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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

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That infiltration is the downward entry of water into the soil or rock [22].?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
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Your search for tracer tests (Keyword) returned 60 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 46 to 60 of 60
GEOMETRY AND DRAINAGE OF A RETREATING GLACIER OVERLYING AND RECHARGING A KARST AQUIFER, TSANFLEURON-SANETSCH, SWISS ALPS, 2010, Gremaud V. , Goldscheider N.
Alpine glaciers store large amounts of freshwater contributing to groundwater recharge during warmer periods, but the interactions between glaciers and aquifers have rarely been investigated in detail. The Tsanfleuron-Sanetsch area, Switzerland, is an ideal test site to study glacier-aquifer interactions. It consists of a rapidly retreating glacier (2.8 km2) overlying a karst aquifer drained by a spring (mean discharge 600700 L/s) used for drinking water supply and irrigation. The geometry and structure of the glacier were assessed by means of geophysical surveys, using radiomagnetotellurics (RMT). The estimated ice volume is 1.0 x 10^8 m3 (0.92 x 10^8 m3 water equivalent), but the glacier currently loses 1.5 m ice thickness per year. Field observations, flow measurements and tracer tests allowed characterisation of glacier drainage and aquifer recharge. Three recharge pathways have been identified: 1) The main glacial stream sinks into the aquifer via swallow holes 3 km downstream of the glacier mouth; 2) Numerous small meltwater streams sink underground shortly below the glacier front; 3) Subglacial meltwaters and supraglacial streams sink into the glacier via moulins and contribute to aquifer recharge through fractures and swallow holes underneath the glacier. Recharge and spring discharge display strong diurnal and seasonal variability, with a general highflow period during snow and glacier melt from spring to autumn. Preliminary predictions of the future availability of spring water after disappearance of the glacier suggest that the discharge may decrease by 2030%. Nearly all of this loss will occur in summer and autumn, presumably resulting in temporary water shortage.

TRACER TESTS AS A TOOL FOR PLANNING THE MONITORING OF NEGATIVE IMPACTS OF THE MOZELJ LANDFILL (SE SLOVENIA) ON KARST WATERS, 2010, Kogovek J. , Petri? M.
Tracer tests are one of the most useful research methods in karst hydrogeology and they have proved a valuable tool in various applied projects. In recent years we carried out a series of tracer tests, and their results were used as the bases for planning the monitoring of water quality in the influence areas of various pollution sources. In this paper, a case study of tracing at the landfill near Mozelj in southeastern Slovenia is described. The first goal was testing of the functioning of three monitoring boreholes, which were drilled at the margins of the landfill. As often happens in heterogeneous karst systems, they did not intersect the main flow paths from the landfill and are not suitable as monitoring points. On the other hand, the findings about the characteristics of tracer transport in the karst system and outflow through the karst springs were used for identifying the most suitable springs for monitoring and preparing an adequate sampling plan, which should be adapted to hydrological conditions.

HYDROGEOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE MALEN?ICA KARST SPRING (SW SLOVENIA) BY MEANS OF A TIME SERIES ANALYSIS, 2010, Kova?i? G.
Time series analyses are often used for the investigation of karst aquifers, but are only rarely employed in a way of using a large number of spatially distributed time series. Furthermore, only a small number of applications employ other types of hydrological data apart from rainfall, water level and discharge. The presented study of the Malen?ica karst spring aquifer underlines the usefulness of the simultaneous auto and cross-correlation analysis of daily and hourly hydrological data sets, including discharge, water level, temperature, electrical conductivity and rainfall on a regional scale. The results of the autocorrelation analysis show that the storage capacity of the spring is moderate, but this does not indicate that the system, which is characterized by prevailing conduit porosity, is less intensively karstifed. This suggests that well karstied systems of a more complex structure can have higher memory effects than less complex systems. The results of the cross-correlation analysis show that karst springs and watercourses in the investigated area react instantly and simultaneously to rather homogeneous precipitation, yet with different intensity. In such cases a cross-correlation analysis between rainfall or ponors as inputs and springs as outputs does not provide sufficient information on the hydrogeological functioning of the system, whereas the results of a cross-correlation analysis of electrical conductivity data sets provide valuable information on its functioning and can be easily compared to those obtained by tracer tests. On the other hand, the applicability of a temperature time series in such complex karst systems is limited. A comparative analysis of the results of the time series analyses performed in successive hydrological years has proven that the selection of the hydrological year can have strong effects on the results of a time series analysis.

Comparison of Conduit Volumes Obtained from Direct Measurements and Artificial Tracer Tests, 2010, Vojtechovska Anna, Bruthans Jiri, Krejca Frantisek

An isolated phreatic loop in a natural cave was used to test the reliability of artificial-tracer tests for estimating the volume of a flooded karst conduit. The volume of a phreatic tube was measured by filling a drained phreatic loop with a constant inflow over a known time period. The volume of the phreatic loop is 190 6 20 m3, and it was compared to independent calculations of conduit volumes based on values based on tracer breakthrough curves. The best results were for mean transit time, where tracer-test calculations yielded volumes very similar to the volume obtained by direct filling of the loop. On the other hand, using the first-arrival time or peak time in the volume calculation resulted in considerable underestimation of the phreatic tube’s volume, and these methods should be avoided except when breakthrough curves are affected by molecular diffusion. This demonstrates that volume estimation by tracer tests may be quite precise for common natural conduits, but results are strongly affected by the breakthrough-curve parameter chosen by the experimenter


Towards a better knowledge of Cansiglio karst system (Italy): results of the first successful groundwater tracer test, 2011, Vincenzi Valentina, Riva Alberto, Rossetti Stefano

Cansiglio is a limestone plateau located on the border between the regions of Veneto and Friuli-Venezia Giulia, northeastern Italy. The eastern area is characterized by a thick succession of Cretaceous peritidal carbonates, while the central western part is characterized by slope breccia deposits. Even though Pian Cansiglio is an important karst system, its hydrogeology is poorly known. Three important springs that form the Livenza River are located at its southeastern border and are thought to represent the majority of karst aquifer discharge, but no experimental data are available in the literature. Gruppo Speleologico Ferrarese explored an 800 m deep cave (Abisso Col de la Rizza) on Pian Cansiglio, which provided the opportunity to conduct tracer tests. Fluorescent dyes were injected in September 2008 in Abisso Col de la Rizza (uranine) and in Bus della Genziana (tinopal CBS-X). Over a period of three months, local cavers conducted an intense sampling programme, which included collecting water samples, charcoal bags and cotton lints. Automated samplers were used for high frequency monitoring at two of the springs. Tinopal was not detected, so the connection between Bus della Genziana and the springs was not demonstrated. The connection between Abisso Col de la Rizza and two of the springs was demonstrated by uranine. A mean velocity of 248 m/day results from the tracer concentration peaks; intense rainfall events increased the flow velocities four to five times. Different hypotheses are considered in order to explain the low mass recovery rate (32-40% of the injected mass). The uranine tracer test demonstrated that Pian Cansiglio aquifer contributes to the two Livenza springs; it also opens a question about the third spring, which probably originates from the Mount Cavallo area (another limestone massif close to Pian
Cansiglio). The rapid response to rainfall recharge suggests a
vulnerability of the spring system, further supporting the importance
of conducting a detailed hydrogeological study


The hydrogeology of Ogof Draenen: new insights into a complex multi-catchment karst system from tracer testing, 2011, Maurice Lou, Guilford Tim

 A current understanding of the hydrology of Ogof Draenen, Wales, one of the longest and most complex cave systems in Europe, is presented. Previous tracer tests are reviewed and results of two new tracer tests presented. Numerous dolines occur on the Marros Group (formerly ‘Millstone Grit’) sandstones and the Pembroke Limestone Group (both of Carboniferous age) that crop out around the edges of the mountains overlying Ogof Draenen, with hydrologically active sinking streams common along the boundary of these strata. Surface pollution of a doline caused diesel pollution in the cave beneath demonstrating the vulnerability of groundwater. There are a few recently formed hydrologically active passages but groundwater flow is also influenced by many kilometres of relict passages formed during multiple phases of speleogenesis. This results in vertical and horizontal underfit streams that cross or flow through large relict passages. In the southeast of the cave, tracer testing revealed an underground watershed demonstrating the complexity of groundwater flowpaths. In the north a cave stream flows to springs which drain north to the Clydach Gorge. Small amounts of drainage in the cave may also reach springs in the Tumble Valley to the northeast, although these springs may be unconnected to the cave and fed entirely by stream sinks on the Blorenge mountainside. Multi-tracer injections within the cave revealed that the major underground streams flow south to feed large springs at Snatchwood and Pontnewynydd in the Afon Lwyd valley, in a different topographical catchment some 8km beyond the known cave, with rapid groundwater velocities of up to 4km/day. Nine other springs in the Afon Lwyd valley appear unconnected to the Ogof Draenen streams, being fed independently by sinking streams on the local mountainside. In addition, we show that Specific Electrical Conductance varies greatly both between and within springs, is negatively related to background fluorescence


Interconnection of karst systems and flow piracy through karst collapse in layered carbonate rocks, 2011, Qian H. , Wang S. , Yan F. , Yuan D.

A new mode of interconnecting karst systems separated by impermeable bed due to karst collapse was discovered in the study of dam site in Guizhou, South China. Karst flow may be diverted from conduits in one layer to another, thus forming a connected karst system. Comprehensive methodology and techniques used in the investigation included surface geological surveys, geophysical investigations, special drilling, and tracer tests. In the stage of preliminary study, the karst conduits were considered to be developed separately along individual karstified layers. However, further investigation shows that karst collapse may be associated with conduit and cavern development, damaging the impermeable bed and its watertight function. Accordingly, a new pattern of karst conduit system was reestablished. The results obtained enable the dam designer to plan a reliable alternative for seepage protection. © 2009 Springer-Verlag.


PLANNING OF GROUNDWATER MONITORING IN THE IMPACT AREAS OF LANDFILLS IN KARST BASED ON THE RESULTS OF TRACER TESTS, 2011, Petrič, M. , Kogovsek J.


Water Tracing in Karst Aquifers, 2012, Jones, William K.

Water tracer tests are usually conducted to establish the hydrologic connections between two or more points. The tracer is an identifiable label or marker added to flowing water that establishes the links between the injection point of the tracer and the monitoring points where the tracer reappears. Fluorescent dyes are the most commonly used tracers in karst aquifers, but a wide range of substances has been used successfully. The experimental design of a tracer test may be qualitative to simply establish if a hydrologic connection exists between two points, or quantitative to measure the time-concentration series (breakthrough curve) generated by the recovery of the tracer. Water tracer tests usually work well in karst areas because of the fast groundwater flow rates and the prevalence of flow paths restricted to discrete conduits.


Solute transport in solution conduits exhibiting multi-peaked breakthrough curves, 2012, Field M. S. , Leij F. J.

Solute transport in karst aquifers is primarily constrained to solution conduits where transport is rapid, turbulent, and relatively unrestrictive. Breakthrough curves generated from tracer tests are typically positively-skewed and may exhibit multiple peaks. In order to understand the circumstances under which multi-peaked positively skewed breakthrough curves occur, physical experiments utilizing singleand multiple-flow channels were conducted. Experiments also included waterfalls, short-term solute detention in pools, and flow obstructions. Results demonstrated that breakthrough curve skewness nearly always occurs to some degree but is magnified as immobile-flow regions are encountered. Multi-peaked breakthrough curves occurred when flow in the main channel became partially occluded from blockage in the main channel that forced divergence of solute into auxiliary channels and when waterfalls and detention in pools occurred. Currently, multi-peaked breakthrough curves are fitted by a multi-dispersion model in which a series of curves generated by the advection–dispersion equation are fitted to each measured peak by superimposing the measured breakthrough curve to obtain a combined model fit with a consequent set of estimated velocities and dispersions. In this paper, a dual-advection dispersion equation with first-order mass transfer between conduits was derived. The dual-advection dispersion equation was then applied to the multi-peaked breakthrough curves obtained from the physical experiments in order to obtain some insight into the operative solute-transport processes through the acquisition of a consequent set of velocities, dispersions, and related parameters. Successful application of the dual-advection, dispersion equation to a tracer test that exhibited dual peaks for a karst aquifer known to consist of two connected but mostly separate conduits confirmed the appropriateness of using a multi-dispersion type model when conditions warrant.


Effective porosity of a carbonate aquifer with bacterial contamination: Walkerton, Ontario, Canada, 2012, Worthington S. R. H. , Smart C. C. , Ruland W.

Preferential flow through solutionally enlarged fractures can be a significant influence on travel times and source area definition in carbonate aquifers. However, it has proven challenging to step beyond a conceptual model to implementing, parameterizing and testing an appropriate numerical model of preferential flow. Here both porous medium and preferential flow models are developed with respect to a deadly contamination of the municipal groundwater supply at Walkerton, Ontario, Canada. The preferential flow model is based on simple orthogonal fracture aperture and spacing. The models are parameterized from bore hole, gamma, flow and video logs resulting in a two order of magnitude lower effective porosity for the preferential flow model. The observed hydraulic conductivity and effective porosity are used to predict groundwater travel times using a porous medium model. These model predictions are compared to a number of independent estimates of effective porosity, including three forced gradient tracer tests. The results show that the effective porosity and hydraulic conductivity values closely match the preferential flow predictions for an equivalent fracture network of _10 m spacing of 1 mm fractures. Three tracer tests resulted in groundwater velocities of hundreds of meters per day, as predicted when an effective porosity of 0.05% was used in the groundwater model. These velocities are consistent with a compilation of 185 tracer test velocities from regional Paleozoic carbonate aquifers. The implication is that carbonate aquifers in southern Ontario are characterized by relatively low-volume dissolutionally enlarged fracture networks that dominate flow and transport. The porous matrix has large storage capacity, but contributes little to transport. Numerical models based on much higher porosities risk significantly underestimating capture zones in such aquifers. The hydraulic conductivity – effective porosity prediction framework provides a general analytical frame work for a preferential flow carbonate aquifer. Not only is the framework readily parameterized from borehole observations, but also it can be implemented in a conventional porous medium model, and critically tested using simple tracer tests.


Groundwater flow and mixing in the complex karst aquifer system feed-ing the carbogaseous mineral springs of Stuttgart, Germany, 2013, Goldscheider Nico, Ufrecht Wolfgang

Groundwater flow and mixing in the complex karst aquifer system feed-ing the carbogaseous mineral springs of Stuttgart, Germany, 2013, Goldscheider Nico, Ufrecht Wolfgang

Characteristics of channel networks in unconfi ned carbonate aquifers, 2014,

Carbonate aquifers are some of most challenging to characterize because dissolution can greatly enhance permeability, but its effects are often difficult to determine. This study analyzes data from caves, wells, and tracer tests to explore the extent of solution channel networks and the factors that influence their development. The nonlinear dissolution kinetics of calcite, mixing of waters with different CO2 concentrations, and unstable dissolution fronts all promote the development of solution channels, which are widespread in unconfined carbonate aquifers. Fractures are important for guiding channels at a local scale, but hydraulic gradients are the dominant control at a regional scale. Channels provide continuous, large-aperture pathways that result in rapid groundwater flow. Small channels are much more abundant than large channels, and often account for most of the permeability measured in wells. Caves represent the largest channels; they are more common in limestone than in dolostone, and the development of caves rather than smaller channels is also favored where there is sparse fracturing, low matrix porosity, and the presence of sinking stream recharge rather than percolation recharge. Solution channel networks have fractal properties, and their presence explains why carbonate aquifers have higher permeability than aquifers in any other rock type.


Characteristics of channel networks in unconfined carbonate aquifers, 2014, Worthington, Stephen R. H.

Carbonate aquifers are some of most challenging to characterize because dissolution can greatly enhance permeability, but itseffects are often diffi cult to determine. This study analyzes data from caves, wells, and tracer tests to explore the extent of solution channel networks and the factors that infl uence their development. The nonlinear dissolution kinetics of calcite, mixing of waters with different CO2 concentrations, and unstable dissolution fronts all promote the development of solution channels, which are widespread in unconfi ned carbonate aquifers. Fractures are important for guiding channels at a local scale, but hydraulic gradients are the dominant control at a regional scale. Channels provide continuous, large-aperture pathways that result in rapid groundwater fl ow. Small channels are much more abundant than large channels, and often account for most of the permeability measured in wells. Caves represent the largest channels; they are more common in limestone than in dolostone, and the development of caves rather than smaller channels is also favored where there is sparse fracturing, low matrix porosity, and the presence of sinking stream recharge rather than percolation recharge. Solution channel networks have fractal properties, and their presence explains why carbonate aquifers have higher permeability than aquifers in any other rock type


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