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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That loam is calcareous clay [16].?

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for karst hydrogeology (Keyword) returned 143 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 16 to 30 of 143
Karst hydrogeology of the Canadian Rocky Mountains, PhD Thesis, 1991, Worthington, Stephen Richard Hurst

An analysis of the discharge and hydrochemical variations of contrasting springs at Crowsnest Pass showed they were part of a vertical hierarchy in the aquifer, in which underflow and overflow components play a dominant role. It was found that karst springs at Crowsnest Pass and elsewhere show a range between two end members. Thermal springs have long, deep flow paths, with high sulphate concentrations, low discharge variance and low flow velocities. Overflow springs have local shallow flow paths, low sulphate, high discharge variance, and high flow velocities. Intermediate between these end members are underflow springs; in the Rocky Mountains these are mostly aggraded, and give the sustained winter flow and high sulphate concentrations found in major rivers. It was found that underflow or overflow behaviour is able to explain most of the contrasts found between karst springs in discharge and sulphate concentrations. Conversely, differences in bicarbonate concentration are principally due to the ratio of allogenic to autogenic recharge to the aquifer. Hydraulic analysis showed that gradients decrease in the downstream direction, and are typically 0.0001-0.05 at maximum discharges, that friction factors vary by a factor of $>$1000, and that most active conduits have closed-channel flow and are in dynamic equilibrium with sediment supply. The analysis of the hydrological data from Crowsnest Pass and elsewhere has led to the development of a new conceptual model for groundwater flow in karst, in which the Hagen-Poiseuille flow net conditions the aquifer for conduit development, and determines where the conduits will be. The model explains why most conduits are in dynamic equilibrium with sediment supply, why temperate karst springs are mostly vauclusian, what the mean time for speleogenesis is, how $>$98% of the solution of limestone is in the surficial zone, and why there are karstic hot springs in the Rocky Mountains and elsewhere. The model enables predictions to be made of sink to resurgence flow velocities, of conduit depth below the water table, of the ratio of beds to joints used by conduits, of the spacing between cave tiers, and of the depth of vauclusian springs. This new understanding of how karstic aquifers develop and function gives a powerful predictive ability to karst hydrogeology.


Hydrogeology of the reservoirs planned in Lower Zamanti Basin and karst related problems, 1993, Bayari C. Serdar, Gureri Brahim
This study aims to define the karst related problems that may arise during the implementation of three weir and two dam projects planned in the Lower Zamanti Basin. Based on the regional hydrogeological investi-gations, the problems that may arise during the construction phase were outlined and relevant investigation techniques were proposed. This study showed that no water leakage problem is expected in the reservoir areas of Çamlıca II , Çamlıca III, Tatlar weirs and Göktaş dam, while the possibility of leakage thorugh the reservoir of the Topraktaş dam should be investigated by means of geophysical surveys and exploratory boreholes. The same suggestions are also valid for the energy tunnels of Çamlıca II, Tatlar weirs and Göktaş dam where dewatering of karst groundwater would be an important problem.

Use of hydrologic, hydrochemical and isotopic data in identification of groundwater flow patterns in Lower Zamantı Basin (Eastern Taurids-Turkey), 1993, Bayari Celal Serdar, Gurer Ibrahim
In karst basins where hydraulic structures ARE designed to utilize the existing water potential, determination of the distinct groundwater flow patterns and the inter-relations among them bears great importance from the view point of the geotechnical safety of the structure. The combined use of hydrologic, hydrochemical and isotopic data enables us to identify different groundwater flow patterns prevailing in karst basins. Once the inter-relation among the groundwater flow patterns is established, the decision regarding the implementation of projects will be easier. Hydrologic investigations including analyses of the "stream yield" and "groundwater balance", produce invaluable information that can be used to locate the important karstic effluents along the basin. The study of the hydrochemistry of major karstic effluents reveals reliable information on the "depth" of underground circulation and the "recharge conditions" dominating within the karst system. Evaluation of environmental isotopic data introduces important details pertaining to the "mean recharge area elevations" and "turn-over times" of the karst waters and inter-relation among each other. Sometimes very closely located karstic outflows may have quite different circulation/recharge characteristics. This paper attempts to demonstrate the combined use of hydrologic, hydrochemical and isotopic techniques for the determination of the "deep-regional" and "shallow" groundwater circulation patterns existing in the Lower Zamanti Basin.

POLLUTION OF LIMESTONE AQUIFER DUE TO URBAN WASTE-DISPOSAL AROUND RAIPUR, MADHYA-PRADESH, INDIA, 1994, Bodhankar N, Chatterjee B,
During the rainy season deterioration in the quality of water, supplied through dug wells and tube wells, near an abandoned limestone quarry was reported. The abandoned quarry is now being used as an urban waste disposal site. The problem was further complicated by hospitalization of several inhabitants who were using this water for domestic purposes. Looking into the consequences, chemical analysis of water from the quarry, dug wells and tube wells was carried out. The water was found to be contaminated. The transportation of pollutants from the quarry to the groundwater system was facilitated by karst features. Furthermore, four major sources domestic waste disposal, water conservation structures, landfills, and water wells contributing to pollution were identified. This case study is an attempt to provide an understanding of how the karst features facilitate groundwater contamination. It will help us answer a few questions such as why karst hydrogeology deserves special attention in urban expansion and what protective measures should be planned in view of rapid urbanization

Hydrogeological Aspects of Groundwater Protection in Karstic Areas, Final report (COST Action 65), Report EUR 16547, 1995,

Numerical versus statistical modelling of natural response of a karst hydrogeological system, 1997, Eisenlohr L, Bouzelboudjen M, Kiraly L, Rossier Y,
Structural and hydrodynamic characteristics of karst aquifers are mostly deduced from studies of global responses of karst springs (hydrographs, chemical or isotopic composition). In this case, global response is often used to make inferences with respect to infiltration and ground water How processes as well as on the hydrodynamic parameters. Obviously, the direct verification of these inferences is very difficult. We have used an indirect method of verification, introducing well defined theoretical karst structures into a finite element model and then analysing the simulated global response according to the currently accepted interpretation schemes. As we know what we are introducing into the numeric model, the consistency of the interpretation may be checked immediately. The results obtained in the hydrogeological study of two karst basins in the Swiss Jura and from 2-D and 3-D numerical simulations show the difficulty of finding structural parameters and hydrodynamic behaviour from statistical methods alone, i.e. correlation analyses discharge-discharge and precipitation-discharge. In effect, our first results show that the form of the correlograms depends on several factors besides the structure of the karst aquifer: (i) on the form of the floods. in other words the contrast between quick Row and base How, (ii) on the frequency of hydrological events during the period analysed and (iii) on the type of infiltration processes, in other words the ratio of diffuse infiltration to concentrated information. Obviously, the variability of a karst hydrograph is a result of a combination of these factors. Distinction between them is not always possible on hydrographs, and therefore on correlations (discharge-discharge and precipitation-discharge). (C) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V

Karst hydrogeology of the Kas-Kalkan springs along the Mediterranean coast of Turkey, 1998, Elhatip H, G_ N,

Modeling of storm responses in conduit flow aquifers with reservoirs, 1998, Halihan Todd, Wicks Carol M. ,
In aquifers containing large voids, such as karst aquifers with caves or basaltic aquifers with lava tubes, hydrographs at wells or springs are used to analyze the structure and response of the hydrogeological system. Numerical modeling of hydrograph response is commonly based on either inverse techniques or postulated flow geometries. However, the range of mechanisms for generating hydrograph responses have not been fully investigated.Physical modeling of these complex non-Darcian systems permits better understanding of the storm responses that conduit systems may generate. Using a numerical model of conduit flow systems which incorporates turbulent flow, some of the mechanisms that can alter storm pulses were investigated by treating them as combinations of pipes that connect reservoirs.The results indicate that the response of a conduit-flow aquifer can range from what has been called 'diffuse' or 'steady' to 'conduit' or 'flashy', without employing a diffusive component. A full range of behavior can be the result of changes from phreatic to epiphreatic conditions in a conduit, changes in conduit geometry, or multiple springs draining the same system. The results provide a quantitative tool to assess spring and well hydrographs, and illustrate mechanisms that can generate observed responses, which have previously been qualitatively interpreted

Lutilisation des rserves hydrauliques karstiques : lexemple de la commune de Penne-de-Tarn, 1999, Bou, Claude
Water collecting in the commune of Penne was meant to offer an option to the polluted and scarce water resources of the liasic limestone aquifer layer through a planned and reasonable exploitation of the Jurassic reserves. Three underground streams actually supply the whole commune territory - the largest in the Tarn department - with good water which does not suffer any summer depletion. The civil engineering work, the electro-mechanical fittings, the proper fixtures which followed the preliminary surveys were made by unpaid amateur cavers from several clubs of the caving district committee gathered in the ATEK (Association Tarnaise d'Etudes Karstiques). Different methods and techniques have been used to collect water on the following three sites: - the underground stream of Cabeou and the building of a storage dam of 500 m3 which was put into service in 1984 on the limestone plateau of the Garrigue; - the undergroung stream of Amiel where a 25 meter deep well was drilled through hard rock and which has supplied the village with water since 1985; - and the underground stream of Madeleine whose pumping station protected by a dam has increased the water resources of the right bank of the Aveyron river since 1989.

Rehabilitation of the Lune River Quarry, Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage area, Australia, 1999, Gillieson D. , Household I.

Extractive industries impact, 1999, Hess J. W. , Slattery L. D.

Groundwater saliniza-tion in the Apulia region, southern Italy, 1999, Tulipano L. , Fidelibus M. D.

Storage reservoirs and deep wells in karst regions., 1999, Breznik M.

Karst is a dry landscape situated on a soluble rock mass with an underground flow of water. Ten per cent of the world's landscape consists of karst. During rainy periods, karst valleys and poljes are flooded, whereas in dry periods there is a lack of water.


Perspectives in karst hydrogeology and cavern genesis, 1999, Ford D. C.
Hydrogeology and speleology both began during the 19th CenturyTheir approaches to limestone aquifers diverged because hydrogeologists tend to measure phenomena at very local scales between drilled wells and generalize from them to basin scales, while speleologists study the large but sparse conduits and then infer conditions around themConvergence of the two approaches with modem computing should yield important genetic models of aquifer and caveGenesis of common cave systems by dissolution is a three-dimensional problem, best broken down into two-dimensional pairs for purposes of analysisHistorically, the dimensions of length and depth have received most attention, especially the question of the location of principal cave genesis with respect to the water tableBetween 1900 and 1950, different scientists proposed that caves develop principally (1) in the vadose zone; (2) at random depth in the phreatic zone; (3) along the water table in betweenEmpirical evidence suggests that these differing hypotheses can be reconciled by a four-state model in which the frequency of penetrable fissuration controls the system geometryFor the dimensions of length and breadth (plan patterns) there is widespread agreement that dendritic (or branchwork) patterns predominate in common cavesIrregular networks or anastomose patterns may occur as subsidiary componentsWhen hydraulic conditions in a fissure are anisotropic (the usual case), dissolutional conduit development is competitive: local hydraulic gradients are reoriented toward the first conduits to break through to outlet points, redirecting others toward them in a cascading processPlan patterns are most complex where there have been multiple phases ("levels") of development in a cave system in response to such effects as river channel entrenchment lowering the elevation of springs

Karst Hydrogeology and Human Activities: Impacts, Consequences and Implications, 1999, Na


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