karst water are analyzed including rain, underground-river, and drip water. After that, scatter plots between hydrogeochemical parameters are conducted to achieve the correlation between PAD and hydrogeochemistry as well as to figure out hydrogeochemical processes to occur. Subsequently, Saturation Indices analysis with respect to calcite mineral and KDS components correlation is carried out to define karst water agressivity and its manners along flowpath of Bribin River.
The research’s result demonstrates that there is spatial and temporal differentiation of flow characteristics along Bribin River attributable to the comportment of karst aquifer toward discharging its diffuse, fissure, or conduit flow components, which consequence to the dissimilarity of PAD distribution along Bribin River. Accordingly, PAD characteristics result to dry season hydrogeochemical condition of Bribin River. However, wet season hydrogeochemical condition is more influenced by means of dilution by precipitation process within flood events, which exaggerates CO2 content of water. Generally, the upper-stream cave tend to more aggressive in dissolving limestone, contrast to down-steam cave that be inclined to precipitate carbonate mineral as a result of their differentiation of cavities configuration. In addition, down-stream cave is characterized by open system cavities, subsequent to the CO2 discharge to preserve dissolution process.


Hydrochemical variations of epikarst springs in vertical climate zones: a case study in Jinfo Mountain National Nature Reserve of China, 2011, Zhang Cheng, Yan Jun, Pei Jianguo, Jiang Yongjun

High temporal resolution (15 min) measurements of stage, pH, electric conductivity, temperature, and other hydrochemical parameters of groundwater at two sites in the Jinfo Mountain Nature Reserve of China were collected using automatic data loggers. Bitan Spring (BS 700 m a.s.l.) sits in subtropical climate zone, while Shuifang Spring (SS 2,060 m a.s.l.) is located in plateau temperate climate. The data show that hydrochemistry of epikarst springs at different altitudes is very sensitive to the changes of their physical environment, especially two factors: air temperature and soil CO2 concentration. Springs at lower altitude are associated with higher air temperature and soil CO2 concentration, thus more likely leading to more active karst processes than those at higher elevation. Water temperature and pH of BS showed a noticeable diurnal circle with high values in daytime and low values at night. The data also indicate that at least there are two effects that could impact the variations of groundwater hydrochemistry during flood pulse: dilution effect and CO2 effect.


Results 1 to 9 of 9
You probably didn't submit anything to search for