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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That fall is the gross slope of a river [16].?

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for home (Keyword) returned 89 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 89
Movements of Rhaphidophoridae (Orthoptera) In Caves At Waitomo, New Zealand, 1965, Richards, Aola M.

Cavernicolous Rhaphidophoridae are very active insects, in spite of their immobile appearance on the walls of caves. Movement is continuous to a greater or lesser degree throughout the 24 hour period of each day. Through marking a representative sample of the total adult population of two species of Rhaphidophoridae in limestone caves in New Zealand, it was shown that several different types of movement occurred; that home ranges had no well-defined limits; and that there was no evidence of territorial behaviour. The technique of marking Rhaphidophoridae is discussed in some detail.


Caves of Kitava and Tuma, Trobriand Islands, 1971, Ollier C. D. , Holdsworth D. K. , Heers G.

The Trobriand group of coral islands is situated a hundred miles off the north-east coast of Papua and north of the D 'Entr'ecasteaux Islands. In previous papers we have described caves on Kiriwina (the main island), Vakuta and Kitava (see References). We now describe caves of Kaileuna and Tuma (see Figures l and 2). In August 1970, we spent one week of intensive search for caves on these two islands, making our headquarters in the copra store in the village of Kadawaga. Kaileuna island is six miles long and almost four miles wide, and supports a population of 1,079 (1969 Census). It is separated from the large island of Kiriwina by a channel two miles wide between Mamamada Point and Boll Point, though the main village of Kadawaga on the west coast of Kaileuna is 18 miles from Losuia and 14 miles from Kaibola. The island is generally swampy in the centre with a rim of uplifted coral around the edge. We were assured that the correct name of the island is Laileula, but since Kaileuna is used on all previous maps it is retained here. However, we prefer Kadawaga to the Kudawaga or Kaduwaga that appear on some maps. The inhabitants are of mixed Melanesian-Polynesian Stock, who are almost totally self-supporting, being in the main farmers and fishermen. The yam (taitu) constitutes the staple crop and the harvest is still gathered in with ceremonies unchanged for centuries. There is great competition among families for the quantity and quality of the crop, which is displayed firstly in garden arbours (kalimonio), later in the village outside the houses; traditionally styled yam huts (bwaima) are then constructed to display the harvest until the next season. The transfer of yams from the garden to the village is occasion for a long procession of gatherers to parade through the village blowing conch shells and chanting traditional airs (sawili) to attract the attention of villagers to the harvesting party, After storage of the harvest, a period of dancing and feasting (milamala) continues for a month or more, Traditional clothing is the rule, Women and girls wear fibre skirts (doba), most of the men, especially the older ones, wear a pubic leaf (vivia) made from the sepal of the betel nut palm flower (Areca catechu Linn.). Tuma, the northernmost of the main islands in the Trobriand group, is six miles long and less than a mile wide. It is a low ridge of coral with swamps in the centre and along much of the western side. The island has been uninhabited since 1963 when the last few residents abandoned it and moved to Kiriwina, but it is still visited from time to time by other islanders who collect copra and fish. Tuma is believed by all Trobriand Islanders to be inhabited now by the spirits of the dead. It is also generally believed that Tuma is the original home of the TrobIiand ancestors; these ancestors are also said to have emerged at Labai Cave on Kiriwina Island, and from many other places of emergence or 'bwala". Lack of consistency in the legends does not appear to concern the Trobrianders very much. The cave maps in this paper are sketches based mainly on estimated dimensions, with a few actual measurements and compass bearings. Bwabwatu was surveyed more accurately, using a 100 ft steel reinforced tape and prismatic compass throughout.


Morphometric Analysis of Polygonal Karst in New Guinea, 1972, Williams Paul W. ,

Morphometric analysis of surface depressions in the Mangapu karst. MSc thesis University of Auckland, New Zealand, 1973, Pringle J. M.

Studies of the cave crayfish, Orconectes inermis inermis Cope (Decapoda, Cambaridae). Part IV: Mark-recapture procedures for estimating population size and movements of individuals., 1978, Hobbs Iii Horton H.
Several methods for permanently marking cavernicolous crayfishes were investigated prior to initiation of field work in Pless Cave, Lawrence County, Indiana. Internally injected ink complemented with external "painting" proved to be a most satisfactory tagging procedure. During the two-year study period 211 individuals of the troglobitic crayfish Orconectes inermis inermis Cope were marked; 96 tagged individuals were recaptured at least once, a 46% recapture rate. The population size was estimated to be 1586 +/- 79 (95 % C.L.) over the 540 m subterranean stream study area and remained relatively stable during the period of 1970 to 1972. The home range of male crayfishes is as high as 20 m and extends up to 23 m for females, although maximum distances travelled by individuals of both sexes greatly exceed these values. Small individuals of both sexes are displaced downstream whereas larger crayfish show distinct upstream movement. If all movement data are pooled, both sexes exhibit a net downstream movement. The downstream movement of crayfish is heavily influenced by flooding.

A new species of Rhachomyces (Ascomycetes, Laboulbeniales) parasitic on the troglobite Carabid beetle Speagonum mirabile Moore, from New-Guinea (Zoological Results of the British Speleological Expedition to Papua-New Guinea, 1975, 3)., 1978, Rossi Walter
Rhachomyces beronii n. sp., parasitic on Speagonum mirabile Moore (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Anchomenini) from New Guinea, is described. The new species resembles Rhachomyces tenuis Thaxt. in general habit, but it differs from the latter in having a smaller receptacle, a larger and less pigmented perithecium, a different structure of the appendages and in the multiplication of appendiculate cells.

Surface Lowering and Landform Evolution on Aldabra, 1979, Trudgill S. T. ,
Aldabra landforms are the result of the karstification of carbonate rocks distributed on surfaces which have been exposed to erosion for varying lengths of time. Morphometric analysis (which is of interest in both geomorphological and botanical contexts) suggests that the most well developed karst features (closed depressions) occur on what appear to be the oldest surfaces. Morphology also varies with lithology. Measurements of present-day erosion rates suggests that weakly cemented rocks and the most soluble mineral components are eroding most rapidly. The evolution of a dissected morphology is related to lithological heterogeneity in coralline rocks or, in the case of the more homogeneous rocks, to the short residence time of waters on the rock surface (the more rapidly dissolving mineral grains eroding faster). Dissolution also proceeds in fresh water pools, but this may be offset by precipitation in some cases. The surface is mostly case hardened, except under deep organic soils where erosion rates are much higher than in other areas. A mean erosion rate measured at 0.26 mm/a appears to make it feasible that large erosional features, such as the lagoon, could have been formed during periods of emersion as suggested by research workers who have hypothesized that an atoll shape may be substantially derived by subaerial weathering

Equilibrium Versus Events in River Behaviour and Blind Valleys at Yarrangobilly, New South Wales, 1980, Jennings J. N. , Haosheng Bao, Spate A. P.

Seventeen blind valleys of the Yarrangobilly karst are describes especially with reference to shifting streamsink location and phases of downward incision. A series of measures of them, based partly on ground traverses and partly on contoured maps, is presented and discussed. Standard morphometry of the basins ending in the blind valleys is presented also. These truncated basins are shown to have normal morphometric relationships. Whether a stream sinks or not in the limestone appears generally to relate to the length of limestone to be crossed in relation to full stream or basin length, though basin relief ratio may intervene. The hypothesis that there will be dynamic equilibrium between the dimensions of blind valleys and sinking stream catchments finds only limited support in the data. This is because underground stream capture represents an abnormal event in drainage basin development liable to upset equilibrium relationships and its timing may be adventitious in that development. With a larger population of blind valleys to be analysed, this factor of timing might become subordinate, and a batter predictive model of blind valley volume be derived.


Morphometry of Limestone Pavements of Farleton Knott, Cumbria, 1981, Goldie Helen S.

Investigations of the Troglobitic Crayfish Orconectes inermis testii (Hay) in Mayfield's Cave, Monroe County, Indiana., 1981, Hobbs Iii Horton H.
Mark-recapture studies of some aspects of the biology of the cavernicolous crayfish, Orconectes inermis testii (Hay), were conducted from December, 1969 to March, 1970, in Mayfield's Cave, Monroe County, Indiana. Population size was estimated to be 66 +/- 9 (95% C.L.) for the 300 m study area, but because of the small sample size, this is undoubtedly a deflated value. Size of animals, expressed as total length, indicates that the population was comprised primarily of adults. Seventy-four percent of the marked crayfish moved no more than 10.5 m away (total upstream and downstream distances) from the tagging site. Hence, this species appears to restrict its activities to a specific area ("home range") of up to 10.5 m of stream passage. Form I males travelled greater distances than did Form II (15.1 and 3.0 m, respectively), possibly in search of mates. Adult females moved less than juveniles, and males appeared to move greater distances than females (means of 12.9 and 5.9 m, respectively). Upstream movements were more commonly observed than downstream (mainly Form I males), indicating a possible restocking mechanism following floods. Distances travelled were not rebated to the size of individuals or to elapsed time.

Specific geomorphometry, 1981, Jarvis R. S.

A Morphometric and Geological Study of Limestone Pavements in South Wales, 1983, Lewis K.

Le point des recherches karstologiques en URSS, 1986, Kisselov V. , Klimchouk A. , Dubliansky V.
KARST RESEARCHES IN USSR - Karst researches in USSR have obtained a further development during these last years. Numerous regional investigations have been realised, especially in Crimea, Western Caucasus, Podolia, Ural, Central Asia and Southern Siberia. Some works on caves sedimentology have permitted to develop the knowledge on speleogenesis. Interesting studies are performed on speleoclimatology and ice caves (thermo-karst). Several contributions on the modern practical speleology are underlined: speleo-medicine, speleological techniques on steel cables, surveying, morphometry, applied speleology, show caves.

Evolutionary genetics and morphometrics of a cave crayfish population from Chiapas (Mexico), 1988, Allegrucci Giuliana, Baldari Fabiola, Cesaroni Donatella, Sbordoni Valerio
The recently explored Cueva de Los Camarones, in the remote village of Constitucion, Chiapas, Mexico, houses a unique highly variable population of Procambarus crayfish (Crustacea, Decapoda). Morphologically, a more or less clinal variation is revealed at several features such as the degree of rudimentation in both pigmentation and eye, and the elongation of body and appendages. Extremes are quite different, ranging from typical dark, thick, eyed individuals to light, elongated, microphtalmic phenotypes. Evolutionary relationships among individuals were investigated electrophoretically (25 structural gene loci) and morphometrically (12 characters) by means of multivariate analyses. Results from analysis of individual allozymic multilocus profiles indicate that the "light" phenotypes belong to a distinct gene pool with respect to the "dark" ones, but some level of introgression is hypothesized. Results from analysis of individual morphometric profiles also show a discrimination between light and dark samples, chiefly determined by the shape of the rostrum and chela. The existence of such a discontinuous variation both in morphometric and allozymic characters presumably reflects a history of allopatric divergence followed by secondary contact of the two species.

The morphometry and spatial distribution of surface depressions in gypsum, with examples from Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Manitoba. McMaster Univ. MSc thesis, 1990, Stenson R. E.

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