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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That sea cave is 1. a cave cut in any rock type where a geological weakness is exploited by the highly selective erosion power of wave action. fingal's cave, cut in the basalt of staffa, scotland, is a famous example. true sea caves should not be confused with dissolutional caves that pre-dated the wave action but were then intersected and revealed as a cliff line was eroded back such as caves in the chalk at beachy head in south-east england. in some young tropical islands, dissolutional voids have formed below sea-level in the mixing zone between fresh and saline ground water. some have subsequently been tectonically uplifted into a shoreline position, to give the misleading impression of having developed due to waver action. caves of this type on the coast of tongatapu, tonga, have pools that connect with active dissolutional cavities below sea-level that might be related to the mixing zone [9]. 2. a cave or cleft in a sea cliff or coastal karst outcrop eroded by waves or currents or dissolved by circulating ground water [20]. synonyms: (french.) grotte marine; (german.) kustenhohle, meereshohle; (greek.) thalassion spelson - paraktion speleon; (italian.) grotta marina; (russian.) morskaja pescera; (spanish.) cueva marina; (turkish.) deniz magarasi; (yugoslavian.) morska pecina (spilja). see cave. compare nip. see also littoral zone.?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for upper jurassic (Keyword) returned 29 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 29
Traits gnraux de l'hydrologie karstique en Basse Cvenne, 1984, Fabre, G.
GENERAL FEATURES OF KARSTIC HYDROLOGY IN BASSE CEVENNE (FRANCE) - N to the town of Als (SE Massif Central and Cvennes), a very fractured carbonated belt outcrops. The karst concerns some facies of Trias, Lias-Dogger, Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous. Karstic flows are of two types: toward W, convergent to the important springs of la Tour-Dauthunes, and toward E and divergent. Ggeneral characteristics are presented. Economic aspect is pointed out, just as karstic stream piracy.

Le karst du compartiment oriental de la basse Cvenne carbonate (Gard), 1988, Martin, Ph.
The karst of the Eastern compartment of the carbonated Lower Cvenne (Gard) - This text summarises 10 years of exploration and study of the eastern karst of the Gardon river basin above Als. Karst concerns 5 facies: Trias, Hettangian-Sinemurian (rich in limonite and pyrites), Upper Bajocian - Lower Bathonian (rich in pyrites), Upper Jurassic and Barremian. This lager is broken into more or less rolling panels, which have collapsed towards the Als rift. Tridimensional systems draining this karst are considered to be evolving toward better performance. It is a remarkable case of natural organisation. Structure is deduced from function. A morphologic approach explains the systems history. Three of the four identified karstic systems are simple. They are partial a natural models of the fourth: the Fonts karstic system. We describe on detail some elements of its structure (caves for ex.) and of its functio-ning (hydrodynamic, hydrochemistry). We show through pumping that the Cauvel river feeds the Fonts spring and the Carabiole spring. The effect of geological and geomorphologic characteristics of the spring site on water output is mentioned. We describe the realisation of a pumping station driving subterranean Cauvel river water a 100m back and point out the usefulness of speleological information.

Le karst nivernais : aperu gomorphologique et hydrogologique, 1989, Couturaud A. , Orange A.
The Nivre karst: geomorphologic and hydrogeologic considerations - Western part of Burgundy and southern part of the Paris basin, the Nivernais karst takes from both regions their lithologic and structural features: Middle and Upper Jurassic carbonate formations, monocline structure with horsts and grabens. But its particularity is in the thick superficial formations, that are supporting a wide mantle of forest, and that determine its morphology, its hydrodynamic and its hydrochemistry. The karst area is distinguished by closed depressions and by the abundance of valleys. The penetrable cavities are scarce and of a little extension, and are principally underground streams. The study of the hydrodynamic and the chemistry of some springs have shown the complexity and the variability of the dynamic of the karstic systems that depends essentially on the superficial formations.

Les surfaces karstiques du plateau de Montrieux (Var), tude quantitative de la fracturation, 1990, Blanc J. J. , Nicod J.
THE KARSTIC SURFACES OF MONTRIEUX PLATEAU (VAR) - Statistical analysis of the jointing. Network jointing analysis in relation to the karstic areas with dolomitized Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous limestones (Valbelle, Montrieux and Morieres forest). Statistical results show some networks and tectonic occurrences correlated with an anisotropic status. Stresses repartition in space and time are linked to an ancient polygenic evolution. Data treatment outputs mark some relations with the quantitative spectrum of jointing extension, dolomitic surface morphology and eventual water drains.

KIMMERIDGIAN TITHONIAN EUSTACY AND ITS IMPRINTS ON CARBONATE ROCKS FROM THE DINARIC AND THE JURA CARBONATE PLATFORMS, 1991, Strohmenger C. , Deville Q. , Fookes E. ,
The Upper Jurassic stratigraphy and the facies development of the Dinaric carbonate platform of Slovenia (northwest Yugoslavia) are compared with the Jura carbonate platform of southern Jura (southeast France). The similar facies development between the two platforms during the Kimmeridgian and the Tithonian, as well as a pronounced discontinuity in the same stratigraphical position (controlled by dasycladacean algae and/or ammonites), made it reasonable to correlate the two regions. This discontinuity is marked by a bauxite horizon and a karst breccia in south Slovenia (inner platform), and by a black-pebble conglomerate (inner platform) and a reef breccia (outer platform) in the southern Jura. These features are interpreted as type 1 sequence boundaries related to a global fall of sea level. In southern Jura, biostratigraphical elements situate the sequence boundary between the Eudoxus and the <> ( = Elegans) zones, most probably at the end of the Beckeri ( = Autissiodorensis) zone. Integrating this discontinuity into the eustatic sea level curve proposed by the Exxon group (version 3.1) is difficult because the only suitable sequence boundaries, SB 139 and SB 142, are respectively too young (younger than the <> zone) or too old (older than the Eudoxus zone). We therefore suggest to introduce a new sequence boundary within the upper part of the Beckeri zone which would correspond to a <> sequence boundary SB 140. The investigations further show that Clypeina jurassica FAVRE and Campbelliella striata (CAROZZI) BERNIER most likely appear in the Beckeri zone in the realm of the Jura carbonate platform. The same dasycladacean algae assemblage defines a cenozone identified as <> in Slovenia. It therefore seems possible to correlate the stratigraphic limit between <> and <> of the Dinaric carbonate platform with the beginning of the Beckeri zone

Response of an underground water horizon of the Upper Jurassic water level of the Cracow-Cz?stochowa Upland to melt water charge. [in Polish], 1993, Leszkiewicz Jan, R?kowski Jacek, Tyc Andrzej

Origin of the Danube-Aach system, 1996, Hotzl H. ,
The Swabian Alb formed by an Upper Jurassic carbonate sequence is the most extensive karst area of Germany. The western part is crossed by the upper Danube River. It represents an old, mainly Pliocene, drainage system that is now restricted by the young Rhine system. The low base level of the upper Rhine graben causes a strong headward erosion. Since the Upper Pliocene, the Danube has lost more than 90%, of its headwaters. The underground Danube-Aach karst system of the western Alb represents the last capture of the Rhine, leading periodically to a complete loss of water in the upper Danube. The seepage of this water, together with the huge karst catchment area, supplies the strong discharge of the Aach Spring, forming the largest spring of Germany with an average discharge of 8.5 m(3) s(-1)

Endangering of the Upper Jurassic karst-fissured aquifer in the Krakow Upland (southern Poland), 1998, R_ Zkowski,

Ancient helictites and the formation of vadose crystal silt in upper Jurassic carbonates (Southern Germany), 1998, Reinhold C. ,
Speleothems and vadose crystal silt are effective indications for karstification processes in the fossil record. Upper Jurassic limestones in Southern Germany that have undergone vadose diagenesis contain on crystal margins and tips of coarse bladed calcites numerous fibrous calcite crystals, formed by abnormal growth conditions, and internal sediment within fractures and vugs, Fibrous calcite crystals grew as crusts, in fence and mesh-like arrangements. Fibrous crystals, which have a length:width ratio of greater than 1:10, are made up of stacked subcrystals composed of an alternation of hexagonal prisms and rhombohedra, They exhibit a central to somewhat eccentric capillary. Electron probe microanalysis shows low-Mg calcite mineralogy with negligible amounts of Fe, Mn, and Sr as well as dis seminated clay and metal hydroxide impurities. Stable-isotope data show relatively C-13-enriched and O-18-depleted values (delta(13)C similar to parts per thousand PDB, delta(18)O similar to -6 parts per thousand PDB), suggesting a meteoric environment and CO2 degassing as the main process of formation, Fibrous calcite crystals form from capillary fluids that are highly supersaturated with respect to calcium carbonate, contaminated with alien mineral impurities. The abnormal growth pattern is suggested to be substrate-controlled and attributed to mineral impurities that produce numerous crystallization nuclei. Fibrous calcite crystals are comparable to helictites of the filiform type that are reported only from Quaternary caves. Nevertheless, the diagenetic sequence and oxygen isotope data suggest a Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary age for their formation. The internal sediment consists exclusively of silt-size fragments of fibrous crystals and therefore is comparable to vadose crystal silt. Crystal silt is generated by the erosion of fibrous crystals both by va dose seepage and air currents. This study is the first observation of ancient helictites and related vadose crystal silt, documenting the close relationship between pore ceiling vadose cements and the generation of crystal silt

High-resolution sequence stratigraphic correlation in the Upper Jurassic (Kimmeridgian)-Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian) peritidal carbonate deposits (Western Taurides, Turkey), 1999, Altiner D, Yilmaz Io, Ozgul N, Akcar N, Bayazitoglu M, Gaziulusoy Ze,
Upper Jurassic (Kimmeridgian)- Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian) inner platform carbonates in the Western Taurides are composed of metre-scale upward-shallowing cyclic deposits (parasequences) and important karstic surfaces capping some of the cycles. Peritidal cycles (shallow subtidal facies capped by tidal-Aat laminites or fenestrate limestones) are regressive- and transgressive-prone (upward-deepening followed by upward-shallowing facies trends). Subtidal cycles are of two types and indicate incomplete shallowing. Submerged subtidal cycles are composed of deeper subtidal facies overlain by shallow subtidal facies. Exposed subtidal cycles consist of deeper subtidal facies overlain by shallow subtidal facies that are capped by features indicative of prolonged subaerial exposure. Subtidal facies occur characteristically in the Jurassic, while peritidal cycles are typical for the Lower Cretaceous of the region. Within the foraminiferal and dasyclad algal biostratigraphic framework, four karst breccia levels are recognized as the boundaries of major second-order cycles, introduced for the first time in this study. These levels correspond to the Kimmeridgian-Portlandian boundary, mid-Early Valanginian, mid-Early Aptian and mid-Cenomanian and represent important sea level falls which affected the distribution of foraminiferal fauna and dasyclad flora of the Taurus carbonate platform. Within the Kimmeridgian-Cenomanian interval 26 third-order sequences (types and 2) are recognized. These sequences are the records of eustatic sea level fluctuations rather than the records of local tectonic events because the boundaries of the sequences representing 1-4 Ma intervals are correlative with global sea level falls. Third-order sequences and metre-scale cyclic deposits are the major units used for long-distance, high-resolution sequence stratigraphic correlation in the Western Taurides. Metre-scale cyclic deposits (parasequences) in the Cretaceous show genetical stacking patterns within third-order sequences and correspond to fourth-order sequences representing 100-200 ka. These cycles are possibly the E2 signal (126 ka) of the orbital eccentricity cycles of the Milankovitch band. The slight deviation of values, calculated for parasequences. from the mean value of eccentricity cycles can be explained by the currently imprecise geochronology established in the Cretaceous and missed sea level oscillations when the platform lay above fluctuating sea level. Copyright (C) 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

Mesozoic dissolution tectonics on the West Central Shelf, UK Central North Sea, 1999, Clark Ja, Cartwright Ja, Stewart Sa,
3-D seismic mapping of the Upper Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation on the West Central Shelf in the Central North Sea reveals a complex fault array which is constrained by seismic interpretation and well control to be of late Jurassic/early Cretaceous age. Fault shapes in plan-view range from linear to circular. Linear fault lengths are 200-300 m to 5 km, the strongly curved and circular faults range in diameter from 100-1000 m. Fault trends are apparently random and display no correlation in location or trend with basement (sub-Zechstein) structures. There is, however, a strong link between this fault pattern and the structure of the top Zechstein (top salt) surface. Linear faults occur at the edges of elongate salt walls and the circular faults lie directly above structures which have been interpreted here as tall, steep-sided salt chimneys. The salt chimneys are present only in the thick, elongate minibasins of Triassic sediment which lie between the salt walls. It is argued that salt dissolution controls the timing, location, orientation and shape of the late Jurassic/early Cretaceous faults. A model is provided to account for the development of both salt walls and chimneys. We suggest that early Triassic karstification of the Zechstein evaporites led to development of an array of circular collapse features. During the ensuing episode of Triassic halokinesis which led to minibasin subsidence and salt wall growth, salt passively 'intruded' the circular collapse features within the subsiding minibasins to form narrow salt chimneys. The resulting array of salt walls and chimneys was subject to dissolution during subsequent subaerial exposure and the late Jurassic marine transgression of the basin (creating the observed fault array), prior to sealing of the salt from circulating groundwater by compaction of the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous shales which blanket the area. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved

Vein and Karst Barite Deposits in the Western Jebilet of Morocco: Fluid Inclusion and Isotope (S, O, Sr) Evidence for Regional Fluid Mixing Related to Central Atlantic Rifting, 2000, Valenza Katia, Moritz Robert, Mouttaqi Abdellah, Fontignie Denis, Sharp Zachary,
Numerous vein and karst barite deposits are hosted by Hercynian basement and Triassic rocks of the western Jebilet in Morocco. Sulfur, oxygen, and strontium isotope analyses of barite, combined with fluid inclusion microthermometry on barite, quartz, and calcite were used to reveal the nature and source of the ore-forming fluids and constrain the age of mineralization. The{delta} 34S values of barite between 8.9 and 14.7 per mil are intermediate between the sulfur isotope signatures of Triassic evaporites and Triassic-Jurassic seawater and lighter [IMG]f1.gif' BORDER='0'>, probably derived from the oxidation of dissolved H2S and leaching of sulfides in the Hercynian basement. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of barite between 0.7093 and 0.7130 range between the radiogenic strontium isotope compositions of micaceous shale and sandstone and the nonradiogenic isotopic signature of Triassic to Jurassic seawater and Cambrian limestone. The{delta} 18O values of barite between 11 and 15 per mil (SMOW) support mixing between two or more fluids, including Late Triassic to Jurassic seawater or a water dissolving Triassic evaporites along its flow path, hot basinal, or metamorphic fluids with{delta} 18O values higher than 0 per mil and/or meteoric fluids with{delta} 18O values lower than 0 per mil. The general trend of decreasing homogenization temperatures and initial ice melting temperatures with increasing salinities of H2O-NaCl {} CaCl2 fluid inclusions trapped in barite, quartz, and calcite indicates that a deep and hot basinal fluid with salinities lower than 6 wt percent NaCl equiv might have mixed with a cooler surficial solution with a mean salinity of 20 wt percent NaCl equiv. Calcium was leached from the Cambrian limestone and the clastic and mafic volcanic rocks of the Hercynian basement. Alkali feldspars and micas contained in the Cambrain sandstones provided most of the Ba to the hydrothermal system. Vein and karst deposits are modeled as a two-component mixing process in which the temperature and the S and Sr isotope composition of the end members changed during the 220 to 155 Ma interval. The hot basinal fluid remained volumetrically dominant during the entire mineralization process. Differences in mean S, O, and Sr isotope compositions among the barite families are interpreted as reflecting differences in mineralization age. Most barite deposits formed before the Kimmeridgian, except for north-south-oriented vein barite, karst barite, and barite cement in the conglomeratic Upper Jurassic, which were deposited later, possibly around 155 Ma. Similar genetic processes have been described for late Paleozoic to Mesozoic F-Ba vein deposits in western Europe. The vein and karst barite in the western Jebilet of Morocco reveals a wide-scale regional mineralization event related to Central Atlantic rifting

Influence of contaminated Vistula River water on the groundwater entering the Zakrzowek limestone quarry, Cracow region, Poland, 2000, Motyka J. , Postawa A. ,
Chemical composition of water inflows in the Zakrzowek quarry, developed in fractured and karstified Upper Jurassic limestones, is controlled by infiltration of polluted water from the Vistula River and by infiltrating meteoric water. The river water TDS value is 2.5 g/dm(3). The quarry waters have 0.6-2.0 g/dm(3) TDS. Highly mineralised waters belong to Cl-Na type. With decreasing TDS the percentage of sulphates, calcium, magnesium and hydrocarbonates increases. This seems to result from various processes including dilution of polluted river water, leaching of aquifer rocks, and ion exchange. The transfer time of river water to the quarry is about 100-120 days. Concentration of contaminants contained in the river water declines during the migration through limestones to the quarry

Origin, evolution and residence time of saline thermal fluids (Balaruc springs, southern France): implications for fluid transfer across the continental shelf, 2002, Aquilina L, Ladouche B, Doerfliger N, Seidel Jl, Bakalowicz M, Dupuy C, Le Strat P,
Thermal fluids in the Balaruc-les-Bains peninsula, on the northeastern edge of the Than lagoon (southern France), supply the third largest spa in France. These thermal fluids interact with karst water in the Upper Jurassic aquifer composed of limestone and dolomite, forming two massifs to the east and north of the lagoon. These calcareous formations extend under the western end of the Than lagoon. Geochemical and isotope analyses were carried out in 1996 and 1998 on the thermal wells of the Balaruc-les-Bains peninsula to determine the origin of the thermal fluids and their interaction with subsurface karst water. The thermal fluids are a mixture of karst water and water of marine origin. H-3 and NO3 concentrations show that the proportion of present-day karst water in certain thermal wells is small (<5%), thus enabling us to define a 'pure' thermal end-member. The thermal end-member is itself a mixture of seawater and meteoric paleowater. Ca and Sr concentrations indicate a lengthy interaction with the carbonate substratum of the deep reservoir. Sr isotope signatures are very homogeneous and associated mainly with the dissolution of Jurassic carbonate, but also to evaporitic minerals. delta(13)C contents indicate that this dissolution is linked to deep inflow of CO2. Sr-87, trace element and rare earth element (REE) concentrations indicate that there is also a component, with a systematically minor participation, whose origin is deeper than the Jurassic carbonate and attributed to the Triassic and/or to the crystalline basement. Cl-36 concentrations are extremely low, indicating a residence time of around a hundred thousand years. The outflow temperature of the thermal fluids reaches 50 degreesC, and geothermometers indicate a reservoir temperature of around 80-100 degreesC, locating this aquifer at a depth of between 2000 and 2500 m. The geometry of the geological formations indicates a thrust plane associated with major basement faulting that separates the two calcareous massifs and seems to control the rise of deep thermal fluids from the Jurassic carbonate reservoirs and the participation of a deeper component from the basement and/or the Triassic. The present study shows that seawater can infiltrate at great depths and reside for long periods of time compared to the subsurface groundwater cycle. Compared to other highly saline fluids encountered in basement zones, these waters have a relatively well-preserved marine signature, probably due to the carbonate nature of the aquifer in which the fluids resided and their short residence time. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved

The situation and dynamics of the North Yorkshire windypits: A geophysical and geomorphological investigation, MSc Thesis [Engineering Geology], 2002, Devlin, R.

ub-surface slip-rift fissures and shafts, known locally as 'windypits', are numerous in the Upper Jurassic strata of the Hambleton Hills and Ryedale district of North Yorkshire. Windypits are predominantly open gull-formations, formed as a result of cambering between competent Corallian Group sandstone and limestone beds above weak clay beds of the Oxford Clay Formation. They relate to the natural pattern of steeply-dipping, widened joint-plane discontinuities, with individual blocks of caprock moving relative to one another along these surfaces. The most extensive fissure systems are up to 40m deep and over 300m long, and typically run sub-parallel to slope contours and linear topographic features, rupturing the surface above the line of maximum gradient. More complex and unpredictable structures occur where there is more than one direction of movement, resulting in a radial fissure network. Windypits have been associated with other forms of scarp recession and landslide activity, most notably the formation of unstable block detachments along vertical cliff-exposures. Aerial photographic interpretation and terrain analysis based on field observations and mapping have been used here in a detailed geomorphological investigation of windypit structures and their related landforms. They appear to play a significant role within a far more complex model of superficial slope evolution, with important consequences for rock-slope stability. The potential hazards from landslides and natural cavities are also assessed in the light of engineering geological evaluation. Shallow geophysical surveying techniques have been used to profile the electrical contrasts between void space and host rock, at a number of selected sites. It has been found that non-contacting electromagnetic conductivity methods are unsuitable for producing a discrete windypit anomaly, due to their limited depth of penetration. Tomographic resistivity techniques appear to be the most promising for accurately locating sub-surface fissures, and helping to map their true depth and full extent Comprehensive ground investigation would allow better interpretation of the geophysical data collected.


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