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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That model is 1. a conceptual, mathematical, or physical system obeying certain specified conditions, whose behavior is used to understand the physical system to which it is analogous in someway [22]. 2. a conceptual description and the associated mathematical representation of a system, subsystem, components, or condition that is used to predict chances from a baseline state as a function of internal and/or external stimuli and as a function of time and space [22]. 3. a simplified system bearing some physical similarity to a prototype [16].?

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for environmental isotopes (Keyword) returned 12 results for the whole karstbase:
Environmental isotopes in groundwater hydrology, 1980, Fontes J.

CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF GROUNDWATER NEAR A SINKHOLE LAKE, NORTHERN FLORIDA .1. FLOW PATTERNS, AGE OF GROUNDWATER, AND INFLUENCE OF LAKE WATER LEAKAGE, 1995, Katz B. G. , Lee T. M. , Plummer L. N. , Busenberg E. ,
Leakage from sinkhole lakes significantly influences recharge to the Upper Floridan aquifer in poorly confined sediments in northern Florida. Environmental isotopes (oxygen 18, deuterium, and tritium), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs: CFC-11, CCl3F; CFC-12, CCl2F2; and CFC-113, C2Cl3F3), and solute tracers were used to investigate groundwater flow patterns near Lake Barco, a seepage lake in a mantled karst setting in northern Florida. Stable isotope data indicated that the groundwater downgradient from the lake contained 11-67% lake water leakage, with a limit of detection of lake water in groundwater of 4.3%. The mixing fractions of lake water leakage, which passed through organic-rich sediments in the lake bottom, were directly proportional to the observed methane concentrations and increased with depth in the groundwater flow system. In aerobic groundwater upgradient from Lake Barco, CFC-modeled recharge dates ranged from 1987 near the water table to the mid 1970s for water collected at a depth of 30 m below the water table. CFC-modeled recharge dates (based on CFC-12) for anaerobic groundwater downgradient from the lake ranged from the late 1950s to the mid 1970s and were consistent with tritium data. CFC-modeled recharge dates based on CFC-11 indicated preferential microbial degradation in anoxic waters. Vertical hydraulic conductivities, calculated using CFC-12 modeled recharge dates and Darcy's law, were 0.17, 0.033, and 0.019 mid for the surficial aquifer, intermediate confining unit, and lake sediments, respectively. These conductivities agreed closely with those used in the calibration of a three-dimensional groundwater flow model for transient and steady state flow conditions

Environmental Isotopes in Hydrogeology, 1997, Clark I. D. , Fritz P.


Environmental Isotopes, 1998, Moser H.

Use of hydrochemistry and environmental isotopes for evaluation of groundwater in the Paleogene limestone aquifer of the Ras Al-Ain area (Syrian Jezireh), 2001, Kattan Zuhair,

Identifying the flow systems in a karstic-fissured-porous aquifer, the Schneealpe, Austria, by modelling of environmental O-18 and H-3 isotopes, 2002, Maloszewski P. , Stichler W. , Zuber A. , Rank D. ,
The Schneealpe karst massif of Triassic limestones and dolomites with the altitude up to 1800 m a.s.l., situated 100 km SW of Vienna in Kalkalpen, is the main drinking water resource for the city. The catchment area of about 23 km(2) is drained by two springs: the Wasseralmquelle (196 Vs) and the Siebenquellen (310 1/s). This karstic aquifer is approximated by two interconnected parallel flow systems of: (a) a fissured-porous aquifer, and (b) karstic channels. The fissured-porous aquifer is of a high storage capacity and contains mobile water in the fissures and stagnant water in the porous matrix. The water enters this system at the surface and flows through it to drainage channels, which are regarded as a separate flow system, finally drained by both springs. The channels are also connected with sinkholes, which introduce additional water directly from the surface, Measurements of O-18 and tritium in precipitation and springs were modelled by a combined application of lumped-parameter models. Modelling yielded information on the mean values of the following hydraulic parameters: (1) The volume of water in the whole catchment area is 255 X 10(6) m(3), of which about 1.8 X 10(6) m(3) are in channels and 253 X 10(6) m(3) in the fissured-porous aquifer. (2) The total volumetric flow rate is 506 1/s, of which 77 1/s comprises direct flow from sinkholes to springs and 429 1/s are contributed to fissured-porous aquifer. (3) As the volume of the massif is 16.6 x 10 m(3), the total water saturated porosity (fissures and micropores of the matrix) is 1.5% and the channel porosity is about 0.01%. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved

Stable isotope (H-2, O-18 and Sr-87/Sr-86) and hydrochemistry monitoring for groundwater hydrodynamics analysis in a karst aquifer (Gran Sasso, Central Italy), 2005, Barbieri M, Boschetti T, Petitta M, Tallini M,
This paper deals with chemical and isotope analyses of 21 springs, which were monitored 3 times in the course of 2001; the monitoring program was focused on the groundwater of the Gran Sasso carbonate karst aquifer (Central Italy), typical of the mountainous Mediterranean area. Based on the hydrogeological setting of the study area, 6 groups of springs with different groundwater circulation patterns were distinguished. The hydrogeochemistry of their main components provided additional information about groundwater flowpaths, confirming the proposed classification. The spatial distribution of their ion concentrations validated the assumptions underlying the hydrogeological conceptual model, showing diverging groundwater flowpaths from the core to the boundaries of the aquifer. Geochemical modelling and saturation index computation elucidated water-carbonate rock interaction, contribution by alluvial aquifers at the karst aquifer boundaries, as well as impacts of human activities. The analysis of O-18/O-16 and H-2/H values and their spatial distribution in the aquifer substantiated the hydrogeology-based classification of 6 groups of springs, making it possible to trace back groundwater recharge areas based on mean isotope elevations; the latter were calculated by using two rain monitoring stations. Sr-87/Sr-86 analyses showed seasonal changes in many springs: in winter-spring, the changes are due to inflow of new recharge water, infiltrating into younger rocks and thus increasing (87)sr/Sr-86 values; in summer-autumn, when there is no recharge and spring discharge declines, changes are due to base flow groundwater circulating in more ancient rocks, with a subsequent drop in Sr-87/Sr-86 values. The results of this study stress the contribution that spatio-temporal isotope monitoring can give to the definition of groundwater flowpaths and hydrodynamics in fissured and karst aquifers, taking into account their hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical setting. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

Submarine and coastal karstic groundwater discharges along the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey, 2010, Bayari Serdar C. , Ozyurt Nur N. , Oztan Mehmet, Bastanlar Yalin, Varinlioglu Guzden, Koyuncu Hayati, Ulkenli Haldun, Hamarat Serdar

A 120 km-long part of the southwestern coast of Turkey, with well-developed karst terrain in contact with the sea, has been investigated by systematic diving surveys to determine the submarine groundwater discharges (SGDs). The physical, chemical and isotopic data have been used to determine the rate of the fresh groundwater end member (FEM) and its temporal dynamics. About 150 SGDs have been detected by diving
surveys employed mostly up to a depth of 30 m below sea level (bsl). Among those, 15 SGDs are in the form of coastal or submarine caves with entrances ranging between sea surface and 40 m bsl. The FEM contribution in SGDs ranges from a few percent to more than 80%. Stable isotope data suggest a range of mean recharge area elevations extending from the coast to more than 1,000 m inland. In many of the SGDs, the FEMs are characterized by tritium-based residence times ranging from recent to several decades. Hypothetical geochemical calculations of mixing between freshwater and seawater end members reveal that more than 45% of freshwater contribution is required for karst development in the SGDs. Models suggest a threshold pH of 7.6 or lower for the carbonate
rock dissolution.


Submarine and coastal karstic groundwater discharges along the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey, 2011, Bayari C. Serdar, Ozyurt N. Nur, Oztan Mehmet, Bastanlar Yalin, Varinlioglu Guzden

A 120 km-long part of the southwestern coast of Turkey, with well-developed karst terrain in contact with the sea, has been investigated by systematic diving surveys to determine the submarine groundwater discharges (SGDs). The physical, chemical and isotopic data have been used to determine the rate of the fresh groundwater end member (FEM) and its temporal dynamics. About 150 SGDs have been detected by diving surveys employed mostly up to a depth of 30 m below sea level (bsl). Among those, 15 SGDs are in the form of coastal or submarine caves with entrances ranging between sea surface and 40 m bsl. The FEM contribution in SGDs ranges from a few percent to more than 80%. Stable isotope data suggest a range of mean recharge area elevations extending from the coast to more than 1,000 m inland. In many of the SGDs, the FEMs are characterized by tritium-based residence times ranging from recent to several decades. Hypothetical geochemical calculations of mixing between freshwater and seawater end members reveal that more than 45% of freshwater contribution is required for karst development in the SGDs. Models suggest a threshold pH of 7.6 or lower for the carbonate rock dissolution. 


Evaluation of recharge processes and flow dynamics in a karst complex system by using environmental isotopes and chemical characteristics of waters, 2013, Barber Juan Antonio, Andreo Bartolom, Hartmann Andreas, Lange Jens

Characterisation of the gravitational flow system in the Buda Thermal Karst, Hungary, by environmental isotopes, 2013, Frizs Istvn, Dek Jzsef

Evaluation of recharge processes and flow dynamics in a karst complex system by using environmental isotopes and chemical characteristics of waters, 2013, Juan Antonio Barber, Andreo Bartolom, Hartmann Andreas, Lange Jens

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