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Enviroscan Ukrainian Institute of Speleology and Karstology


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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That pitted plain is plain having numerous small closely spaced closed depressions [10].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms


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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
See all featured articles from other geoscience journals

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Your search for junctions (Keyword) returned 8 results for the whole karstbase:
Le massif du Seuil : organisation des rseaux souterrains (Chartreuse, France), 1994,
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Loiseleur, B.
The Seuil massif (?13 km2) is located east of the Chartreuse massif North and south of the massif some of the most important cave systems in France are to be found. The two main underground systems of the Seuil which are not connected, are the Mort R cave (? 7 km long) and the Guiers-Vif system ( 15 kin long) connected with the trou des Flammes. Over the last few years, the knowledge of these systems has increased signifi-cantly and some junctions have been made with the plateau (Masques - Mort Ru; Tasurinchi -Guiers-Vif; Trou des Flammes Guiers-Vif). But the Malissard river, the main branch of the Guiers-Vif, is located under the Lances de Malissard, on the western end of the massif This location can be explai-ned by the typical order of the synclinal axis. The local cavers hope to find a system, comparable to that of Dent de Crolles and Alpe. The main collector seems to be in the axis of the massif along the GR9 fault. A comparison between the Chartreuse systems therefore shows that there seems to be reasonable hope in the years to come.

Radon transport phenomena studied in Karst caves-international experiences on radon levels and exposures, 1997,
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Hakl J. , Hunyadi I. , Csige I. , Geczy G. , Lenart L. , Varhegyi A. ,
The results of radon measurements in caves obtained by using of nuclear track detectors are summarized. Mean radon concentrations are ranging worldwide from 0.1 to 20 kBqm-3 with 2.8 kBqm-3 arithmetic average. From long-term extended radon measurements in caves not only a detailed dosimetric picture can be drawn, but using radon gas as a radioactive tracer, the subsurface and near-to-surface transport processes can be studied, too. It will be shown that long-term radon monitoring by nuclear track detectors, in conjunctions with active detectors which enables detection of fast dynamic changes, offers very important information for naturally-occurring transport processes

Flow pattern variability in natural fracture intersections, 1999,
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Kosakowski G. , Berkowitz B. ,
We use numerical simulations to examine the variability of flow patterns in representative fracture intersection geometries. In contrast to existing studies of perfectly orthogonal intersections, we demonstrate that more realistic geometries lead to a rich spectrum of flow patterns. Moreover, numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations in these fracture intersections indicate that non-linear inertial effects become important for Reynolds numbers as tow as 1-100. Such Reynolds numbers often exist in naturally fractured formations, particularly in karst systems and in the vicinity of wells during pump tests

Karst and caves of headstreams of the Lena River , 2011,
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Philippov V. M. , Filippov A. G. , Indyukov A. E.

Karst phenomena of headstreams of the Lena River in Eastern Siberia between junctions of the Zolotokan Creek and  Chanchur River are described in the paper. Wide spreading of karst is determined by: areal occurrence of marine carbonate rocks  of the Lower and Middle Cambrian, their monoclinal bedding, increased tectonical fracturing of karstiferous rocks, relatively high  roughness of surface topography, flattened dividing ranges, relatively humid climate (precipitation 400-500 mm per year), and long  history of continental regime of the area. The relics of ancient gently sloped river valleys at dividing ranges are the most karstified.  There is no surface drainage in their limits, and groups of dolines up to 40-80 individuals per square kilometer are common. Karst  development determines an existence of vast meadows covered with the dwarf birch, reindeer moss and herbs (Trollius asiaticus Scutellaria baialensis, Rhodiola rosea, Veratrum lobelianum, Gentiana sp., Allium sp. .) among stocked coniferous taiga at  the altitude of 1080-1150 m a.s.l. at the watershed divides of the Lena and Levaya Tongoda rivers (Mongolian Steppe Stow), and  Lena and Pankucha-2nd rivers. On the rest of the territory, dolines do not form large groups, but they occur as isolated individuals  or scattered clusters consisting of 3 to 5 individuals. Karst dry valleys are widely spread. Their total length is not less than 397  km, and 126 km of them belongs to the watershed of the Yukhta-1st River. Residual hills having morphology of pillars, towers and  ridges were observed. Descriptions of two karst caves and two crevice caves are given


Karst and caves of headstreams of the Lena River, 2011,
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Philippov V. M. , Filippov A. G. , Indyukov A. E.

Karst phenomena of headstreams of the Lena River in Eastern Siberia between junctions of the Zolotokan Creek and Chanchur River are described in the paper. Wide spreading of karst is determined by: areal occurrence of marine carbonate rocks of the Lower and Middle Cambrian, their monoclinal bedding, increased tectonical fracturing of karstiferous rocks, relatively high roughness of surface topography, flattened dividing ranges, relatively humid climate (precipitation 400-500 mm per year), and long history of continental regime of the area. The relics of ancient gently sloped river valleys at dividing ranges are the most karstified. There is no surface drainage in their limits, and groups of dolines up to 40-80 individuals per square kilometer are common. Karst development determines an existence of vast meadows covered with the dwarf birch, reindeer moss and herbs (Trollius asiaticus Scutellaria baialensis, Rhodiola rosea, Veratrum lobelianum, Gentiana sp., Allium sp. .) among stocked coniferous taiga at the altitude of 1080-1150 m a.s.l. at the watershed divides of the Lena and Levaya Tongoda rivers (Mongolian Steppe Stow), and Lena and Pankucha-2nd rivers. On the rest of the territory, dolines do not form large groups, but they occur as isolated individuals or scattered clusters consisting of 3 to 5 individuals. Karst dry valleys are widely spread. Their total length is not less than 397 km, and 126 km of them belongs to the watershed of the Yukhta-1st River. Residual hills having morphology of pillars, towers and ridges were observed. Descriptions of two karst caves and two crevice caves are given.

 


Speleogenetic effects of interaction between deeply derived fracture-conduit and intrastratal matrix flow in hypogene karst settings, 2012,
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Klimchouk A. B. , Tymokhina E. I. , Amelichev G. N.

In carbonate rocks, especially in those with high primary porosity such as most Cenozoic carbonates, the interaction between deeply derived rising flow through sub-vertical fracture-controlled conduits and intrastratal matrix flow of shallower systems can invoke mixing corrosion and result in prominent speleogenetic effects. This paper outlines a conceptual model of such interaction and provides instructive field examples of relevant morphological effects from two different regions within the Prichernomorsky (north Black Sea) basin, where karst features are developed in lower Pliocene, Eocene and Paleocene limestones. In the Crimean fore-mountain region, extensive steep to vertical limestone scarps formed through recent exposure of hypogenic fracture-controlled conduits provide outstanding possibilities to directly examine details of the original karstic porosity. The morphological effects of the conduit/matrix interaction, documented in both caves and exposed scarps, include lateral widening of sub-vertical conduits within the interaction intervals (formation of lateral notches and niches) and the development of side bedding-parallel conduits, pockets and vuggy-spongework zones. Natural convection circulation, invoked by interaction of the two flow systems, spreads the morphological effects throughout the conduit space above the interaction interval. Where the interaction of the two flow systems is particularly strongly localized, such as along junctions of two vertical fracture sets, the resultant morphological effect can take the form of isolated chambers. The variety of speleogenetic features developed through the conduit/matrix interaction, can be broadly grouped into two categories: 1) variously shaped swells of the major fracture conduit itself (morphological features of its walls – niches and pockets), and 2) features of the vuggy-spongework halo surrounding the conduit. This halo includes clustered and stratiform cavities, spongework zones and lateral side conduits. The speleogenetic features due to conduit/matrix flow interaction, especially the halo forms, often demonstrate distinct asymmetry between opposite walls of the conduits. The prominent phenomenon of the vuggy-spongework halo around fracture-controlled conduits has important hydrogeological implications. A comparison of karst features in different regions and rock formations clearly shows that in spite of some distinctions imposed by local structural, sedimentological and paleo-hydrogeological peculiarities, hypogenic speleoforms in limestones of different age and of different degree of diagenetic maturity demonstrate remarkable similarities.


Karst and caves of headstreams of the Lena River, 2012,
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Philippov V. M. , Filippov A. G. , Indyukov A. E.

Karst phenomena of headstreams of the Lena River in Eastern Siberia between junctions of the Zolotokan Creek and Chanchur River are described in the paper. Wide spreading of karst is determined by: areal occurrence of marine carbonate rocks of the Lower and Middle Cambrian, their monoclinal bedding, increased tectonical fracturing of karstiferous rocks, relatively high roughness of surface topography, flattened dividing ranges, relatively humid climate (precipitation 400-500 mm per year), and long history of continental regime of the area. The relics of ancient gently sloped river valleys at dividing ranges are the most karstified. There is no surface drainage in their limits, and groups of dolines up to 40-80 individuals per square kilometer are common. Karst development determines an existence of vast meadows covered with the dwarf birch, reindeer moss and herbs (Trollius asiaticus, Scutellaria baialensis, Rhodiola rosea, Veratrum lobelianum, Gentiana sp., Allium sp. .) among stocked coniferous taiga at the altitude of 1080-1150 m a.s.l. at the watershed divides of the Lena and Levaya Tongoda rivers (Mongolian Steppe Stow), and Lena and Pankucha-2nd rivers. On the rest of the territory, dolines do not form large groups, but they occur as isolated individuals or scattered clusters consisting of 3 to 5 individuals. Karst dry valleys are widely spread. Their total length is not less than 397 km, and 126 km of them belongs to the watershed of the Yukhta-1st River. Residual hills having morphology of pillars, towers and ridges were observed. Descriptions of two karst caves and two crevice caves are given.


Hydrogeological approach to distinguishing hypogene speleogenesis settings, 2013,
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Klimchouk, A. B.

The hydrogeological approach to defining hypogene speleogenesis (HS) relates it to ascending groundwater flow (AF). HS develops where AF causes local disequilibria conditions favoring dissolution and supports them during sufficiently long time in course of the geodynamic and hydrogeological evolution. The disequilibrium conditions at depth are invoked by changing physical-chemical parameters along an AF paths, or/and by the interaction between circulation systems of different scales and hydrody-namic regimes. The association of HS with AF suggests a possibility to discern regulari-ties of development and distribution of HS from the perspectives of the regional hy-drogeological analysis. In mature artesian basins of the cratonic type, settings favorable for AF and HS, are as follows: 1) marginal areas of discharge of the groundwaters of the 2nd hydrogeological story (H-story), 2) zones of topography-controlled upward cir-culation within the internal basin area (at the 1st and, in places, at the 2nd H-stories; 3) crests of anticlinal folds or uplifted tectonic blocs within the internal basin area where the upper regional aquitard is thinned or partially breached; 4) linear-local zones of deep-rooted cross-formational faults conducting AF from internal deep sources across the upper H-stories. Hydrodynamics in the 3rd and 4th stories is dominated by ascending circulation strongly controlled by cross-formational tectonic structures. Specific circula-tion pattern develops in large Cenozoic carbonate platforms (the Florida-type), side-open to the ocean, where AF across stratified sequences in the coastal parts, driven by both topography-induced head gradients and density gradients, involves mixing with the seawater. The latter can be drawn into a platform at deep levels and rise in the plat-form interior (the Kohout’s scheme). In folded regions, AF and HS are tightly con-trolled by faults, especially those at junctions between large tectonic structures. In young intramontaine basins with dominating geostatic regime, HS is favored at margin-al discharge areas where circulation systems of different origins and regimes may inter-act, such as meteoric waters flows from adjacent uplifted massifs, basinal fluids expelled from the basin’s interiors, and endogenous fluids rising along deep-rooted faults. Spe-cific and very favorable settings for HS are found in regions of young volcanism with carbonate formations in a sedimentary cover


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