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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That fault line is the intersection of a fault with the surface of the earth or any other plane of reference [16].?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for imagery (Keyword) returned 17 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 17
Karst Hydrogeology and Infrared Imagery; An Example, 1972, Brown Mc,
Detection of a cold spring draining into Medicine Lake, Alberta

Numerical multisource and multiscale imagery in the study of the topographic surface. Hydrogeological application in a karstic environment: Verneuil-sur-Avre (Perche, France), 1996, Sykioti O. , Deffontaines B. , Chorowicz J. , Obert D. , Demarsily G. , Lauverjat J. , Carvalho J. ,
We propose a new method revealing geological structures and their possible relationships with water percolation. It is based on a combination of (1) numerical analysis of the topography (satellite imagery Landsat TM, HCMM, SAR-ERS1; digital elevation model and derived data: drainage network, slope map, summit level surfaces...); (2) classic geological approach (field work, geological mapping, gravimetry); and (3) hydrogeological approach (piezometric map, tracer experiments). The superimposition of these data into a geocoded data base leads to the identification and the location of morphostructures (synthetic structural map). Field data and tracer experiments confirm the validity of the results. We propose to take into consideration the present day stress regime in order to define main orientations of open fractures. In conclusion, this method provides structural information allowing a better understanding of geometry in karstic aquifers

Spaceborne imaging radar-C (SIR-C) observations of groundwater discharge and wetlands associated with the Chicxulub impact crater, northwestern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, 2001, Pope Kevin O. , Rejmankova Eliska, Paris Jack F. ,
Analyses of spaceborne imaging radar-C (SIR-C) data and field data from the northwestern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, demonstrate that spaceborne multifrequency polarimetric radars are excellent tools for characterizing patterns of wetland flooding. Seasonal flooding can be detected in most types of forest and marsh in the radar backscatter magnitude and phase data of both L and C band. Field observations made in the wet and dry seasons concurrent with the space missions and chemical analyses of floodwaters confirm that flooding is the product of discharge from the Yucatan aquifer, which consists of a fresh-water lens floating on seawater. This discharge controls the distribution of wetlands. Therefore, vegetation and flooding patterns, mapped with SIR-C imagery, provide valuable information on the hydrogeology of the region. Radar-image maps of wetlands and flooding indicate that there are three major zones of groundwater discharge that correlate with structures of the buried Chicxulub crater--zone 1 with the peak ring, zone 2 with the crater rim, and zone 3 with the exterior ring. Zone 1 has sulfate-poor discharge, unlike the sulfate-rich discharge in zones 2 and 3. The highest discharge is in zone 3, where the buried crater is closest to the surface. This groundwater-discharge pattern can be explained by tidal pumping of fresh water to the surface through high permeability zones developed in the Tertiary carbonates overlying crater faults and escarpments

Remote Sensing and GIS-Based Analysis of Cave Development in the Suoimuoi Catchment (Son La - NW Vietnam), 2002, Hung, L. Q. , Dinh, N. Q. , Batelaan, O. , Tam, V. T. , Lagrou, D.
Integration of remotely sensed imagery with ground surveys is a promising method in cave development studies. In this research a methodology was set up in which a variety of remote sensing and GIS techniques support cave analysis in the tropical karst area of the Suoimuoi catchment, NW Vietnam. In order to extract the maximum information from different remotely sensed data, the hue invariant IHS transformation was applied to integrate Landsat multispectral channels with the high resolution Landsat 7 ETM panchromatic channel. The resulting fused image was used, after enhancement, to visually and digitally extract lineaments. Aerial photos evaluated the extracted lineaments. Based on lineament density indices a fracture zone favorable for cave development is defined. The distance between caves and faults was investigated as well as the correspondence between the cave occurrence and the fracture zone.

The environmental hazards of locating wastewater impoundments in karst terrain, 2002, Memon B. A. , Azmeh M. M. , Pitts M. W. ,
A wastewater storage lagoon failed due to the development of a sinkhole at a site in the Lehigh River valley in Allentown, Pennsylvania (PA). The polluted wastewater from the lagoon entered into the underlying aquifer and moved within a narrow pathway controlled by cracks, fissures, and solution channels within the karstified Allentown Formation of the Cambrian Period. The Allentown Formation serves as the principal aquifer for the public water supply of the area. To develop appropriate remedial measures, a thorough understanding of the geologic setting was required. Therefore, a geologic and hydrogeologic characterization of the area was completed, aerial photography and satellite imagery interpretations were performed, stratigraphic core holes were drilled and geophysically logged, and the data correlated to define structural control and movement of ground water and pollutants. A number of wells were drilled and constructed, and water levels were monitored on a continuous basis to correlate with climatic changes and determine the direction of flow. Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed to delineate the vertical and lateral extent of migration of pollutants. Five saturated (water-bearing) zones were identified within the bedrock based on the analysis of cores and interpretation of geophysical logs. Ground water in the lower zones is polluted; the concentration of pollution increases with depth. Monitoring stations were established in the creek, south of the site, to measure flow rate several times during different seasons, and at different reaches, to determine the losing and gaining sections of the creek. Pumping tests were conducted to determine hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer. Based on the hydrogeologic model of the karstified aquifer, flow regime and structural control, a plan of action was defined and initiated to remediate the aquifer. The ground water is being remediated using a pump and treat methodology. The cleanup effort is continuous and the pollutant level is fluctuating with an overall-declining trend. The application of this technology has also created a pressure trough, thereby controlling off the site migration of pollutants. (C) 2002 Published by Elsevier Science B.V

Localization of saturated karst aquifer with magnetic resonance sounding and resistivity imagery, 2003, Vouillamoz J. M. , Legchenko A. , Albouy Y. , Bakalowicz M. , Baltassat J. M. , Alfares W. ,
To answer one of the main questions of hydrogeologists implementing boreholes or working on pollution questions in a karst environment-i.e., where is the ground water?-numerous tools including geophysics are used. However, the contribution of geophysics differs from one method to the other. The magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) method has the advantage of direct detection of ground water over other geophysical methods. Eight MRSs were implemented over a known karst conduit explored and mapped by speleologists to estimate the MRS ability to localize ground water. Two direct current resistivity imageries (DC-2D imagery) were also implemented to check their capability to map a known cave. We found that the MRS is a useful tool to locate ground water in karst as soon as the quantity of water is enough to be detected. The threshold quantity is a function of depth and it was estimated by forward modeling to propose a support graph to hydrogeologists. The measured MRS's signals could be used to calculate transmissivity and permeability estimators. These estimators were used to map and to draw a cross section of the case study site, which underline accurately the known karst conduit location and depth. We also found that the DC-2D imagery could underline the karst structures: It was able to detect the known cave through its associated faults. We prepared a computer simulation to check the depth of such a cave to induce resistivity anomaly which could be measured in similar conditions

Speleothem organic matter content imaging. The use of a Fluorescence Index to characterise the maximum emission wavelength, 2005, Perrette Y. , Delannoy J. J. , Desmet M. , Lignier V. , Destombes J. L. ,
The study of palacoenvironments, especially pedologic and biologic environments, is fundamental to a complete understanding of continental climate changes. Many types of sediment contain organic molecules (OM) that were trapped during the depositional process, with the quantity and the nature of these organic molecules being strongly influenced by climate and other local factors. The quantity of organic matter in sediment can be measured by fluorescence intensity, but its nature is more difficult to determine. For this research, the organic molecules in stalagmites were analysed using emission fluorescence spectroscopy. The analysis of carbonated karst sediments was complemented by studies of clay, soil and seepage water samples. The main objective of this paper is to describe a method for the continuous imaging of the spectroscopic features of stalagmite organic molecules. Continuous imaging provides a means of circumventing the nonlinearity, both in space (of the sediment) and in time (of the sedimentation process), of the trapping of organic matter. This methodological report presents a protocol for calculating a Fluorescence Index (FI) that can be used in palaeoenvironmental studies of sediment. A similar approach to that used for determining E4/E6 ratios was used to determine the ratio of the fluorescence intensities of a sample at 514 nm and at 456 nm. This Fluorescence Index is strongly correlated to the wavelength of the maximum intensity of the organic matter spectrum. Due to the relatively stable chemical environment of calcite growth, changes in the Fluorescence Index can be interpreted as being due to changes in the nature of the organic molecules rather than to pH or quenching effects. As an illustration of how this index can be used, we present some examples of fluorescence indices for speleothem samples that show short-term and long-term environmental changes. To allow fuller palaeoenvironmental interpretations to be made, fluorescence indices need to be calibrated to environments and samples need to be dated. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

Intrt des sdiments dtritiques endokarstiques en tant quarchive naturelle ? Discussion autour des dpts lacustres souterrains (Grottes de Choranche - Vercors), 2006, Perroux Annesophie
Interest of endokarstic detritic sediments as a natural archive? Discussion on underground lacustrine deposits (Choranche Caves Vercors) - Among the various natural environmental archives, the underground detritic deposits remained hitherto forgotten, in particular for high resolution analyses and treatments. Through the study of the sedimentary accumulation of the Cathedral Lake (Choranche Caves, Vercors), this paper shows the potential of information which these deposits contain. Sedimentary cores were sampled in the lake, various data are measured (granulometry, spectrocolorimetry, magnetic susceptibility and gray level imagery), then submitted to statistical processing (PCA, Passega images...) and signal treatment (wavelet decomposition). The stratigraphy of charcoal fragments trapped in the sediment and dated by the 14C method, does not appear sufficiently coherent to propose a satisfying age-depth model. Only some dates make it possible to suppose that the sedimentary filling of the lake covers at least the 4000 last years, with an average rate of sedimentation estimated at 1.87mm/yr. The other results of this work make it possible to understand transport and deposition dynamics of the sedimentary particles in an endokarstic lake, in particular with regard to flooding episodes. The Cathedral lake has a binary functioning, with mainly a fine sedimentation (decantation), punctually stopped by flooding episodes, which on their turn have two different dynamics (brutal or progressive phenomena in sedimentation). Lastly, the study of various signals highlights a great number of sedimentation control factors; these factors seem to act mainly on small time scales (more than 80 % of the granulometric signal variation are linked to phenomena with a period inferior to 40 years, according to the chronological framework supposed in the first assumption). This work carried in Choranche shows that endokarstic detritic sediments contain high resolution archives of the environmental evolutions. Subject to a chronological positioning more precise than the one we have today, paleoenvironmental interpretations and reconstitutions will make it possible to go further in their reading.

Identifying and characterizing solution conduits in karst aquifers through geospatial (GIS) analysis of porosity from borehole imagery: An example from the Biscayne aquifer, South Florida (USA), 2006, Manda A. K. , Gross M. R. ,
We apply geospatial analysis to borehole imagery in an effort to develop new techniques to evaluate the spatial distribution and internal structure of karst conduits. Remote sensing software is used to classify a high resolution, digital borehole image of limestone bedrock from the Biscayne aquifer (South Florida, USA) into a binary image divided into cells of rock matrix and pores. Within a GIS, 2D porosity is calculated for a series of rectangular sampling windows placed over the binary image and then plotted as a function of depth. Potential conduits that intersect the borehole are identified as peaks of high porosity. A second GIS technique identifies a conduit as a continuous object that spans the entire borehole width. According to these criteria, geospatial analysis reveals similar to 10 discrete conduits along the similar to 15 m borehole image. Continuous sampling of the geologic medium intersected by the borehole provides insight into the internal structure of karst aquifers and the evolution of karst features. Most importantly, this pilot study demonstrates that GIS-based techniques are capable of quantifying the depths, dimensions, shapes, apertures and connectivity of potential conduits, physical attributes that impact flow in karst aquifers. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

Structurally controlled hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies: An overview, 2006, Davies G. R. , Smith Jr. L. B.

Structurally controlled hydrothermal dolomite (HTD) reservoir facies and associated productive leached limestones are major hydrocarbon producers in North America and are receiving increased exploration attention globally. They include multiple trends in the Ordovician (locally, Silurian and Devonian) of the Michigan, Appalachian, and other basins of eastern Canada and the United States, and in the Devonian and Mississippian of the Western Canada sedimentary basin. They also occur in Jurassic hosts along rifted Atlantic margins, in the Jurassic–Cretaceous of the Arabian Gulf region and elsewhere. Hydrothermal dolomitization is defined as dolomitization occurring under burial conditions, commonly at shallow depths, by fluids (typically very saline) with temperature and pressure (T and P) higher than the ambient T and P of the host formation. The latter commonly is limestone. Proof of a hydrothermal origin for HTD reservoir facies requires integration of burial-thermal history plots, fluidinclusion temperature data, and constraints on timing of emplacement. Hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies are part of a spectrum of hydrothermal mineral deposits that include sedimentary-exhalative lead-zinc ore bodies and HTD-hostedMississippi Valley–type sulfide deposits. All three hydrothermal deposits show a strong structural control by extensional and/or strike-slip (wrench) faults, with fluid flowtypically focused at transtensional and dilational structural sites and in the hanging wall. Transtensional sags above negative flower structures on wrench faults are favored drilling sites for HTD reservoir facies. Saddle dolomite in both replacive and void-fillingmodes is characteristic of HTD facies. For many reservoirs, matrix-replacive dolomite and saddle dolomite appear to have formed near-contemporaneously and from the same fluid and temperature conditions. The original host facies exerts a major influence on the lateral extent of dolomitization, resultant textures, pore type, and pore volume. Breccias zebra fabrics, shear microfractures, and other rock characteristics record short-term shear stress and pore-fluid-pressure transients, particularly proximal to active faults. High-temperature hydrothermal pulses may alter kerogen in host limestones, a process designated ‘‘forced maturation.’’ basement highs, underlying sandstone (and/ or carbonate?) aquifers (probably overpressured), and overlying and internal shale seals and aquitards also may constrain or influence HTD emplacement. Although many questions and uncertainties remain, particularly in terms of Mg and brine source and mass balance, recognition and active exploration of the HTD play continues to expand. Increasing use of three-dimensional seismic imagery and seismic anomaly mapping, combined with horizontal drilling oblique to linear trends defined by structural sags, helps to reduce risk 


The importance of cave exploration to scientific research, 2007, Kambesis Patricia
Of the many objects of scientific interest, caves present a unique challenge because, except for entrance areas, caves are largely hidden from view. As a consequence, caves have not generally attracted the attention of mainstream scientists. With the exception of cave entrances noted on some topographic maps, most caves are not apparent from topographic maps, satellite and LANDSAT imagery, or aerial photographs. Caves and their features exist in an environment with no natural light and contain a myriad of physical and psychological obstacles. It is the cave explorer who ventures past these obstacles, motivated by curiosity and the desire to find and document places previously unknown. Systematic cave exploration is a two-fold process that involves the physical pursuit and discovery of caves and cave systems, and field documentation that provides baseline data in the form of cave survey data and notes, cave entrance and cave/karst feature locations and inventories, written observations, and photo-documentation. These data are synthesized into cave maps, topographic overlays, narrative descriptions, and reports that serve as exploration tools for finding more passages and caves. Systematic documentation and its derivative products also bring the hidden nature of caves and their features to the attention of scientists and provide a basis not only for cave-related research but for a wide range of related scientific endeavors.

The importance of cave exploration to scientific research, 2007, Kambesis, Patricia

Of the many objects of scientific interest, caves present a unique challenge because, except for entrance areas, caves are largely hidden from view. As a consequence,caves have not generally attracted the attention of mainstream scientists. With the exception of cave entrances noted on some topographic maps, most caves are not apparent from topographic maps, satellite and LANDSAT imagery, or aerial photographs. Caves and their features exist in an environment with no natural light and contain a myriad of physical and psychological obstacles. It is the cave explorer who ventures past these obstacles, motivated by curiosity and the desire to find and document places previously unknown. Systematic cave exploration is a two-fold process that involves the physical pursuit and discovery of caves and cave systems, and field documentation that provides baseline data in the form of cave survey data and notes, cave entrance and cave/karst feature locations and inventories, written observations, and photo-documentation. These data are synthesized into cave maps, topographic overlays,narrative descriptions, and reports that serve as exploration tools for finding more passages and caves. Systematic documentation and its derivative products also bring the hidden nature of caves and their features to the attention of scientists and provide a basis not only for cave-related research but for a wide range of related scientific endeavors.


Land cover mapping using Landsat satellite image classification in the Classical Karst - Kras region, 2007, Kokalj Ž, . , Oš, Tir K.

Such a diverse and sensitive eco-region as Karst needs to be managed with special attention and consideration of its natural and cultural resources. Land cover is an important indicator, which enables the analysis of their condition and development monitoring. Advanced satellite images classification represents an accurate and cost-effective alternative to the classical techniques of land cover mapping. The methods used to produce a reliable land cover map are presented in this paper. The complexity of the area requires a combination of various data such as Landsat satellite images, digital elevation model, digital orthophotos as well as existing topographic and thematic maps. The maximum likelihood algorithm was used as the main classifier and the accuracy of results was further improved by fuzzy classification, altitude and inclination filtering and auxiliary data integration.


A REVIEW OF THE FOREST MANAGEMENT HISTORY AND PRESENT STATE OF THE HARAGISTYA KARST PLATEAU (AGGTELEK KARST, HUNGARY), 2007, Taná, Cs E. , Szmorad F. , Bá, Rá, Nykevei I.

The potential vegetation of Hungarian karsts is mainly mixed deciduous forest; consequently forest management is a key issue in the sustainable management of our karsts. In this study we attempt to describe on the example of the Haragistya karst plateau how the forests of the Aggtelek karst region were used in the last few centuries and to what extent they were affected by anthropogenic activity. Investigating change patterns in the context of land use history provides useful information for future management. For the analysis we used an integrated GIS of historical data (18th-19th century military maps, old forest management plans, aerial imagery etc.). Our study area, the Haragistya, is situated in the northern part of Aggtelek Mountains at 400-600 m above sea level. The forests of this karst plateau have been subject to significant human impact over the centuries. Anthropogenic influence gradually decreased over the 20th century and with the area being taken into state management the irregular and often exaggerated use has stopped.


Investigating Ancient Maya Agricultural Adaptation through Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Analysis of Karst Terrain , Northern Yucat n, Mexico, 2010, Munro Stasiuk Mandy J. & Manahan T. Kam
Landscape adaptation on the Northern Yucatn Peninsula, Mexico, is particularly difficult, as soils are thin and the terrain is devoid of any surface water other than the occasional sinkhole (cenote) that connects directly to the groundwater system. Despite this, ancient Maya cities, including Xuenkal, emerged and thrived, likely because of their proximity to natural sinkholes. In the case of Xuenkal, these sinkholes, known locally as rejolladas, have bases above the local water table and, as such, do not provide direct access to the underlying water, but they provide closer access. Recognizing that the presence of rejolladas was likely important to the ancient Maya the purpose of this study is to characterize the rejolladas in terms of their subsurface characteristics, specifically bedrock configuration and soil. Ground penetrating radar analysis, as well as the results of a test pit excavation, confirm the presence of deep soils in the rejollada bases. It seems that the smaller deeper rejolladas have the thickest soils and sediment. The ancient city of Xuenkal is constructed amidst a particularly dense cluster of rejolladas which may have contributed to its location. Rejolladas, containing significantly thicker soils than the surrounding karst surface, and the ability to sustain dense healthy vegetation would have been particularly desirable for the Maya to capitalize on.

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