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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That ground-water artery is a tubular body of permeable water-filled material surrounded by confining beds [16].?

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3N Cave, New World’s Longest Cave in Salt

M. Filippi(1), Z. Vilhelm(2), J. Bruthans(2), M. Zare(3) and N. Asadi(3)

(1) Institute of Geology, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, Rozvojová 269, 165 02 Prague 6, Czech Republic, e-mail: filippi@gli.cas.cz
(2) Department of Hydrogeology, Engineering Geology and Applied Geophysics, Charles University, Albertov 6, 128 43 Prague 2, Czech Republic, e-mail: bruthans@natur.cuni.cz
(3) Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran

Key words: salt karst, 3N Cave, longest salt cave, Iran

Abstract: During the last January 2006 expedition the Big Ponor Cave was connected with the Cave of Tří Naháčů (former second longest cave in salt). The resulting cave was named 3N Cave and altogether with newly mapped parts reaches the total length of 6,580 m. It is some 900 m longer than Malham Cave (5,685 m, Mt. Sedom, Israel) now being the second.

3N Cave Photo Gallery

Photos by M. Audy, R. Bouda, M. Filippi and T. Svoboda

By like of brine flooded lower entrance of the 3N Cave. Photo by M. Filippi Shaft to the 3N Cave, ca 40 m deep. Photo by M. Audy
By like of brine flooded lower entrance of the 3N Cave. Photo by M. Filippi Shaft to the 3N Cave, ca 40 m deep. Photo by M. Audy
Dome behind the lake in the 3N Cave. Photo by M. Audy and R. Bouda Place called as the Octopus, 3N Cave. Photo by M. Audy and R. Bouda
Dome behind the lake in the 3N Cave. Photo by M. Audy and R. Bouda Place called as the Octopus, 3N Cave. Photo by M. Audy and R. Bouda
Place called as the Octopus in the 3N Cave. Photo by M. Audy and R. Bouda Dome behind the Shaft – start of the narrow spaces named as the Bend, 3N Cave. Photo by M. Filippi and T. Svoboda.
Place called as the Octopus in the 3N Cave. Photo by M. Audy and R. Bouda Dome behind the Shaft – start of the narrow spaces named as the Bend, 3N Cave. Photo by M. Filippi and T. Svoboda.
Wide spaces of the Namakdan Highway, 3N Cave. Photo by M. Audy and R. Bouda Stalactite in old parts of the Megadomes, 3N Cave. Photo by M. Audy
Wide spaces of the Namakdan Highway, 3N Cave. Photo by M. Audy and R. Bouda Stalactite in old parts of the Megadomes, 3N Cave. Photo by M. Audy
Folded salt on the roof in the Megadomes, 3N Cave. Photo by M. Audy and R. Bouda Partly collapsed parts of the Megadomes, 3N Cave. Photo by M. Audy and R. Bouda
Folded salt on the roof in the Megadomes, 3N Cave. Photo by M. Audy and R. Bouda Partly collapsed parts of the Megadomes, 3N Cave. Photo by M. Audy and R. Bouda
The Big Ponor entrance – the main ponor to the 3N Cave. Photo by M. Audy and R. Bouda Inside the Big Ponor entrance, 3N Cave. Photo by M. Filippi
The Big Ponor entrance – the main ponor to the 3N Cave. Photo by M. Audy and R. Bouda Inside the Big Ponor entrance, 3N Cave. Photo by M. Filippi`
Meandering river leaving the Namakdan salt diapir from the lower entrance of the 3N Cave. Photo by T. Svoboda Doline in caprock (residual sediment covering the salt), often with shafts on the bottom, surface above the 3N Cave. Photo by T. Svoboda 
Meandering river leaving the Namakdan salt diapir from the lower entrance of the 3N Cave. Photo by T. Svoboda Doline in caprock (residual sediment covering the salt), often with shafts on the bottom, surface above the 3N Cave. Photo by T. Svoboda 
Detail of the skeletal halite stalagmite. Photo by M. Filippi Rhinopoma hardwickii – the most common inhabitant of the 3N Cave. Photo by M. Filippi
Detail of the skeletal halite stalagmite. Photo by M. Filippi Rhinopoma hardwickii – the most common inhabitant of the 3N Cave. Photo by M. Filippi