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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone! I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc Also we have forum there. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That soda straw is 1. proto-stalactite in which water flow down through the center of the straw. upon entering a vadose cave passage, the change in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide cause co2 degassing and the slow precipitation of caco3. the straw grows downwards as a result; water also flows down the outside of the straw causing the stalactite to grow outwards around the straw. 2. american name for straw stalactite [9].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Did you know?

That hardness is 1. property of water that prevents lathering because of the presence of cations, mainly calcium and magnesium, which form insoluble soaps [10]. 2. the sum of calcium and magnesium ions expressed as the equivalent amount of calcium carbonate (caco3) [16]. 3. the property to form insoluble salts of fatty acid (soap) [16].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Interpretation of hydrogeological functioning of a high karst plateau using the KARSYS approach: the case of Trnovsko-Banjška planota (Slovenia), Turk Janez, Malard Arnauld, Jeannin Pierre-Yves, Vouillamoz Jonathan, Masini Jean, Petrič Metka, Gabrovšek Franci, Ravbar Nataša, Slabe Tadej
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RADON, CARBON DIOXIDE AND FAULT DISPLACEMENTS IN CENTRAL EUROPE RELATED TO THE TO HOKU EARTHQUAKE, Briestensky´, M.; Thinova, L.; Praksova, R.; Stemberk, J.; Rowberry, M. D.; Knejflova´, Z.
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Karst research & activity news

Sinkhole session (NH 8.6) at EGU 2012

Author Alexander Klimchouk. Posted on 20 Dec, 2011

Dear colleagues,

we would like to draw your attention on the following forthcoming
Scientific Session on Sinkholes at the General Assembly of EGU in
Vienna, next April:

Session NH8.6 "Sinkholes: from susceptibility to risk evaluation and
mapping"
at EGU General Assembly (Vienna, 22-27 April 2012)

Convened by: Mario Parise, Giulio Iovine, Stefania Nisio

Session Description
Sinkholes are widespread in many countries of the world, in several geological and morphological settings, affecting distinct lithotypes either in the detrital cover sequences or in bedrock outcrops. In particular, some phenomena develop in geomorphological context characterized by plain areas and notable detrital coverages, either made of sediments or colluvial or residual terrains, thick even tens to hundreds of meters. In some cases, the genetic mechanisms are poorly understood; they can be quite complex and appear not directly connected with classical karstic processes. The recent urban development and the increasing need of spaces for infrastructures in areas potentially affected by sinkholes require a better comprehension in terms of related susceptibility, hazard and risk. The session aims to stimulate the discussion on the state-of-the-art of the studies on the mentioned topic, with special regard to sinkholes in plain not-karstic areas. Analyses of genetic mechanisms, methodological examples of investigation, and case studies are welcome, as well as description of techniques for evaluating susceptibility, hazard and risk.

Note: A selection of studies presented at this session will be considered for publication in a special issue of a relevant international journal.

For info on how to submit an Abstract see this page.

or go directly at the sessions page, choose Session NH8.6, and press "Abstract submission"

The deadline for the submission of Abstracts is 17 January 2012.

Further information about the EGU General Assembly 2012 can be found 
here , and information about EGU itself can be found here .

In case any technical questions arise, please contact us

For any questions relevant to the Session organization please do not
hesitate to contact me

We hope to see you in Vienna!

Best Regards,

Mario Parise and co-conveners

Latest news from Speleogenesis community:

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Hello everyone! I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko") There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc Also we have forum there Site's language is Russian Welcome! --Aleksandr Shakalov. ...

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New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi, Sandro International Journal of Speleology, 2012, Vol 41, Issue 2, p 35-55 Speleogenetic effects of interaction between deeply derived fracture-conduit and intrastratal matrix flow in hypogene karst settings Klimchouk, AB, Tymokhina, EI, Amelichev, GN International Journal of Speleology, 2012, Vol 41, Issue 2, p 37-55 Hypogenic contribution to speleogenesis in a predominant epigenic karst system: A case study from the Venetian Alps, Italy Tisato Nicola, Sauro Francesco, Bernasconi Stefano M , Bruijn Rolf H C , De Waele Jo Geomorphology, 2012, Vol 151, p 156-163 L’altération de type "fantôme de roche" : processus, évolution et implications pour la karstification Quinif Yves, Bruxelles Laurent Géomorphologie : relief, processus, environnement, 2011, Vol 4 You can download these publications following the links to PDF files on respective original websites As a part of collaboration within the HypoKarst, we suggest that the project members inform each other about their own and other published works relevant to the topic An easy way to do this, and generally promote the readership for your papers, is to submit publications to the KarstBase through the online submission form (One needs to be registered to access the form) By including words “hypogene” or “hypogenic” in the keywords (if they are not present within the title), you’ll make the publication appearing in the respective search selection that represens current bibliography on hypogene karst/speleogenesis Check this link regularly if you want to stay updated on current publications in the field Best wishes! Sincerely, --Alexander Klimchouk and Yuri Dublyansky, HypoKarst Project coordinators. ...

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The deepest terrestrial animal

A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto Reviews of the genera Schaefferia Absolon, 1900, Deuteraphorura Absolon, 1901, Plutomurus Yosii, 1956 and the Anurida Laboulbène, 1865 species group without eyes, with the description of four new species of cave springtails (Collembola) from Krubera-Voronya cave, Arabika Massif, Abkhazia Terrestrial Arthropod Reviews 5 (2012) 35–85 DOI: follow this link (information supplied by Sofia Reboleira). ...

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Caves - landscapes without light

Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals Several interactive installations are available as well as audiovisual room presenting current state of the art in current research findings 28 spectacular Austrian caves are presented Important goal of the exhibition is to demonstrate how Vienna is supplied by drinking water from karst areas. ...

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Speleogenesis news:

Karst session at the 2014 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting

Greetings Fellow Karstologues, Do you have recent research on karst or fissured aquifers, ripe for the presenting? Bring it to session 2884 at the AGU fall meeting this December in San Francisco! The 2014 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting (http://fallmeetingaguorg/2014/), will be held December 15-19, 2014 The abstract submission site is now open -- the deadline to submit an abstract is August 6 The fall AGU meeting is the largest worldwide conference in geophysical sciences This exciting international meeting is held in one of the world's most vibrant and beautiful cities Don't miss out! Session ID: 2884 Session Title: Multiscale hydrological, geochemical, biological response of fissured/karst aquifers Best regards, Barbara Mahler, PhD, PG Research Hydrologist USGS Texas Water Science Center See Speleogenesis Calendar for details of the karst session. ...

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Karst hydrology position

The New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMT) invites applications for two tenure-track assistant professor level positions in Hydrology and one in Geochemistry For the hydrology positions, we seek candidates with interests in flow and transport in porous media, hyporheic zone studies, karst hydrology, hydrogeomechanics, isotope hydrology, or aqueous geochemistry For exceptionally well-qualified hydrology candidates an appointment at the Associate Professor level will be considered For the geochemistry position, we seek candidates with interests in igneous petrochemistry (especially volcanic rocks), metamorphic petrology, sedimentary geochemistry, geochemistry of ore deposits, and radiogenic isotope geochemistry Potential for excellence in teaching and research are the most important qualifications Applicants should submit a letter of interest, resume, a statement of teaching and research interests, one representative publication, and the names of three references to Hydrology Search, Human Resources, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, 801 Leroy Pl, Socorro, New Mexico 87801 College transcripts will be required if selected to interview Review of application material will begin on October 1, 2014 The search will remain open until the position is filled Email applications are not accepted New Mexico Tech is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer Applicants should have a PhD in Earth Science, Civil or Environmental Engineering, or a related field at the time of appointment Women and underrepresented minorities are encouraged to apply For inquiries, contact Hydrology search committee chair, Mark Person (mperson@nmtedu), or the Geochemistry search committee chair, Fred Phillips (phillips@nmtedu) NOTES: 3 openings Read more about these positions on the AGU Career Center, search “Assistant Professors of Hydrology and Geochemistry” http://careersaguorg/jobs/6294148/assistant-associate-professorship-positions-in-hydrology-and-geochemistry ******************** George Veni, PhD Executive Director National Cave and Karst Research Institute. ...

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International Conference on Groundwater in Karst - website launched

The web site for the 2015 KG@B meeting is now up and running John Gunn, Professor, Limestone Research Group School of Geography, Earth & Environmental Sciences University of Birmingham. ...

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Free access to the "Cave & Karst Science" journal

Volumes of the journal "Cave & Karst Science" (Transactions of the British Cave Research Association) from 1974 to 2005 are now available as free downloads at http://bcraorguk/pub/candks/cataloguehtml To view more recent volumes go to http://bcraorguk/pub/candks/indexhtml There is normally an annual fee to access this content but BCRA Council have agreed to provide free access for 1 month to encourage scientists to read past papers and, hopefully, to take out a subscription to support future publications So, if you would like to read David Lowe's latest paper on Inception Horizons ("Geological influences on cave origin and development in the Yorkshire Dales, UK"; issue 41(1), 2014) or Trevor Faulkners detailed discussion of flow hydraulics in karst conduits ("Speleogenesis and scallop formation and demise under hydraulic control and other recharge regimes"; issue 40(3), 2013) go to the web site, click on the padlock and you will be taken to a site where you can either subscribe to the journal or obtain a free 1 month subscription that will allow you to download the papers Best wishes, John Professor John Gunn Limestone Research Group School of Geography, Earth & Environmental Sciences University of Birmingham. ...

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Important discussion on the Ford’s Four-State Model

I’d like to draw attention to a recently published blog post of Derek Ford that provides, from the today’s perspective, a thorough review of arguments pro and contra for the Four-State model of cave genesis in the dimensions of length and depth It contains a critique of ""Looping caves” versus “water table caves": The role of base-level changes and recharge variations in cave development" (Gabrovsek, Häuselmann and Audra, 2014) and opens an informal discussion on many relevant aspects On behalf of the UIS Commission on Karst Hydrogeology and Speleogenesis, I kindly invite interested researchers to participate in this discussion in the Speleogenesis Blog Registered members of the Speleogenesis Network may post their comments/replies to the Derek’s blog post, or start their own blogs offering opinions, discussions and information on any aspects of karst and cave science Alexander Klimchouk. ...

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Geological Society of America Convention 2014 karst sessions: call for abstracts

It is that time of year again to announce the call for papers for the Geological Society of America Convention This year it will be held in beautiful Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, on 19-22 October Five karst or karst-related sessions are offered this year The first two below are sponsored by NCKRI and the three that follow have related themes involving speleothems as records of paleoenvironmental and paleoecological changes One karst field trip will be offered and its description is also below Registration for GSA opens tomorrow, 2 June, and general information on the conference can be found at this website The abstract deadline is 29 July Information on how to submit abstracts and the full list of sessions is available here Information on the field trips is at this page under the Science & Careers tab (the karst trip is in the Pre-Meeting menu option) T82 Enhancing the Toolkit for Karst Investigations Douglas Gouzie, Matthew D Covington, Joseph Myre GSA Hydrogeology Division; GSA Geophysics Division; Karst Waters Institute; National Cave and Karst Research Institute We will cover applications of novel, emerging, cost-effective tools used in karst investigations, emphasizing recent advances in instrumentation and remote sensing, isotopic and geophysical methods, computational models of karst processes and systems, or similar methods T83 Karst Systems and Processes in Mountainous and Alpine Terrain Lewis A Land, Tim R Stokes, Chas Yonge National Cave and Karst Research Institute; GSA Hydrogeology Division; GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division Karst in alpine and mountainous settings is an under-investigated field of research We seek presentations on karst-related topics, including geomorphology, hydrology, paleoclimatology, glaciation, and resource development, in alpine settings within the Pacific Northwest and internationally T119 Organic Carbon Proxies in Terrestrial Paleoecology James M Fulton, William C Hockaday, Todd L Longbottom, Lauren A Michel Geochemical Society; Society for Sedimentary Geology (SEPM); GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Limnogeology Division; GSA Coal Geology Division; Soils and Soil Processes Interdisciplinary Interest Group This session seeks to include work covering molecular and isotopic information in organic molecules Proxy development and/or applications to terrestrial records (in soils, sediments, tree rings, and speleothems) are of interest T192 High-Resolution Geochemical Proxies of Global Change: Progress, Problems, and Utility (Posters) David P Gillikin, David H Goodwin, Alan D Wanamaker Jr Paleontological Society; Paleoceanography/Paleoclimatology; Geochemical Society We seek papers presenting geochemical records of global change, including calibration/validation studies, in biologic or inorganic carbonates (eg, mollusks, corals, speleothems) and highly resolved sediments Geochemical studies highlighting recent progress, problems, or utility are welcome T193 Speleothem Records of Climate Change in North America Jessica L Oster, Isabel P Montañez Geochemical Society This session focuses on speleothem records of North American climate We encourage presentation of records utilizing multi-proxy approaches to investigate multiple facets of paleoenvironmental change and those aimed at refining analytical tools applicable to speleothems 402 Karst Lands of Central Vancouver Island Wed–Sat, 15–18 Oct This trip begins and ends in Nanaimo, British Columbia Cost: US$621 3B, 4L, 1D, 3ON Leader: Tim R Stokes, Vancouver Island Univ Cosponsors: GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA Environmental and Engineering Geology Division Trip Description A four day field trip is proposed to examine the spectacular karst lands of Central Vancouver Island Little is known about the origin and evolution of these karst landscapes, therefore the focus of the field trip is to explore some of the likely geological, geomorphic and hydrologic constraints that have led to the formation of these regions during the last 100,000 years Vancouver Island hosts this significant temperate rainforest karst, similar to that found in SE Alaska, Tasmania and New Zealand The evolution of these dynamic karst landscapes has been influenced by such factors as the limestone geology, the present and past climates, past glacial events, tectonic uplift and sea level changes Visits will be made to a range of karst landscapes from: alpine/sub-alpine to forested mid-slopes and valley bottoms, as well as some of the coastal (littoral) karst settings The field trip will be based in Campbell River on the east side of Vancouver Island and day trips will be carried out from here Possible sites that will be visited include—Upana Caves, White Ridge Provincial Park, Quadra Island and Horne Lake Caves Provincial Park—a center of cave/karst tourism on the Island Side trips will also be included giving an insight into the first nation history and culture of Vancouver Island, as well as the resource activities such as mining and forestry ******************** George Veni, PhD Executive Director National Cave and Karst Research Institute. ...

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New NCKRI publications

The National Cave and Karst Research Institute (NCKRI) has been busy with many different things, including a variety of publication and research projects We have posted several new publications on our website; nearly all can be downloaded for free There is one publication I’m especially excited to introduce with this message Under the “Symposia and Special Papers” menu bar you’ll find: NCKRI Special Paper 2: Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Formation of Cave and Karst Phenomena in the Guadalupe Mountains and Western Delaware Basin, New Mexico and Texas, by Douglas Kirkland The Guadalupe Mountains serve internationally as the classic study area for hypogenic cave development However, questions and some controversy still remain on the processes Douglas Kirkland has worked for decades in the area In this volume he has pulled together and analyzed a tremendous amount of information to answer some of the more important questions and offer new insights to the region’s cave and karst development His work will likely serve as a model for research in other areas as well Also under the “Symposia and Special Papers” menu bar you’ll find from two conferences NCKRI hosted last year: NCKRI Symposium 2: Proceedings of the Thirteenth Multidisciplinary Conference on Sinkholes and the Engineering and Environmental Impacts of Karst, edited by Dr Lewis Land, Dr Daniel H Doctor, and J Brad Stephenson and NCKRI Symposium 3: Proceedings of the 20th National Cave and Karst Management Symposium, edited by Dr Lewis Land and Mark W Joop If you look under the “Investigation Reports” menu bar, you’ll find five reports posted so far on: · Karst flooding in Guatemala · Electrical resistivity study of a brine well cavity in salt · Electrical resistivity study of cavities in gypsite · Evaluation of National Park Service cave and karst needs · Electrical resistivity study of a proposed well drill site The Guatemala report is part of humanitarian project The resistivity projects are first steps toward developing a broad collection of geophysical surveys in a variety of geological settings in order to better evaluate the data and techniques The National Park Service report is a nationwide study that identifies all US national parks with known or potential caves, karst, and pseudokarst resources, and their status and needs relative to research, management, and public education and interpretation of the resources This study will assist the Park Service in identifying and prioritizing their cave/karst research needs Under the Annual Reports tab you’ll find our latest summary of activities plus the reports for all of our previous years More reports are in the works and will be posted as completed George ******************** George Veni, PhD Executive Director National Cave and Karst Research Institute. ...

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Position of PhD researcher in Karst (Montpellier, France)

3D Modelling (geometry and connections) of carbonate massifs in structurally complex areas : An application to buried karst reservoirs of Languedoc (South France) More details here Karstic reservoirs offer new opportunities to secure water resources in the populated and arid regions, such as the Mediterranean Karstified Jurassic carbonate massifs presently buried beneath Cenozoic cover have been studied in the south of France by BRGM, and more recently by Husson (2013) Objective The objective is to develop a method to determine the 1) distribution, 2) connectivity and 3) intensity of karstification of the carbonate massifs, including buried karsts The study area (Languedoc) incorporates the previous (Husson, 2013) study and extends south-westward, ie downstream of the watershed This study area is well suited for developing and validating the method (good data coverage & known geodynamic evolution), which can then be exported, especially in Mediterranean region Operations 1- Construction of a 3D geological model of this poly-deformed area; the model will include all geological information concerned with the (paleo)karsts and (paleo) base-level indicators Surface geology, 2D seismic reflexion, exploration borehole data, gravimetry will be compiled and integrated, within the BRGM-Intrepid “Geomodeller” While building the geomodel, tests of consistency of 2D restoration of random lines (using Schlumberger-Igeoss “Dynel2D”) will provide a validation of the geomodel Additionnal validation will be secured by gravity inversion of the geomodel and comparison with available measured gravity data 2- Sequential 3D restoration of the geomodel, at successive times of documented karstification (Messinian, Late Miocene, Early Paleocene, Mid-Cretaceous), using Schlumberger-Igeoss “Dynel3D” Restoration will provide for each period : the flow-lines within the massifs from upstream topography towards the outlet, whether it is surficial (over impervious formations) or karstic (through carbonate massif) drainage Karstified and non-karstified (above and below base-level, respectively) carbonate massifs will be delineated within the restored geomodels, for each karstification periods 3- These paleo-base levels, obtained at the different stages of karstification will be input in the present day geomodel, in order to determine the distribution of karstified portions of the carbonate massifs (located above paleo base-level) The output will be the volume of potentially karstified massifs and the distribution of superimposed karsts, the later being an indication of increased karstification 4- Gravity inversion of the 3D geomodel (with BRGM-Intrepid “Geomodeller”) provides density distribution We suggests that lower density values within the carbonate formations, correlate with karstified areas The gravity inversion results will be analysed (qualitatively & quantitatively) and correlated with the distribution of karstified massifs derived from the previous stage 5- The findings will be analysed and tested in the light of regional hydrogeological data Applications: - Exploration of karst reservoirs (water, oil & gas, mining industry) - Management of karst reservoirs (water supply, hydrothermal resorts, gas storage, geothermy). ...

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The USGS Karst Interest Group 2014 conference

The US Geological Survey’s (USGS) Karst Interest Group (KIG) will hold its next conference on 28 April through 2 May 2014 in Carlsbad, New Mexico, at the headquarters of the National Cave and Karst Research Institute (NCKRI) This is the sixth in a series of conferences that are held every three years in different locations around the USA Two days of papers and exchanges of ideas/information are planned, followed by two days of field trips While these conferences began primarily for USGS employees, they have expanded, first to other federal agencies, then non-federal agencies plus universities, and now they are being advertised to anyone with a strong interest in karst hydrogeology Historically, the costs of these conferences have been largely sponsored and this year is no different with only minor registration fees I encourage you to register but also to reserve your hotel rooms as soon as possible The oil and gas boom is filling nearly every room in town every night, so make your reservations early For those of you who look closely at the schedule, you’ll see the conference is advertised as starting on 28 April but the program starts on the 29th The 28th will be a travel day for most people attending and we’ll have an informal evening social that will be added to the program later Еhe website for the KIG meeting: http://kig2014businesscatalystcom/indexhtml If you have questions, please let us know Also please forward this message to anyone who may be interested See you soon in Carlsbad! Eve Kuniansky and George Veni KIG 2014 co-chairs. ...

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International Conference on Groundwater in Karst

International Conference on Groundwater in Karst With optional pre-and post-conference field trips 20-26 June 2015, Birmingham, UK PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT The word "karst" is a germanization of the place name for a region in the northwest Dinaric area that is commonly referred to as "the Classic Karst" The word has passed into the scientific vocabulary to describe a special environment in which the major groundwater flux is through an integrated network of disolutionally enlarged channels that discharge via discrete springs The channels span a very wide aperture range; the smallest are little more than micro-fractures or pathways through the rock matrix but at the other end of the spectrum (and commonly in the same rock mass) channels may grow to dimensions where they can be explored by humans and are called caves The relationships between matrix, channels and conduits in a carbonate rock mass are a product of recharge and rock lithology, stratigraphy and structure and exploration of these relationships is a key theme of the conference Water transfer through the smaller channels that are commonly intersected by boreholes is very slow and has often been analysed using equivalent porous media models although the limitations of such models are increasingly recognised At the other end of the spectrum (and commonly in the same rock mass) the channels may grow to dimensions where they can be explored by humans (caves) through which water flow is analagous to ‘a surface stream with a roof’ and may be amenable to analysis by models devised for urban pipe networks The development of holistic and realistic models for water movement and storage in karst is a second key theme of the conference The direct, and often rapid connections between surface water and groundwater in karst have given rise to distinctive groundwater ecosystems that have only recently been subject to detailed study and this forms a third theme for the conference Finally, of course, it is well known that karst groundwater systems are of global importance to humans both as direct sources of potable water and as the source of many rivers Hence, a fourth theme will consider human-karst groundwater interactions, a wide area that includes water resource assessment, groundwater protection, mineral extraction and infrastructure development In summary, the CONFERENCE THEMES will be: 1 Lithological, structural & stratigraphical influences on karst groundwaters 2 Modelling karst groundwater systems 3 The ecology of karst groundwaters 4 Human-karst groundwater interactions The symposium will be the annual meeting of the IAH Karst Commission and of the UIS Commission of Karst Hydrogeology and Speleogenesis and is also sponsored by the British Cave Research Association, the British Geological Survey, the Hydrogeology Group of the Geological Society of London and the IAH GB Chapter The symposium will take place shortly after the 80th birthday of Professor Derek Ford and will provide an opportunity to celebrate with him and to recognise the huge contribution that he has made to the study of karst DATES AND PRELIMINARY PROGRAMME The Conference will take place at the University of Birmingham from 20-26 June 2015 as follows: Saturday 20th June : Optional special workshop for consultants and professionals on "Karst groundwater systems" Sunday 21st June : Optional field trip - Groundwater in Cretaceous carbonates Monday 22nd June : Opening of formal meeting Paper sessions Evening meeting of karst commissions Tuesday 23rd June : Morning paper sessions Afternoon Optional field trip to local underground limestone quarry visited by canal barge, or workshops or free time to visit local area Evening Conference dinner Wednesday 24th June : Paper sessions Close of formal meeting Thursday 25th June : Optional field trip - Groundwater in Jurassic carbonates Friday 26th June : Optional field trip - Groundwater in Carboniferous carbonates. ...

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