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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That spring, submarine is 1. a spring emerging in a sea or lagoon predominantly in karst terranes. this is a descriptive term generally corresponding to the genetic term `drowned spring [20].' 2. large offshore emergence, generally from cavernous limestone, but in some areas from beds of lava [10]. synonyms: (french.) source sous marine; (german.) untermeeresquelle, grundquelle, submarine quelle; (greek.) ypothalassia pighi; (italian.) sorgente sottomarina; (russian.) submarinny istocnik; (spanish.) fuente submarina; (turkish.) denizalti kaynagi; (yugoslavian.) vrulja. see spring, drowned.?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for thermal springs (Keyword) returned 26 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 26
Karst hydrogeology of the Canadian Rocky Mountains, PhD Thesis, 1991, Worthington, Stephen Richard Hurst

An analysis of the discharge and hydrochemical variations of contrasting springs at Crowsnest Pass showed they were part of a vertical hierarchy in the aquifer, in which underflow and overflow components play a dominant role. It was found that karst springs at Crowsnest Pass and elsewhere show a range between two end members. Thermal springs have long, deep flow paths, with high sulphate concentrations, low discharge variance and low flow velocities. Overflow springs have local shallow flow paths, low sulphate, high discharge variance, and high flow velocities. Intermediate between these end members are underflow springs; in the Rocky Mountains these are mostly aggraded, and give the sustained winter flow and high sulphate concentrations found in major rivers. It was found that underflow or overflow behaviour is able to explain most of the contrasts found between karst springs in discharge and sulphate concentrations. Conversely, differences in bicarbonate concentration are principally due to the ratio of allogenic to autogenic recharge to the aquifer. Hydraulic analysis showed that gradients decrease in the downstream direction, and are typically 0.0001-0.05 at maximum discharges, that friction factors vary by a factor of $>$1000, and that most active conduits have closed-channel flow and are in dynamic equilibrium with sediment supply. The analysis of the hydrological data from Crowsnest Pass and elsewhere has led to the development of a new conceptual model for groundwater flow in karst, in which the Hagen-Poiseuille flow net conditions the aquifer for conduit development, and determines where the conduits will be. The model explains why most conduits are in dynamic equilibrium with sediment supply, why temperate karst springs are mostly vauclusian, what the mean time for speleogenesis is, how $>$98% of the solution of limestone is in the surficial zone, and why there are karstic hot springs in the Rocky Mountains and elsewhere. The model enables predictions to be made of sink to resurgence flow velocities, of conduit depth below the water table, of the ratio of beds to joints used by conduits, of the spacing between cave tiers, and of the depth of vauclusian springs. This new understanding of how karstic aquifers develop and function gives a powerful predictive ability to karst hydrogeology.


Radiocarbon concentration and origin of thermal Karst waters in the region of the Bukk Mountains, northeastern Hungary, 1995, Hertelendi E. , Veres M. , Futo I. , Svingor E. , Miko L. , Lenart L. , Deak J. , Suveges M. ,
Karst springs are abundant in Hungary, and many are thermal (temperatures >30 degrees C). As thermal springs are a significant part of Hungary's water resources, it is important to quantify their travel times in the karst systems. Thus, we chose to measure T and delta(18)O in the water and delta(13)C and C-14 in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in water from 50 thermal and nonthermal springs and wells in the Bukk Mountains, northeastern Hungary, Environmental isotope data confirm the karst waterflow pattern implied by earlier studies. We found the water in warm springs and boreholes to be mixtures of cold young and old thermal water. We also determined short mean-residence times for some large cold springs. The C-14 activities measured in these springs indicate that the recharge area of the karst aquifer is open to the atmosphere, and atmospheric CO2 contributes to the C-14 activity of these groundwaters. We observed good correlation between C-14 and H-3 activities and we determined negative correlations between C-14 concentration and delta(13)C values and temperature. From the delta(18)O values of the oldest thermal waters, we attribute their origin to precipitation during colder temperatures than at present

Pamukkale (Hirapolis) : un site de travertins hydrothermaux exceptionnel de Turquie, 2002, Nicod, Jean
Pamukkale (Hierapolis): An outstanding site of hydrothermal travertines in Turkey - These travertines result from the deposit of carbonates near the hydrothermal springs, on the main active fault zone on the northern border of the Denizli basin (W Turkey). Their high mineralised water, rich of CO2 of geothermal origin, accumulate limestone in the fissure ridges and in the cascades on the front of the old travertines balcony, building up in it flowstone and rimstone dams. This site is particularly important as much for the archaeological and palaeoenvironmental researches as the palaeoseismic and neotectonics regional data.

Is the water still hot? Sustainability and the thermal springs at Bath, England, 2002, Atkinson Tc, Davison Rm,
The hot springs at Bath are the largest natural thermal source in Britain. Sustainable use of the waters for a spa requires maintenance of their temperature and flow rate. Together with smaller springs at Hotwells, Bristol, they form the outflow from a regional thermal aquifer that occurs where the Carboniferous Limestone is buried at depths > 2.7 km in the Bristol-Bath structural basin. The aquifer is recharged via limestone outcrops forming the south and west portions of the basin rim. Current knowledge of the basin's structure is reviewed, and important uncertainties identified concerning the hydrogeological role of thrust faults which may cut the limestone at depth. A simple numerical model is used to determine the possible influence of thrusts upon groundwater flow within the thermal aquifer. Comparison of the modelled flow patterns with geochemical data and structure contours eliminates the hypothesis that thrusts completely disrupt the continuity of the aquifer. The most successful model is used to simulate the possible impact of dewatering by large quarries at the limestone outcrops north and south of Bath. Substantial reductions in modelled flow at Bath result from proposed dewatering in the eastern Mendips, although the steady-state approach adopted has severe limitations in that it does not take account of the incremental staging of actual dewatering, nor allow for partial restitution of groundwater levels. The geological uncertainties highlighted by the modelling could be addressed by future research into the effect of thrusts on the continuity of the Carboniferous Limestone. More refined modelling to predict the timing of possible impacts of quarry dewatering will require measurements of the storativity of the thermal aquifer

Traage entre le lac de barrage de Salanfe et les sources thermales de Val dIlliez (Valais, Suisse) : tectonique, lithologie et gothermie, 2003, Sesiano, Jean
Dye tracing between the lake of Salanfe and thermal springs of Val dIlliez (Wallis, Switzerland): tectonics, lithology and geothermics - A detailed fieldwork has allowed us to locate a sinkhole where some water from the artificial lake of Salanfe disappears. Two dye tracing experiments have proved the link with hot springs in Val dIlliez, 9 km to the NW. The temperature increase is due to the depth the water reaches before coming up, following an alpine inverse fault.

The geochemistry of fluids from an active shallow submarine hydrothermal system: Milos island, Hellenic Volcanic Arc, 2005, Valsamijones E. , Baltatzis E. , Bailey E. H. , Boyce A. J. , Alexander J. L. , Magganas A. , Anderson L. , Waldron S. , Ragnarsdottir K. V. ,
Geothermal activity in the Aegean island of Milos (Greece), associated with island-arc volcanism, is abundant both on-and off-shore. Hydrothermal fluids venting from several sites, mainly shallow submarine (up to 10 m), but also just above seawater level in one locality, were sampled over four summer field seasons. Some of the discharging fluids are associated with the formation of hydrothermal edifices. Overall, the main characteristics of the hydrothermal fluids are low pH and variable chlorinity. The lowest recorded pH was 1.7, and chlorinity ranged from 0.1 to 2.5 times that of seawater. The highest fluid temperatures recorded on site were 115 degrees C. Two main types of fluids were identified: low-chlorinity fluids containing low concentrations of alkalis (potassium, lithium, sodium) and calcium, and high concentrations of silica and sulphate; and high-chlorinity fluids containing high concentrations of alkalis and calcium, and lower concentrations of silica and sulphate. The type locality of the high-chlorinity fluids is shallow submarine in Palaeochori, near the cast end of the south coast of the island, whereas the type locality of the low-chlorinity fluids is a cave to the west of Palaeochori. The two fluid types are therefore often referred to as 'submarine' and 'cave' fluids respectively. Both fluid types had low magnesium and high metal concentrations but were otherwise consistently different from each other. The low-chlorinity fluids had the highest cobalt, nickel, aluminium, iron and chromium (up to 1.6 mu M, 3.6 mu M, 1586 mu M, 936 mu M and 3.0 mu M, respectively) and the high-chlorinity fluids had the highest zinc, cadmium, manganese and lead (up to 4.1 mu M, 1.0 mu M, 230 mu M and 32 mu M, respectively). Geochemical modelling suggests that metals in the former are likely to have been transported as sulphate species or free ions and in the latter as chloride species or free ions. Isotopic values for both water types range between delta D -12 to 33 parts per thousand and delta(18)O 1.2 to 4.6 parts per thousand. The range of fluid compositions and isotopic contents indicates a complex history of evolution for the system. Both types of fluids appear to be derived from seawater and thus are likely to represent end members of a single fluid phase that underwent phase separation at depth. Crown Copyright (c) 2005 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

Hydrochemic characteristics and tectonic situation of selected springs in central and NW Yunnan province, China., 2006, ebela S. , Kogovek J.
The Province lies on the eastern rim of the collision zone between the Indian plate and Eurasia. This region is characterized by complex Cenozoic structures and active seismotectonics. In the year 2004 the areas north from Kunming and the NW part of were studied. The measurements of the temperature, conductivity and the analyses of carbonate, phosphate and nitrate were performed in Quinglongtan spring and in the accumulation lake that is situated lower than the spring. The springs are situated in the wider zone of the Xiaojiang fault along which left horizontal movements are taking place. Along the wider zone of the Zhongdian fault between the town of Zhongdian and the River on the south there are more springs. Tiansheng Qiao (T = 57.5C) and Xiageiwenquan (T = 48,3 ? 66.8C) are thermal springs along which tufa is deposited. The Baishuitai spring has high mineralization and lower temperature (T = 11.1 ? 13.3C) and deposits calcium carbonate in the form of gours. All studied springs are connected with active fault zones. The studied areas mostly represent the contact areas between carbonate and non-carbonate rocks.

Le karst du dme anticlinal dAix-les-Bains : nouvelles donnes sur le panache hydrothermal, 2006, Gallino Stphanie
The karst of the anticlinal dome of Aix-les-Bains: New data on the hydrothermal plume - The springs Alun and Soufre open on the west side of the Aix-les-Bains anticline. The waters rise from 2200 m in depth and have traversed, through vertical joints, 1700m of limestones and the karstified Urgonien strata. This last rock layer causes a divergence in flow, because there are two springs, either clearly hydrothermal, or having hydrothermal characteristics, within 300 m in distance. The aim of this study is to show the relationship that may exist between these springs by tracing experiments, and thus to get an idea about the circulation in the terminal parts of the system. The tracing experiment shows a physical connection between the Alun and Soufre springs and a thermal sump called Therminator. It also allows to localize the upflow tube to be between Therminator and Alun.

Deep groundwater flow and geochemical processes in limestone aquifers: evidence from thermal waters in Derbyshire, England, UK, 2006, John Gunn, Simon H. Bottrell, David J. Lowe, Stephen R. H. W. ,

Thermal waters potentially provide information on geochemical processes acting deep within aquifers. New isotopic data on groundwater sulphate, inorganic carbon and strontium in thermal and non-thermal waters of a major limestone aquifer system in Derbyshire, England, UK, are used to constrain sulphate sources and groundwater evolution. Shallow groundwaters gain sulphate from oxidation of sulphide minerals and have relatively 13C-depleted dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Thermal waters have relatively high Sr/Ca and more 13C-enriched DIC as a result of increased water–rock interaction. In other respects, the thermal waters define two distinct groups. Thermal waters rising at Buxton have higher Mg, Mn and 87Sr/86Sr and lower Ca and SO4, indicating flow from deep sandstone aquifers via a high permeability pathway in the limestone. By contrast, Matlock-type waters (97% of the thermal flux) have elevated sulphate concentrations derived from interaction with buried evaporites, with no chemical evidence for flow below the limestone. About 5% of the limestone area’s groundwater flows to the Matlock group springs via deep regional flow and the remainder flows via local shallow paths to many non-thermal springs. Gypsum dissolution has produced significant tertiary porosity and tertiary permeability in the carbonate aquifer and this is an essential precursor to the development of karstic drainage.


Hydrogeology of the Brassington area, Derbyshire, UK, 2007, Gunn, Trevor D Ford And John.
The subterranean drainage of the partly dolomitized Carboniferous Limestone of Brassington Moor is deduced to be mainly via mineral vein fissures in both limestones and dolomites. Some of the drainage remains close to the water table and resurges without any rise of temperature, whereas other drainage circulates at depth and returns as thermal springs. Before the late 18th century drainage probably resurged at springs in the Via Gellia but these are largely inoperative having been dewatered by man-made lead mine drainage levels (soughs). Although a limited flow still comes from Cromford Sough, this in turn has been largely dewatered by the lower Meerbrook Sough, which discharges a mix of both cold and thermal waters.

The polygenetic caves of Cuatro Cinegas (Coahuila, Mexico): Morphology and speleogenesis, 2007, Piccini Leonardo, Forti Paolo, Giulivo Italo And Mecchia Marco
The Cuatro Cinegas area is renown worldwide for its thermal springs, which feed a unique ecosystem consisting of many pools, lakes and marshes. The pools also represent a very important water resource in a region characterized by scarce rainfalls. Field investigation has emphasized the role of karst in the hydrogeology of the area. Only few and restricted forms of surface karst are represented; caves are mainly relics of old speleogenetic phases of thermal and bathyphreatic water flow.

A proposed conceptual model for the genesis of the Derbyshire thermal springs, 2007, Brassington Fc,
Ten thermal springs occur in seven centres in Derbyshire, England, with temperatures up to 27.5 {degrees}C compared with an ambient groundwater temperature of about 9 {degrees}C. The springs discharge from a karstic Dinantian limestone aquifer along the boundary with the overlying Namurian strata around the edge of a regional dome structure. The water is heated by deep circulation to as much as 1 km, with the hottest spring being at Buxton spring, where the water is 5000 years old. A comparison of flow data from the Buxton spring with groundwater hydrographs shows seasonality in the thermal flows, suggesting that the loading effects produced by recharge are transmitted through this deep aquifer system. From a review of the geological history and the hydrogeology and the use of measurements on the Buxton spring it is suggested that the thermal flow system may have its roots in ancient convection cells possibly established in the deeply buried aquifer in late Carboniferous-Early Permian times. Subaerial erosion during the Pliocene removed the impermeable cap rocks and allowed both the thermally heated water to form warm springs and this deep groundwater circulation to be recharged by meteoric waters. The location of the individual springs is likely to date from the downcutting during the Late Pleistocene that formed the modern river valley topography

The polygenetic caves of Cuatro Cinegas (Coahuila, Mexico): morphology and speleogenesis., 2007, Piccini Leonardo, Forti Paolo, Giulivo Italo, Mecchia Marco
The Cuatro Cinegas area is renown worldwide for its thermal springs, which feed a unique ecosystem consisting of many pools, lakes and marshes. The pools also represent a very important water resource in a region characterized by scarce rainfalls. Field investigation has emphasized the role of karst in the hydrogeology of the area. Only few and restricted forms of surface karst are represented; caves are mainly relics of old speleogenetic phases of thermal and bathyphreatic water flow.

The polygenetic caves of Cuatro Ciénegas (Coahuila, Mexico): Morphology and speleogenesis., 2007, Piccini L. , Forti P. , Giulivo I. , Mecchia M.

The Cuatro Ciénegas area is renown worldwide for its thermal springs, which feed a unique ecosystem consisting of many pools, lakes and marshes. The pools also represent a very important water resource in a region characterized by scarce rainfalls. Field investigation has emphasized the role of karst in the hydrogeology of the area. Only few and restricted forms of surface karst are represented; caves are mainly relics of old speleogenetic phases of thermal and bathyphreatic water flow.


Discussion of A proposed conceptual model for the genesis of the Derbyshire thermal springs by F.C. Brassington, Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology, 40, 3546, 2008, Bottrell S. , Lowe D. , Gunn J. , Worthington S.


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