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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That tubular passage; tube; tube passage is 1. cave passage formed by approximately equal dissolution all round when full of flowing water within the phreas. relict tubes, abandoned as the water table was lowered, are common in old caves, and may be partially filled by sediment, breakdown or stalagmite, or entrenched to form keyhole passages. tube sizes range to over 15m in diameter, but the larger ones are rarely of uniform section. peak cavern in derbyshire is well known for its fine circular phreatic tubes. some of the trunk passages of mammoth cave, kentucky, are spectacular tubes of elliptical section, formed by dissolution rates that were higher along the bedding than across [9]. 2. these are nearly horizontal cave passages (tunnels) with round or elliptical cross sections and are either straight or winding. at mammoth cave they vary in size up to 30 feet high and nearly 100 feet wide. they are formed while completely filled with flowing water. whereas they are typically wider than high as a result of dissolution along horizontal cracks and beddingplane partings, they may also form as high, narrow, straight fissures along major vertical or near vertical fractures [15]. see also canyon passage; keyhole passage; passage; vertical shaft.?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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SAZU, Ljubljana
Acta carsologica, 2001, Vol 30, Issue 2, p. 13-32
Dynamics of Cave development by Allogenic water
Abstract:

Streams that drain from non karstic surfaces tend to have great discharge fluctuations and low concentrations of dissolved solids. Where these streams encounter karstic rocks they can form caves with hydraulic and chemical dynamics quite different from those fed by autogenic recharge (e.g. through dolines). Caves in carbonate rocks that are fed by allogenic streams have a relatively short inception period, after which the mean annual rate of dissolutional wall retreat is typically about 0.01 cm/yr. Most of the annual growth takes place during a few major floods that occupy only a small fraction of the year. Local growth rates can be enhanced by abrasion from sediment. During floods, highly aggressive water is delivered rapidly to points deep within the karst aquifer. As flood discharge increases, cave streams become ponded by constrictions caused by detrital sediment, insoluble beds, or collapse material. Because the discharge during a flood rises by several orders of magnitude, the head loss across constrictions can increase enormously, causing water to fill parts of the cave under considerable pressure. This highly aggressive water is injected into all available openings in the surrounding bedrock, enlarging them at a rapid and nearly uniform rate. Depending on the structural nature of the bedrock, a dense array of blind fissures, pockets, anastomoses, or spongework is formed. Many such caves develop traversable mazes that serve either as bypass routes around constrictions, or as "karst annexes", which store and later release floodwaters. Many features that are sometimes attributed to slow phreatic flow or mixing corrosion are actually generated by ponded floodwaters. In caves that experience severe flooding, adjacent fissures or bypass routes with initial widths at least 0.01 cm can grow to traversable size within 10,000 years.