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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That ice is crystallized water formed below the freezing point (h2o) [16].?

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 2004, Vol 235, Issue 1, p. 255-300
Dolomites in SE Asia -- varied origins and implications for hydrocarbon exploration
Abstract:
Carbonates in SE Asia range in age from Palaeozoic to Recent, but are most important as reservoirs in the Neogene where they comprise a major target for hydrocarbon exploration (e.g. Batu Raja Formation, South Sumatra, Sunda and Northwest Java basins). Carbonates of pre-Tertiary, Palaeogene and Neogene age all show a strong diagenetic overprint in which dolomite occurs as both cementing and replacive phases associated with variable reservoir quality. This paper reviews published data on the occurrence and types of dolomites in SE Asian carbonates, and considers the models that have been used to explain the distribution and origin of dolomite within these rocks. Pre-Tertiary carbonates form part of the economic basement, and are little studied and poorly understood. Although some, such as in the Manusela Formation of Seram, may form possible hydrocarbon reservoirs, most are not considered to form economic prospects. They are best known from the platform carbonates of the Ratburi and Saraburi groups. in Thailand, and the oolitic grainstones of the Manusela Formation of Seram. The Ratburi Group shows extensive dolomitization with dolomite developed as an early replacive phase and as a late-stage cement. Palaeogene carbonates are widely developed in the region and are most commonly developed as extensive foraminifera-dominated carbonate shelfal systems around the margins of Sundaland (e.g. Tampur Formation, North Sumatra Basin and Tonasa Formation, Sulawesi) and the northern margins of Australia and the Birds Head microcontinent (e.g. Faumai Formation, Salawati Basin). Locally, carbonates of this age may form hydrocarbon reservoirs. Dolomite is variably recorded in these carbonates and the Tampur Formation, for example, contains extensive xenotopic dolomite. Neogene carbonates (e.g. Peutu Formation, North Sumatra) are commonly areally restricted, reef-dominated and developed in mixed carbonate-siliciclastic systems. They most typically show a strong diagenetic overprint with leaching, recrystallization, cementation and dolomitization all widespread. Hydrocarbon reservoirs are highly productive and common in carbonates of this age. Dolomite is variably distributed and its occurrence has been related to facies, karstification, proximity to carbonate margins and faults. The distribution and origin of the dolomite has been attributed to mixing-zone dolomitization (commonly in association with karstic processes), sulphate reduction via organic matter oxidation, and dewatering from the marine mudstones that commonly envelop the carbonate build-up. Dolomite has a variable association with reservoir quality in the region, and when developed as a replacive phase tends to be associated with improved porosity and permeability characteristics. This is particularly the case where it is developed as an early fabric-retentive phase. Cementing dolomite is detrimental to reservoir quality, although the extent of this degradation generally reflects the abundance and distribution of this dolomite. Dolomitization is also inferred to have influenced the distribution of non-hydrocarbon gases. This is best documented in North Sumatra where carbon dioxide occurs in quantities ranging from 0 to 85%. There are a number of possible mechanisms for generating this CO2 (e.g. mantle degassing), although the most likely source is considered to be the widely dolomitized Eocene Tampur Formation that forms effective basement for much of the basin. High heat flows are suggested to have resulted in the thermogenic decomposition of dolomite with CO2 produced as a by-product