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Enviroscan Ukrainian Institute of Speleology and Karstology


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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That autogenic drainage is underground karst drainage that is derived entirely by absorption of meteoric water into the karst rock surface [9]. synonym: autochthonous drainage. see also allogenic drainage.?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms


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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for egypt (Keyword) returned 15 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 15
Lethargy in the cavernicolous Chiroptera in Central Africa., 1976,
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De Faveaux Michel Anciaux
From his personal research undertaken in the subterranean field (natural and artificial cavities) in Shaba (ex-Katanga, in S.E. Zaire) and Rwanda, the author briefly defines the macroclimate of the prospected regions as well as the microclimate of the subterranean habitat (humidity and temperature). A reversible hypothermia has been noticed in the dry season only (from May till August) in eleven species of troglophile Chiroptera belonging to the following families: Rhinolophidae (7 species of Rhinolophus), Hipposideridae (only Hipposideros ruber) and Vespertilionidae (Miniopterus inflatus rufus, Miniopterus schreibersi arenarius & M.s. natalensis, Myotis tricolor). No sign of lethargy has been noticed in the Megachiroptera (Lissonycteris angolensis, Rousettus aegyptiacus leachi), Emballonuridae (Taphozous perforatus sudani), Hipposideridae (Cloeotis percivali australis) or Nycteridae (3 species of Nycteris). There could be correlations between lethargy and breeding if one takes into account the phenomena of late ovulation and delayed implantation. The entry into lethargy is not caused by the scarcity of food. It does not concern all the individuals of a colony or in various populations of a cave. The degree of humidity appears to be more important than the temperature as far as the conditions for hibernation are concerned.

Hydrogeology of the Great Nubian Sandstone basin, Egypt, 1982,
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Shata A. A. ,
In Egypt, the strata of major hydrogeological interest are composed of a sandstone complex ranging from Cambrian to Upper Cretaceous in age. This sandstone complex, commonly known as the Nubian Sandstone, has a thickness varying from less than 500 m to more than 3000 m and rests directly on Precambrian basement. This simple picture is complicated by a number of major structural fault and fold axes which traverse the region in a north-easterly direction. The sandstones reach their max-imum development in the Ain Dalla basin, a downthrown structural block SW of Bahariya oasis. Basement features exercise a dominant control on the structural and sedimentological form of the sandstone complex. In spite of the structural complications, the Nubian sand-stone, underlying an extensive area of Egypt, probably con-stitutes a single hydrogeological system to the W of the Gulf of Suez. To the E, on the Sinai peninsula, a second system may exist with some connection to the main western system in the N. The main western system, which extends into Libya and Sudan, comprises a multi-layered artesian basin where huge groundwater storage reserves were accumulated, principally during the pluvials of the Quaternary. The carbonate rocks overlying the Nubian Sandstone complex display karst features locally and are recharged by upwards leakage from the underlying major aquifer. Large-scale development of the Nubian Sandstone aquifer in Egypt has been under consideration since 1960. Latest proposals for the New Valley development project involve exploitation at the annual rate of 156.2 x l06m3 at El-Kharga, 509.2 at

Karst landform development and related sediments in the Miocene rocks of the Red Sea coastal zone, Egypt, 1986,
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El Aref Mm, Awadalah F, Ahmed S,

Karst topography and karstification processes in the Eocene limestone plateau of El Bahariya Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt, 1987,
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El Aref M. M. , Abou Khadrah A. M. , Lotfy Z. H.

Sannur Cave: A Crescent shaped cave developed in Alabaster formation in Eastern Desert, Egypt, 1995,
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Gü, Nay G. , Elbedewy F. , Ekmekci M. , Bayari S. , Kurttas T.
An expedition to Egypt set out to explore the Wadi Sannur where no speleological work had taken place. The most notable karst feature identified to date is the Sannur Cave, the largest subterranean chamber known in Egypt. It is situated about 70 km to the southeast of Beni-Suef city in the remote Wadi Sannur of the Eastern Desert where the main rock units belong to Eocene and Pliocene periods. The Eocene is represented by limestone including alabaster which is known to be quarried first by the ancient Egyptians. Sannur Cave is first explored during blasting in the alabaster quarry which caused an artificial entrance to the cave. The cave is a single crescent shape chamber approximately 275 m long and can be arbitrarily divided into two sectionshaving different characteristics; left side gallery and right side gallery. Few speleothems occur in the left side gallery while the right side gallery is decorated intensively with many kinds of spelethem including stalagtites, stalagmites, flowstones, microgours, helictites and soda-straws etc. In addition to surveying the cave, based on the geologic, structural and morphologic observation inside and outside the cave some interpretations on the paleoenvironment an the origin of the cave. Surveying was performed with grade 5D according to BCRA Gradings.

Petrographic and Geochemical Screening of Speleothems for U-series Dating: An Example from Recrystallized Speleothems from Wadi Sannur Cavern, Egypt, 2002,
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Railsback, L. B. , Dabous, A. A. , Osmond, J. K. , Fleisher, C. J.
Petrographic and geochemical analyses of four speleothems from Wadi Sannur Cavern in eastern Egypt show that petrography and geochemistry can provide a useful way to screen speleothems prior to dating via U-series analysis. The speleothems vary from inclusion-rich zoned calcite to clear featureless calcite. U concentrations (ranging from 0.01-2.65 ppm) and Sr concentrations (ranging from 0.00-0.11 wt%) are greater in inclusion-rich zoned calcite. U concentrations are also greater in speleothems with small (<1.2 mm wide) columnar calcite crystals than in speleothems with larger crystals. Mg concentrations in the speleothems range from 0.2 to 2.3 mol% MgCO3 and show no significant relationship to petrography at the microscopic scale. Geochemical considerations suggest that the Wadi Sannur speleothems were originally mostly aragonite, and that all four have undergone recrystallization. More generally, they suggest that coarse clear columnar calcite and large (>1.0 ppm) ranges of U concentration are warning signs of recrystallization and U loss. However, even finer grained, inclusion-rich columnar calcite may be the result of recrystallization while retaining U contents less depleted than those of associated clear calcite.

Djara Cave in the Western Desert of Egypt: Morphology and evidence of Quaternary climatic change, 2003,
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Brook G. A. , Embabi N. S. , Ashour M. M. , Edwards R. L. , Hai Cheng Cowart J. B, Dabous A. A.

Caves and Karsts of Northeast Africa., 2003,
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Halliday William R.
At least potentially karstifiable rocks cover much of the surface of Egypt and northern Libya. Study of caves and other karstic features of this region has been hampered by lack of roads, rapid disintegration of the surface of friable, poorly consolidated limestone, wind-blown sand and other factors. Interbedding with marly aquicludes hampers speleogenesis locally. Calcareous and evaporite karsts are present, however, and their waters are important albeit generally limited resources. Large quantities of fresh water are lost through submarine springs downslope from Libya's Gebel al Akhdar range; the caves and karst of that range may be among the world's greatest. A recent attempted compendium of caves and karsts of Egypt and Libya contains several important errors; the supposed 5+ km Ain Zayanah Cave does not exist and the Zayanah System includes several smaller caves. The Bir al Ghanam gypsum karst of northwest Libya, however, has caves up to 3.5 km long. In Egypt, the Mokattam, South Galala, Ma'aza, Siwa and Western Desert karsts and the "White Desert" chalk karst of Farafra Depression are especially important. Qattara and nearby depressions may be karstic rather than structural in origin. Unique Wadi Sannur Cave is the world's largest gour and a potential World Heritage site. Little knownsandstone karsts or pseudokarsts in southwestern Egypt may contain analogues of features recently identified on Mars. The well-publicised Uweinat caves of northwestern Sudan are talus caves.

Quaternary environmental change in the western desert of Egypt: evidence from cave speleothems, spring tufas and playa sediments, 2003,
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Brook G. A. , Embabi N. S. , Ashour M. M. Et Al.

Symposium Abstract: Karst forms and karstification in Egypt, 2004,
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Embabi N. S.

Authigenic halloysite from El-Gideda iron ore, Bahria Oasis, Egypt: characterization and origin, 2004,
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Baioumy Hm, Hassan Ms,
Halloysite in El-Gideda iron mine occurs as very soft, light and white-to-pinkish white pockets and lenses ranging in diameter from 50 cm to 1 m within the iron ore. Highly hydrated halloysite is the main constituent of these pockets beside some kaolinite and alunite. The diffraction pattern of the clay fraction (<2 {micro}m) shows a rather broad and diffuse 001 reflection spread between 10.3 and 13.6{degrees}2{theta}. Upon treatment, the 001 reflection of halloysite expands up to 10.94 A and 11.9 A corresponding to ethylene glycol and dimethyl formamide treatment, respectively. After these treatments, kaolinite appeared with its characteristic basal spacing (~7 A ). The percentage of halloysite in halloysite-intercalated kaolinite ranged between 80 and 90%. Heating to 350{degrees}C, produces a kaolinite-like structure (~7.1 A ) that developed to a metakaolinite-structure when heated to 550{degrees}C. Morphologically, halloysite appears as well developed tubes composed entirely of SiO2 and Al2O3, while kaolinite is characterized by very fine platelets arranged in book-like or rosette-like shapes. A differential thermal analysis curve of the studied halloysite showed an endothermic peak at ~138{degrees}C due to the dehydration of interlayer water of halloysite. The small shoulder at ~540{degrees}C and the endothermic peak at ~593{degrees}C is attributed to the dehydroxylation of halloysite, kaolinite and alunite. On the other hand the exothermic peak that appeared at 995{degrees}C is due to the formation of new phases such as mullite and/or spinel. The infrared vibrational spectrum is typical of highly disordered halloysite and kaolinite. Halloysite was formed as a result of alteration of the overlying glauconite suggesting intensive chemical alteration during a humid wet period that prevailed in the Bahria Oasis during the late Eocene. Glauconite alteration releases K, Fe, silica and alumina. Iron forms at least part of the iron ore in the El-Gideda mine while alumina forms halloysite as well as alunite when interacted with silica in an acidic environment

maging subsurface cavities using geoelectric tomography and ground-penetrating radar., 2005,
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Elqady G. , Hafez M. , Abdalla M. A. , Ushijima K.
In the past few years, construction extended extraordinarily to the southeast of Cairo, Egypt, where limestone caves occur. The existence of caves and sinkholes represents a hazard for such new urban areas. Therefore, it is important to know the size, position, and depth of natural voids and cavities before building or reconstruction. Recently, cavity imaging using geophysical surveys has become common. In this paper, both geoelectric-resistivity tomography using a dipole-dipole array and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) have been applied to the east of Kattamya at Al-Amal Town, Cairo, to image shallow subsurface cavities. The state is planning to construct a new housing development there. The resistivity survey was conducted along three profiles over an exposed cave with unknown extensions. The radar survey was conducted over an area of 1040 m, and both sets of data were processed and interpreted integrally to image the cave as well as the shallow subsurface structure of the site. As a result, the cave at a depth of about 2 m and a width of about 4 m was detected using the geophysical data, which correlates with the -known cave system. Moreover, an extension of the detected cave has been inferred. The survey revealed that the area is also affected by vertical and nearly vertical linear fractures. Additionally, zones of marl and fractured limestone and some karstic features were mapped.

Suitability Assessment for New Minia City, Egypt: A GIS Approach to Engineering Geology, 2005,
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Aly Mh, Giardino Jr, Klein Ag,
Urban development is a high priority in Egypt. New Minia City, located on the eastern bank of the Nile River, approximately 250 km south of Cairo, is one of 16 new development communities. Urban development in New Minia City may encounter several geo-environmental problems. Karst conditions and structural features in the local heterogeneous bedrock limit its suitability for constructional purposes. In this research, suitability of the area for urban development was assessed using a geographic information systems (GIS)-based approach. A weighted GIS model that incorporated land use/cover, types of soil, karst feature distribution, fracture densities, slopes, distances to major faults and streams, road network, and city boundaries was established to create a map of site suitability for the city. Model weights were developed using the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) approach. Current urban land use within New Minia City falls into four classes of suitability. Approximately 7 percent of the area built by 2002 is in the low suitability class, which suggests that the map of site suitability can serve as a reliable base for planning sustainable development in New Minia City. The developed map of site suitability is effective for assessing and revealing ratings of suitability for urban development. Furthermore, the map of suitability provides the foundation for informed decision making in the development of New Minia City

MACROSCOPIC DIAGENETIC CHANGES IN LATE MIOCENE SPELEOTHEMS, WESTERN DESERT, EGYPT, 2012,
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Pickford, Martin

Understanding the diagenesis of speleothems is important on account of the fact that such deposits are often used for determining palaeoclimate parameters and for estimating the ages of speleothem growth. Impressive speleothem deposition of Vallesian age occurred in an immense palaeokarst network in the Western Desert, Egypt, the age of formation being determined on the basis of mammalian biochronology (fossils found in spelean clastic deposits intercalated between speleothems). Many of the Egyptian speleothems have been pervasively recrystallised internally, but their outer surfaces are usually well preserved except in the formations which were buried in clastic deposits, in which case the entire speleothem can be recrystallised. The recrystallisation results in large crystals (up to 20 cm diameter) growing radially outwards from the centre of stalagmites and stalactites, or at right angles to the outer surface of flowstone deposits. It is clear that crystal growth occurred without change of volume. Although the recrystallisation of speleothems in the Western Desert of Egypt resulted in the development of unusually large calcite crystals, it does indicate that diagenesis may be an important process that needs to be taken into account before speleothems in other karst systems can be used as raw material for unravelling palaeoclimatic and geochronological parameters. The gross morphology of the Egyptian speleothems is described in order to put on record the effects of diagenesis on them. The geochemistry of the speleothems remains to be studied.


PALEOKARST SHAFTS IN THE WESTERN DESERT OF EGYPT: A UNIQUE LANDSCAPE, 2013,
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Mostafa, Ashraf

The Eocene limestone plateau of the western Desert of Egypt has various karst features, including shafts created during ancient wet periods. These Paleokarst shafts have been investigated on the plateau to the west of the Nile valley, specifically northwest of Assiut. Most of these shafts are infilled by conglomerate (cemented flint, red soil and limestone chips) and appear as pockets in limestone hills. The morphology of the shafts and the characteristics of their infillings suggest that they developed in vadose zone at the base of epikarst limits. This stage probably took place from the end of Early Eocene to the Middle Miocene. A later, different stage of water erosion occurred, most probably during Pliocene/Pleistocene period. This stage led to remove the epikarst zone, and reshaped the area to create a hilly landscape penetrated by infilled shafts.


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