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Enviroscan Ukrainian Institute of Speleology and Karstology

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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That crustaceans is the large class of animals that includes lobsters, crayfish, amphipods, isopods, and many similar forms. crustaceans typically live in water and have many jointed appendages, segmented bodies, and hard exoskeletons [23].?

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Original article

Die Hoehle, 2006, Vol 57, Issue -3, p. 76-89
Aktuelle Forschungen in der Südwandhöhle (Dachsteinloch, 1543/28), Stmk/OÖ
Abstract:
The Dachstein range (located roughly 50 km southeast of the city of Salzburg) is one of the largest and most impressive limestone massifs in the Alps. Its highest peaks reach almost 3000m in altitude and there are several huge cave systems in the northern part. Among them are the Hirlatzhöhle (length 95 km, depth ±1070 m) and the Mammuthöhle (62 km, ±1207 m). The Südwandhöhle is located at the foot of the southern flank of the Dachstein massive and is known since 1886. First speleological explorations were done by Hermann Bock in 1910. At that time, the passage all the way to the Dome (400m) was surveyed. Bock assumed already an opening to further passages in the roof of the dome. However, the breakthrough to new passages was made as late as 1980, when members of the Austrian Alpine Club of Schladming (ÖAV Schladming) managed to climb up two walls and discovered new galleries. In the following two decades several kilometres of big passages were discovered. Unfortunately there was very little or no documentation of these parts of the cave carried out. Students of the University of Dresden have conducted an 800m long theodolite survey and a number of passage profiles in the framework of a diploma thesis. In 2001, cave explorers of the Verein für Höhlenkunde in Obersteier (VHO), Bad Mitterndorf, started to explore and survey the cave systematically. The exploration is done in cooperation with the Museum of Natural History (NHM) in Vienna and aims for comprehensive scientific documentation.