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Enviroscan Ukrainian Institute of Speleology and Karstology

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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That aven is 1. a hole in the roof of a cave passage that may be either a rather large blind roof pocket or a tributary inlet shaft into the cave system. a feature described as an aven when seen from below may equally be described as shaft when seen from above, and the naming of such a feature commonly depends purely upon the direction of exploration. many avens close upwards to impenetrable fissures but may still be important hydrological routes; few caves are without them. in parts of france, aven is equivalent to the british term, pothole [9]. 2. (french.) a vertical or highly inclined shaft in limestone, extending upward from a cave passage, generally to the surface; smaller than an abime. commonly related to enlarged vertical joints. compare cenote; natural well; pothole. 3. (british.) a vertical extension from a shaft in a passage or chamber roof that tapers upward rather like a very elongate cone [10]. compare dome pit.?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
See all featured articles from other geoscience journals

NSS
Journal of Cave and Karst Studies, 2009, Vol 71, Issue 3, p. 204-209
The Virginia Cave Protection Act: a review (1966–2009)
Abstract:
The Virginia Cave Protection Act was first ratified in 1966, with a major revision in 1979, yet Virginia cave and karst resources are still threatened by vandalism, pollution, and poorly planned development. As public interest in outdoor recreation continues to grow and land development accelerates in the Appalachian Valley and Ridge Province west of the Blue Ridge Mountains, increased pressure will be put on Virginia’s limited and fragile cave resources. Over the past thirty years, there have been many important court cases in Virginia, as well as countless state and federal actions. The difficulty of apprehension and prosecution of vandals demonstrates the inadequacy of current penalties. More prosecutions and harsher penalties will invariably serve as a deterrent to future potential vandals. Complex state projects, like highway widening and the construction of new prisons and airports, put additional pressure on karst areas. In order to preserve the unique educational, recreational, scientific, historic, and economic values of Virginia caves and karst, the Virginia Cave Board has been authorized to safeguard these resources.