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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

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That bed roughness is the roughness of a channel or river bed [16].?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for morphogenesis (Keyword) returned 45 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 16 to 30 of 45
Are "collapse dolines" formed only by collapse?, 2000, Š, Uš, Terš, Ič, France

The paper concerns collapse dolines, which appear to be one of the best-defined surface karst phenomena. Despite this appearance, one may find quite different views in the literature, and some the aspects of their morphogenesis have been overlooked completely. Among these aspects the most obvious is the question of the ongoing development of the closed depression. After the perpendicular walls have disappeared, the slopes are reshaped only by pocket weathering, and denudation penetrates deep below the former level of the pre-existing cave floor. Dolines at this stage of development have been termed phantom collapse dolines. Five of the most common collapse doline types found in Slovenia are considered in terms of general systems theory, leading to a conclusion that cave roof collapse remains the crucial event in a collapse doline's development. However, the collapse event itself may be relatively subdued in terms of the volume of free fallen mass involved.


Reconstitution morpho_lo_gique du Causse du Larzac (Aveyron, France), rle des formations superficielles dans la morphogense karstique, 2001, Bruxelles, Laurent
The study of post-Jurassic deposits, superficial formations which stay on the plateau or are preserved in caves permits us, together with the morphologies of landscape, to reconstitute the main steps of morphological evolution of this part of the Larzac. In particular, the discovery of numerous witnesses of cretaceous cover, marine and continental, let us know the first morphogenesis of the Grands Causses. After the bauxite episode, coniacian transgression fossilized a differentiated palaeotopography under one hundred meters of sandy limestone. After, the erosion of this deposits and the transit of various alterites, allogene or autochthonous, show further morphological steps. Theses formations can constitute a real cover and contribute to the development of karstic levellings. Residual formations, associated with levels of shelves, regulate lowering of karstic surface between Eocene and Miocene, before the canyon digging and the development of karstic recules. Then, between Miocene and Quaternary, karst declogging changes radically the evolution of the plateau surface and let appear poljes, dolines and underground network. Only some specific areas can keep their cover of alterites and maintain, temporally, an old functioning.

Morphogenesis of the Garlika Shaft in conditions of the contact karst, 2001, Baron, Ivo

The Garlika Shaft is located in at about 2 km long W-E depression in southern part of the Silica Plateau (the Slovak Karst Biosphere Reservation, Slovak Republic). The origin of the Garlika shaft is different than most of the other shafts of the Slovak Karst plateaus. Formerly a sinkhole of an ephemeral stream has developed to the shaft due to several factors. A thin water film corrosion and a wall water stream corrosion extended the former fissure. Then, after the stream decrease, thin water film corrosion and a tectonic breccia crumbling has modelled the deeper parts of the shaft. The entrance part of the shaft has been influenced with frost weathering, corrosion of the condensed water and corrosive action of lichens, moss and rotting organic detritus.


Collapse dolines and deflector faults as indicators of karst flow corridors, 2002, Sustersic France
The paper concerns collapse dolines, which appear to be one of the best-defined surface karst phenomena. Despite this appearance, one may find quite different views in the literature, and some of the aspects of their morphogenesis have been overlooked completely. Among these aspects the most obvious is the question of the ongoing development of the closed depression. Five of the most common collapse doline types found in Slovenia are considered in terms of general systems theory, leading to a conclusion that cave roof collapse remains the crucial event in a collapse doline's development. However, the collapse event itself may be relatively subdued in terms of the of free fallen mass involved. Some types of collapse dolines appear along particular types of faults that function as a kind of screen; these faults are termed deflector faults. They are marked by collapsing within the caves, and by "active" collapse dolines on the surface. Existence of deflector faults is an indicator of flow corridors in the close neighbourhood.

Polyphased uplift and erosion of the Cevennes (southern France). An example of slow morphogenesis, 2002, Seranne Michel, Camus Hubert, Lucazeau Francis, Barbarand Jocelyn, Quinif Yves,
The Cevennes are bordering the French Massif Central and the Gulf of Lion margin. The morphogenesis of this area results from an interaction between deep-seated and superficial processes, whose origin and timing is still discussed. We attempt a reconstruction of the surrection and erosion history of the area through a multidisciplinary approach including geology, geomorphology, thermochronology and geochronology. Thermochronology shows that the Cevennes basement underwent some 2 km denudation in mid-Cretaceous time. Analyses of the sediments preserved on uplifted surfaces and in peripheral sedimentary basins indicate a differential surface uplift of the Cevennes, of the surrounding calcareous plateaus, and of the coastal plain, that occurred in several stages during the Tertiary. Early Miocene rifting of the Gulf of Lion margin and opening of the NW Mediterranean drastically modified the drainage network. Geomorphology analyses of the incised rivers and karst network suggest that most of the incision results from uplift that occurred sometime in the Serravalian-Tortonian interval. U/Th dating of calcite concretions in karsts allows to chronologically bracket the formation of some fluvial terraces, and to find very low incision rates during the Pleistocene. Most of the morphogenesis predates the Quaternary. This ongoing study shows an example of polyphased and very slow morphogenesis, with present-day landscape including elements as old as Cretaceous

Role of epiphreatic flow and soutirages in conduit morphogenesis: the Barenschacht example (BE, Switzerland)., 2003, Hauselmann P. , Jeannin Py. , Monbaron M.

Role of epiphreatic flow and soutirages in conduit morphogenesis: the Barenschacht example (BE, Switzerland), 2003, Hauselmann P. , Jeannin P. Y. , Monbaron M. ,
Role of epiphreatic flow and soutirages in speleogenesis: the Barenschacht example (BE, Switzerland).- Observations in the deep parts of Barenschacht allow the linkage of two existing theories about cave genesis (FORD & EWERS 1978, AUDRA 1994). The transition from vadose canyon to phreatic tube is not observed at the perennial karstwater table, but at the floodwater table. The galleries below all show phreatic morphology despite temporary vadose flow. Therefore, the boundaries of the distinct phases of cave genesis are inclined. In low-water situation, the looping galleries empty through the so-called soutirages. These form through corrosion along discontinuities and are generally found in the epiphreatic realm. The water flowing through the soutirages reaches the perennial watertable and then the spring. It seems possible that the model presented here is also valid for non-alpine caves

Intrt de lapproche morphognique pour la comprhension globale dune grotte haute valeur patrimoniale, la grotte Chauvet (Ardche - France), 2004, Delannoy Jeanjacques, Perrette Yves, Debard Evelyne, Ferrier Catherine, Kervazo Bertrand, Perroux Annesophie, Jaillet Stphane, Quinif Yves
Interest of the morphogenesis approach to improve the knowledge of a high-value heritage: Chauvet cave (Ardche, France) - This paper describes the shapes and cave deposits of the Chauvet cave. Especially, the geomorphologic approach improves the global understanding of the Chauvet cave characteristics while Man and animal prehistoric occupancies. Access to the cave, painting location in the cave, and finally cave closing, are discussed on geomorphologic basis to answer the questions asked by prehistorians and archaeologists. The ultimate goal of this paper is to enhance the contribution of the geomorphologic high resolution mapping to the prehistoric investigations. To answer the three questions above, we used shapes and deposits to relate the past cave environments. Soil detailed map allows to describe deposits and shapes in a stratigraphic approach. Some U/Th dating complete the chronology especially during Man and animal occupancy; thus, the closing of the prehistoric entrance has been dated older than 15000 years. Also, this paper shows the interest of crossing the disciplinary approaches in the understanding of such a complex scientific object: the Chauvet cave, a high value Man heritage

Towards defining, delimiting and classifying epikarst: Its origin, processes and variants of geomorphic evolution, 2004, Klimchouk, A. B.

Epikarst is the uppermost weathered zone of carbonate rocks with substantially enhanced and more homogeneously distributed porosity and permeability, as compared to the bulk rock mass below; a regulative subsystem that functions to store, split into several components and temporally distribute authogenic infiltration recharge to the vadose zone. Permeability organization in the epikarst dynamically develops to facilitate convergence of infiltrating water towards deeply penetrating collector structures such as prominent fissures that drain the epikarstic zone. This is manifested by epikarstic morphogenesis that tends to transform dispersed appearance of surface karst landforms into focused appearance adapted to the permeability structure at the base of epikarst.
Epikarst is the result of combined action of several agencies including stress release, weathering and dissolution. It is a dynamic system which main characteristics are time-variant, changing in a regular way during the epikarst evolution. This paper examines the main characteristics of epikarst in the light of its origin and evolution.


Minor karst landforms as an indirect method for datation- the case study valley Pod Košuto (Slovenia), 2004, Mrak, Irena

The paper presents the Pleistocene morphogenesis research in the valley Pod Košuto. The area was one of the detailed studies in the wider research of the Pleistocene morphogenesis in Tržiška Bistrica river basin. Ice movements influenced the formation of valley Pod Košuto, but the research deals more with the genesis of the carbonate material that fills the right side of the valley. Researching the lithologic characteristics of the material, the measurements of particle roundness and with the help of the minor karst landforms measurements we offer the new view of the material deposition in the secondary - present location.


The role of epikarst in the morphogenesis of the karstic forms, especially hollow forms in Greece, 2004, Papadopoulouvrynioti, Kyriaki

The role of epikarst in the morphogenesis of the subcutaneous karren and the karstic hollow forms is different. Cavernous karren and subcutaneous kluftkarren, are covered with terra rossa and show the activity of water. They are developed in the epikarstic zone due to the diffused corrosion on the joints through a capillary aquifer, situated in the high vadose zone. The rounded tops and the cavities of those subcutaneous karren are formed due to the continuous and uniform corrosion, acting by soil moisture in the high part of the epikarstic zone. Karstic hollowforms are developed in carbonate layers only, and also on the contact of karstified and non-karstified but easily erodable rocks. In this case, a lot of material is produced for the formation of soils that fill these landforms. Uvalas and poljes usually develop in sites of old valleys or tectonic depressions through the process of widening of the joints in the subcutaneous zone and the lowering of the latter zone. Simultaneously there occurs the gradual impermeability of the zone and the reinforcement of the lateral corrosion. These forms are mostly formed above the piezometric level. The poljes - periodical lakes are created due to the development when they temporary reach epikarstic water table.


Morfogenesis of chalk karst in the Volhynia Elevation (NW Ukraine), 2005, Dobrowolski Rados?aw, Bogucki Andrij, Zaleski Iwan

The Montello hill: the "classical karst" of the conglomerate rocks, 2005, Ferrarese Francesco, Sauro Ugo

The Montello hill is, probably, the most typical morphounit between the karsts developed in conglomerate rocks. It may be considered the classical karst of the conglomerates comparable with the Classical Karst of limestones: the Carso of Trieste. The Montello hill consists in an elliptical plan figure, elongated for about 13 km in a WSW-ENE direction and a width of about 5 km. The rock unit involved is the "Conglomerato del Montello" of late Miocene age (Messinian), mostly composed by carbonate pebbles bound by a calcitic cement, which is 2000 m thick. The Montello is shaped by a complex system of fluvial planation and incision forms in which are distinguishable a main plateau and a stairs of seven planation rock cut terraces. The terraces are cut in the slope of a dead antecedent valley. On the fluvial planation forms, dolines, mostly of the drawdown type but also of the point recharge type, have evolved. In total more than 2000 dolines are present. In the seven rock cut terraces the dolines show different development and dimensions according with the ages of the surfaces. In the first morphogenesis of these dolines and of the caves the control of the plan structures as the bedding surfaces and the fractures seems to have been feeble; on the contrary the porosity of the conglomerate has been a determinant factors for the developmente of the karst drainage.


Lithological and morphological characteristic and rock relief of the Lao Hei Gin shilin-stone forest (Lunan, SW China)., 2006, Knez M. , Slabe T.
The Lao Hei Gin stone forest is yet one more of the diverse and famed Lunan stone forests created from subcutaneous karren. The initial morphogenesis of the stone pillars started along almost horizontal bedding planes and mostly sub-vertical faults and cracks already covered by thick layers of sediments and soil. The forests stone pillars stand individually or in groups. The dominant and most characteristic shape of the pillars is mushroom-like, with alternating lithological characteristics of the carbonate beds expressed in a vertical direction.

Zoloushka Cave, 2007, Andreychouk V.

In March 2007 there was a 30th anniversary of a discovery of the Zoloushka (Cinderella) Cave, which is one of the largest gypsum caves in the world. Until now over 90 km of passages of a total volume of 0.65 million m3 have been mapped. The cave was accidentally encountered by the face of a gypsum quarry in 1946, but it was not penetrated by speleologists until 30 years later. From the very beginning of exploration, the cave attracted the attention of many speleologists and later - geographers and geologists. It became a notable supplement to the family of the largest gypsum caves, which were investigated in the area of the neighboring Podolsky (Podolia) region. It appeared however not entirely similar to them: as compared to the cave systems in Podolia the Zoloushka Cave shows more voluminous passages and it is more filled with clayey sediments. The cave passages developed mainly in the upper part of the gypsum layer, which resulted in collapses in many sections. The main feature of the Zoloushka Cave is that it was artificially uncovered (in the quarry face) and it was not accessible until the gypsum layer was drained by pumping out karst water. The quarry exposed rich groundwater reservoir ? a large karst aquifer. Gradual deepening and extension of the quarry caused the increase of outflow rate and the increase of water withdrawal. In the late 1960s, when the most (18-20m) of the gypsum layer (total thickness 24-26 m) was entrenched, the karst system had been already drained. Groundwater, marking the surface of a depression cone, was preserved only in the lowest parts of the cave. The karst system became accessible to investigations. Opening of the Zoloushka maze had interrupted the natural evolution of the hydrogeological settings ? it had occurred in the moment when it was almost totally filled with water. The caves in the Podolia region underwent this stage tens of thousand years earlier. Modern draining and younger age of the Zoloushka Cave determined a specific character of its internal relief (increased moisture of deposits, lack of secondary gypsum formations which are so typical for the Pololian?s caves), and caused different processes to operate (roof subsidence, sediment drying/draining, water flows between different areas, etc.), which accompanied a sudden conversion from water-filled chambers to empty ones. It became clear from the very beginning that the cave is an extremely interesting object from a scientific point of view. The cave provided a unique opportunity to carry out multi-aspect investigations. Many phenomena and features were observed by speleologists for the first time. Morphological features of the cave, such as large cylindrical pits created by rising underground water, evidence undoubtedly a confined origin of the cave system. The morphogenetic studies in the cave have played an important role in understanding problems of karst development in this region and establishing a new (artesian) regional concept of speleogenesis. The abundance of iron-manganese deposits in the cave attracted the attention of geochemists, who determined the presence of numerous geochemical processes which occurred when the cave became drained. The cave made it possible for speleologists to study the mechanisms of sinkhole development, which is extremely important for an adequate understanding and assessment of karst hazards. The cave sediments contain numerous carbonate insertions (lithified fills of relict fissures in gypsum), which make it possible to reconstruct important palaeogeographic, palaeotectonic and palaeokarstic events. During all these years the cave has been well studied. This work represents a kind of summary of all the hitherto achievements and has a general and complex character. Many problems however remained unresolved. Therefore the aim of this work is not only to present general results of the investigations which have been carried out in the Zoloushka Cave, but also to attract the interest of specialists of different fields in order to enlarge and intensify the investigations in the cave itself and its surrounding. The book's twelve chapters deal with history of the cave discovery and study, natural conditions and karst of the region, geological environment of the cave, speleomorphogenesis, morphological structure of the cave network, hydrology, breakdown processes and sinkhole development, cave sediments, cave microclimate, life in the cave, cave genesis and age, scientific and practical importance of the cave.

In Russian, with extended abstract and captions in English and Polish.


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