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Enviroscan Ukrainian Institute of Speleology and Karstology

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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That backwater is the accumulated water above the normal level of a water course due to impoundment at a point downstream [16].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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8801 S YALE ST, TULSA, OK 74137 USA
Geophysics, 2004, Vol 69, Issue 1, p. 222-230
Inversion strategy in crosshole radar tomography using information of data subsets
Abstract:
Detecting discrete anomalies, such as cavities or tunnels, is an important application of crosshole radar tomography. However, crosshole tomographic inversion results are frequently ambiguous, showing smearing effects and inversion artifacts. These ambiguities lead to uncertainties in interpretation; hence, the size and position of anomalies can only be interpreted with limited accuracy and reliability. We present an inversion strategy for investigating discrete anomalies with crosshole radar tomography. In addition to the full traveltime data set, we use subsets of specified ray-angle intervals for tomographic inversion. By analyzing inversion results from different ray-angle intervals, a more accurate interpretation of anomalies is possible. The second step of our strategy is to develop a good inhomogeneous starting model from joint interpretation of the inversion results from different subsets. The third step is to invert the full data set using this new starting model and to evaluate the inversion results by analyzing the distributions of mean square traveltime residuals with respect to the ray angles. We use a synthetic model with two discrete anomalies located roughly at the same depth to demonstrate and evaluate our approach. This inversion strategy is also applied to a field data set collected to investigate karst cavities in limestone. From the inversion results of both examples, we show that horizontal smearing of anomalies can be reduced by eliminating near-horizontal rays. A good starting model can be obtained based on the joint interpretation of the inversion results of the different subsets; it leads to a high-resolution final image of the full data set