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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That discontinuity is 1. a point where a mathematical function becomes nondefined [16]. 2. an unconformity in which the bedding planes above and below the break are basically parallel, indicating a significant hiatus in the orderly sequence of sedimentary rocks. 3. a surface at which seismic-wave velocities abruptly change.?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for interference (Keyword) returned 11 results for the whole karstbase:
A Triple Dye Tracing Experiment At Yarrangobilly, 1976, Spate A. P. , Jennings J. N. , Ingle Smith D. , James Julia M.

Rhodamine WT, leucophor HBS and fluorescein were inserted into Deep, Eagles Nest and Traverse Creeks respectively, all sinking wholly or partly into the limestone at Yarrangobilly, as part of a program to determine the catchment area of Hollin Cave. Hollin Cave and three other major springs, together with the Yarrangobilly River above, between and below these springs, were sampled for various periods manually or by machine. Heavy rains began a day after dye insertion. Various lines of evidence and analysis, including the plotting of regression residuals between different wavebands as time series, showed that the relevant fluorescent wavebands were affected by rises in natural fluorescence in the runoff, probably of organic origin. Green was affected most, then blue, and orange only slightly. It was possible to identify a dye pulse of rhodamine at Hollin Cave, most probably representing all the dye put in. A leucophor dye pulse was also identifiable here but a load curve could not be constructed because of probable interference by changing natural fluorescence. Tracing by fluorescein became impossible. Interference between the three dyes was demonstrated. The implications for future quantitative tracing here are discussed.


Bungonia Caves and Gorge, A New View of Their Geology and Geomorphology, 1979, James Julia M. , Francis G. , Jennings J. N.

Work done at Bungonia since 1972 has filled gaps in our knowledge of this area. Water tracing has proven the earlier interference that the waters of all the major caves of the Lookdown Limestone and the uvula containing College Cave go to Efflux. Geological remapping shows that faulting allows these connections all to lie in limestone and accounts for the drainage of B4-5 away from the gorge. A 45m phreatic loop identified in Odyssey Cave, exceptionally large for south-eastern Australia, is also accounted for by the geological structure. Phoenix Cave has two successive cave levels similar to those of B4-5. The perched nature of the Efflux now finds a structural control in that the Folly Point Fault has interposed impervious beds between this spring and the gorge. Further analysis of the evidence relating the age of uplift and incision in the Shoalhaven and its tributaries strengthens the case for setting these in the lower Tertiary whereas most of the caves cannot be regarded as other than young. The geological remapping can partly account for the age discrepancy between underground and surface forms found at Bungonia.


Further Studies at the Blue Waterholes, Cooleman Plain, N.S.W., 1969-77, Part I, Climate and Hydrology, 1983, Jennings, J. N.

Previous study of the temporal and spatial distribution of limestone solution at Cooleman Plain rested on monthly discharges and water analyses of the Blue Waterholes over 4 years. For this study automatic recording of discharge (8 years), rainfall (8 years), evaporation (7 years) and temperature (4 years) was attended by variable success in the face of interference, rigorous climate and inaccessibility. The most important aspect of the climatic data was the support obtained for the earlier assumption of similar water balances in the forested igneous frame and the grassland limestone plain. Runoff was again shown to be highly variable from year to year and to have an oceanic pluvial regime, with a summer-autumn minimum owing much to evapo-transpiration. The flow duration curve from daily discharges puts this karst amongst those where neither extremely high nor low flows are important. The stream routing pattern offsets the effect of 71% of the catchment being on non-karst rocks, damping flood events. An inflection of 700 l/s in a flow duration plot based on discharge class means is interpreted as the threshold at which surface flow down North Branch reaches the Blue Waterholes. Storages calculated from a generalised recession hydrograph parallel Mendip data where baseflow (fissure) storage provides most of the storage and quickflow (vadose) storage only a secondary part. Water-filled conduit storage (the phreas) could not be determined but is considered small. The baseflow storage seems large, suggesting that it can develop independently of caves in some measure. A quickflow ratio for floods derived by Gunn's modification of the Hewlett and Hibbert separation line method appears relatively low for a mainly non-karst catchment and is again attributed to the routing pattern. For analysis of variation of the solute load over time, estimates of daily discharge during gaps in the record where made for the author by Dr. A.J. Jakeman and Mr. M.A. Greenaway (see Appendix). A small number of discharge measures of two contrasted allogenic catchments of the igneous frame shows a unit area yield close to that for the whole catchment. Together with the guaging of most of the allogenic inputs, this supports the idea that the water yield is much the same from the forested ranges and the grassland plain. This is important for the estimation of limestone removal rates.


Cave to Surface Communications, 1985, Allum, Ron

The reasons for needing a cave to surface communication system are many, including safety, search and rescue, surveying, science, exploration and commentary. Ideally a unit should be lightweight, portable, robust, easy to operate, have adequate range and be able to communicate speech intelligibly in both directions. The unit described here was designed specifically for use on the 1983 Cocklebiddy Cave expedition. When considering design parameters for a communication system there are many limitations, but in a cave as large as Cocklebiddy these can be less of a restriction. The unit as used does not meet all of the above criteria as an ideal system for all caves, but it worked well in Cocklebiddy Cave, conveying our speech intelligibly with tolerable noise and interference levels.


A record of multistage continental break-up on the Brianconnais marginal plateau (Western Alps): Early and Middle-Late Jurassic rifting, 1999, Claudel Me, Dumont T,
The Brianconnais series in the French Western Alps near Briancon bear evidence of extensional deformation preceding Alpine shortening. Most of these structures have been ascribed to Tethyan rifting processes. However, many of them are younger than the initial opening of the Ligurian Tethys ocean (Late Bajocian-Early Bathonian) and have a different orientation than the syn-rift faults. The combined use of sedimentological, stratigraphic, paleostructural and structural methods allows to distinguish the features related to the Tethyan rifting (Early to early Middle Jurassic) from the younger extensional deformation (Late Jurassic) which in part overprinted them: The Tethyan rifting is marked by a subaerial erosional surface (breakup unconformity), bearing karsts which developed along syn-rift faults. The continental to shallow marine diagenetic inprints are analysed (diagenetic log method). The Tethyan syn-rift uplift occurred as pulses from the early Late Triassic (Champcella type units) to the late Early Liassic (Peyre-Haute unit), whereas Tethyan post-rift drowning was synchronous (Late Bathonian thermal subsidence). We propose that the post-break-up extensional deformation (Late Jurassic) is linked with intracontinental rifting of the Atlantic realm (Bay of Biscay and/or Valais rifts). Therefore, the pre-Alpine deformations recorded in the Brianconnais series may result from the interference between different Mesozoic rifting-spreading cycles. Alpine inversion processes are more complex than previously thought since (1) the pre-Alpine structural grain was made of at least two, nearly perpendicular trends, (2) convergence changed in orientation through time, making it possible to reactivate preferentially either one or the other trend, and (3) significant nappe rotations are expected, which may be considered for palinspastic restoration. This has important paleogeographic implications, i.e. the present-day upper units of the Brianconnais pile are not necessarily derived from more distal parts of the Tethyan margin than the lower ones since they may have suffered important lateral, possibly northward, transport before final outward stacking

Role of stratigraphic elements in speleogenesis: the speleoinception concept, 2000, Lowe D. J.
Inception, the earliest phase of cave development, may begin during diagenesis. Within sedimentary rock sequences inception is generally related to specific favorable horizons or zones within the rock mass. These relatively thin inception horizons tend to display atypical chemical and/or physical properties, compared to the primary properties of the bulk of potentially cavernous rock successions. Commonly they correspond to depositional breaks or interruptions, particularly boundaries between major depositional cycles. Thus, according to the Inception Horizon Hypothesis, inception in sedimentary sequences (as typified by carbonate rocks) is inevitably related to, and guided by, thin relatively impure layers within thicker, otherwise pure beds, or at boundaries between impure and pure lithologies. Growth of incipient voids occurs potentially across the full lateral extent of inception horizons, generally very slowly during extended timescales. Growth may progress simultaneously at more than one stratigraphic level in a sequence, in deeply buried, confined or artesian conditions. Voids along individual inception horizons can be linked hydrologically by others that form concurrently or subsequently along tectonic or lithogenetic fissures. Later, interference between the imprinted inception framework and evolving surface landscapes leads to structurally advantageous elements of the potential three dimensional network being selected, linked and enlarged to form the skeletons of developing cave systems.

Les dolines deffondrement et les dolines-lacs des Causses du sud-ouest du Moyen-Atlas (Maroc) : des dpressions lies un contexte hydro-morphologique particulier (p. 19-24), 2001, Elkhalki Yahia, Akdim Brahim
The karstic geosystems of the Causses in the Middle Atlas present a number of old and present karstic landforms. The interference between karstic geomorphology and the process of deep karstification find expression in an important development of sinkholes and collapse zones. Inventory and spatial distribution of these superficial karstic landforms show a very close relationship with the apparition of saline springs. Water chemistry and the exported rock tonnage are analysed and point out the importance of caverning, which takes place in gypsum and salt Triassic formations.

Legal impediments to utilizing groundwater as a municipal water supply source in karst terrain in the United States, 2002, Richardson J. J. ,
Many jurisdictions presently utilize, or are now considering the utilization of, high-volume wells as a municipal water supply source. Withdrawal of groundwater in karst regions implicates rights to use groundwater and possible interference with other rights of nearby landowners. Drought conditions and increased population contribute to an increased incidence of legal disputes over the use of groundwater as a municipal water supply source in karst regions. High-volume pumping of groundwater may cause land subsidence, including sinkholes, drying of springs and/or streams and loss in value of nearby land. This paper examines the legal causes of action available to landowners adversely affected by high-volume groundwater pumping: groundwater rights, 'loss of lateral and subjacent support', nuisance, and 'takings'. The author concludes that the law fails to include environmental and geoscience considerations. State legislatures should consider legislative changes to unify legal and scientific principles

Unraveling the Origin of Carbonate Platform Cyclothems in the Upper Triassic Durrenstein Formation (Dolomites, Italy), 2003, Preto Nereo, Hinnov Linda A. ,
Facies analysis of the Durrenstein Formation, central-eastern Dolomites, northern Italy, indicates that this unit was deposited on a carbonate ramp, as evidenced by the lack of a shelf break, slope facies, or a reef margin, together with the occurrence of a 'molechfor' biological association. Its deposition following the accumulation of rimmed carbonate platforms during the Ladinian and Early Carnian marks a major shift in growth mode of the Triassic shallow marine carbonates in the Dolomites. The Durrenstein Formation is characterized by a hierarchical cyclicity, with elements strongly suggestive of an allocyclic origin, including (a) subaerial exposure features directly above subtidal facies within meter-scale cyclothems, (b) purely subtidal carbonate cyclothems, (c) symmetric peritidal carbonate cyclothems, and (d) continuity of cyclothems of different orders through facies boundaries. The Durrenstein cyclothems are usually defined by transgressive and regressive successions, and so most of them probably originated from sea-level oscillations. Their allocyclic origin allows their use for high-resolution correlations over distances up to 30 km. A stratigraphic section in the Tre Cime di Lavaredo area, encompassing the upper part of the Durrenstein Formation and the lower part of the overlying Raibl Formation (Upper Carnian) was studied using time-frequency analysis. A strong Milankovitch signal appeared when interference arising from a variable sedimentation rate was estimated and removed by tuning the short precession line in a spectrogram. All of the principal periodicities related to the precession index and eccentricity, calculated for 220 Ma, are present: P1 (21.9 ky); P2 (17.8 ky); E1 (400 ky), E2 (95 ky), and E3 (125 ky), along with a peak at a frequency double that of the precession, which is a predicted feature of orbitally forced insolation at the equator. Components possibly related to Earth's obliquity at ca. 35 ky and ca. 46 ky are present as well. The recovery of Milankovitch periodicities allows reconstruction of a high-resolution timescale that is in good agreement with published durations of the Carnian based on radiometric ages. The recognition of a Milankovitch signal in the Durrenstein and lower Raibl formations, as well as in other Mesozoic carbonate platforms, strongly supports a deterministic and predictable--rather than stochastic--control on the formation of carbonate platforms. Carbonate platforms might thus be used in the future for the construction of an astronomical time scale for the Mesozoic

Hazard connected to railway tunnel construction in karstic area: applied geomorphological and hydrogeological surveys, 2005, Casagrande G, Cucchi R, Zini L,
In a mature karstic system, the realisation of galleries using the methodology of railway tunnel boring machine (TBM) involves particular problems due to the high risk of interference with groundwater (often subject to remarkable level variations) and with cavities and/or thick fill deposits. In order to define groundwater features it is necessary to investigate both hydrodynamic and karstification. To define and quantify the karst phenomenon in the epikarst of the Trieste Karst (Italy), an applied geomorphological approach has been experimented with surface and cavity surveys. The surface surveys have contributed to determining the potential karst versus the different outcropping lithologies and to define the structural setting of the rocky mass also through the realisation of geostructural stations and the survey of the main lines thanks to photo-interpretation. Moreover, all the dolines and the cavities present in the area interested by the gallery have been studied by analysing the probable extension of caves and/or of the secondary fill deposits and by evaluating the different genetic models. In an area 900 ra large and 27 km long, which has been studied because of the underground karst, there are 41 dolines having diameters superior to 100 m and 93 dolines whose diameters range between 100 and 50 m; the dolines whose diameters are inferior to 50 m are 282. The entrances of known and registered cavities in the cadastre records are 520. The hypogeal surveys have shown 5 typologies in which it has been possible to group all the cavities present in a hypothetical intersection with the excavation. The comparison between surface and hypogeal structural data and the direction of development of cavities has allowed for the definition of highly karstified discontinuity families, thus having a higher risk. The comparison of the collected data has enabled to identify the lithologies and areas having major risk and thus to quantify the probability of intersection with the different cavity typologies for each area. To make an example, out of 27 000 m of studied gallery 3930 are the metres expected to be at very high 'karst risk'. Out of these, as a whole 3 10 are risky because of the probable presence of gallery cavities, 2170 because of the probable presence of pits and sinkholes diffusely present under the dolines, and along 1450 m karst is particularly intense. Moreover, 2200 should be the metres in which the rocky mass will be particularly divided because of tectonic causes. From a hydrogeological point of view a monitoring of water level has started to quantify water excursion, due to closeness of the railway tunnel to the mean water level. First results related to galleries intersection are here presented

Coastal cave in Bahamain eolian calcarenites: Differentiating between sea caves and flank margin caves using quantitative morphology, 2010, Waterstrat, Willapa J. , Mylroie, John E. , Owen, Athena M. And Mylroie, Joan R.

Coastal areas on carbonate islands commonly contain two types of caves: sea caves developed by wave erosion processes, and flank margin caves developed by dissolution at the edge of the fresh-water lens. Differentiating sea caves and flank margin caves in coastal settings is important, but can it be done reliably and quantitatively? Current methods use the degree of intricate wall-rock dissolution and the presence or absence of dense calcite speleothems to separate the two cave types. This study reports how analysis of cave maps creates three separate tools to differentiate coastal caves: area to perimeter ratio, entrance width to maximum width ratio, and rectangle short axis to long axis ratio. The study also presents some of the first sea cave data from eogenetic carbonate islands, specifically eolian calcarenites. The morphological and geometrical comparisons between Bahamian flank margin cave and sea cave maps using the three tools allows the two cave types to be statistically differentiated. The Bahamian sea cave data were also compared to sea cave data from California and Maine to demonstrate that Bahamian sea caves have a unique quantitative signature based on the youth and homogeneity of the host eolian calcarenite rock. The Bahamian sea cave data also indicate that sea cave formation may not be solely determined by differential rock weaknesses, as reported in the literature, but may also be a result of wave dynamics such as constructive interference.


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