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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

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That basin is hydrogeographic unit receiving precipitation and discharging runoff in one point [16].?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for magnetostratigraphy (Keyword) returned 20 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 20
Magnetostratigraphy of Sediments in Mammoth Cave, Kentucky, 1982, Schmidt Victor A. ,
Clastic sediment deposits found within the caves of Mammoth Cave National Park have yielded a magnetostratigraphic pattern of magnetic polarity reversals which indicates that they were deposited over a range of at least 1 million and most likely 2 million years

Determination of stream-incision rate in the Appalachian plateaus by using cave-sediment magnetostratigraphy, 1995, Sasowsky Ira D. , White William B. , Schmidt Victor A. ,
Paleomagnetic dating of clastic fluvial sediments contained in caves within the walls of a steeply incised gorge allowed calculation of a maximum incision rate for the East Fork Obey River. The maximum incision rate for this major stream on the western margin of the Cumberland Plateau, north-central Tennessee, was found to be 0.06 m/ka. This rate was determined on the basis of the paleohydraulic relation between the caves and the surface stream, the presence of a normal-to-reverse polarity transition in clastic fluvial sediments deposited within the caves, and the vertical distribution of polarity found in sediments throughout the gorge. The dating results indicate that this highly developed fluviokarst, containing several of the longest known caves in the United States, developed wholly within the Pleistocene and Holocene

Magnetostratigraphy of Cueva del Aleman, Isla de Mona, Puerto Rico and the Species Duration of Audubons shearwater, 1998, Panuska, B. C. , Mylroie, J. M. , Armentrout, D. , Mcfarlane, D.
Magnetostratigraphic analysis of deposits exposed in Cueva del Aleman shows two reversed and two normal chronozones. The lower normal polarity event is observed in a clastic dike and probably predates initial cave formation. Sediments deposited inside the cave proper show a R-N-R sequence and probably date to at least 1.8 Ma. A fossiliferous clastic dike contains normal polarity with an overlying reversed magnetozone. Audubons Shearwater (bird) bones occur in the dike, which is tentatively correlated with the lower N polarity zone predating cave formation. If this correlation is correct, the Audubons Shearwater (Puffinus lherminieri) range can be extended back to at least 1.8 Ma, the Olduvai subchron

Palaeomagnetic research of cave sediments in SW Slovenia, 1998, Bosá, K Pavel, Pruner Petr, Zupan Hajna Nadja

Three profiles of caves sediments (Divača fossil cave, Divaška Jama and Trhlovca Cave) were studied in the Kras near Divača village. Mineralogical study proved relatively uniform mineral composition of the light fraction indicating the main source from weathered sediments of Eocene flysch. Some minerals are derived from weathering profiles and crusts (e.g. gibbsite). Detailed magnetostratigraphic investigations of three profiles defined normal and reverse polarity magnetozones and shows the correlation between the profiles in the Divaška Jama and Trhlovca Cave. The narrow normal magnetozones probably correlate with the Jaramillo polarity event (0.90 to 0.97 Ma) of the Matuyama epoch. Those data indicate the substantial age of cave in which the last phase of filling started before 0.97 Ma and finished before the Brunhes/Matuyama boundary, i.e. around 0.73 Ma. Magnetostratigraphic data of the Divača profile detected two narrow normal magnetozones in the long reverse polarity zone which probably correlate with Olduvai and Reunion polarity events (about 1.67 to 1.87 Ma) of reverse Matuyama epoch or with some of normal magnetozones (about 3.8 to 5.0 Ma) within reverse Gilbert epoch. Data indicate the possibility that the cave was originated during the Messinian period characteristic by sea-level fall and evolution of deep karst in the Mediterranean Basin.


The Makapansgat Australopithecine site from a speleological perspective, 1999, Latham Alf G. , Herries Andrew, Quinney Patrick, Sinclair Anthony, Kuykendall Kevin,
Remains of Australopithecus africanus from the Limeworks Cave, Makapansgat, South Africa, are believed to belong mainly to a metre-thick, bone-rich, speleothem layer. The flowstone is one stratum among a sequence of speleothems, muds, silts, sands and fine and coarse breccias, the study of which has evoked some disagreement. The limeworkers' excavations revealed some stratigraphic relationships but they have obscured others. Partly because of this, controversy surrounds the supposition about whether there are separated depositional basins within the overall site and, if so, whether strata can be securely correlated. This is important because a reconstruction of an overall stratigraphic sequence was used as a basis for a magnetostratigraphic reversal record and by which the site has been tentatively dated. There is qualification and disagreement about the origin of the various flowstones and the actual depositional environment of the muds and silts. Evidence is presented which rules out some previous interpretations. From the point of view of the Australopithecine fossils themselves, it can be said that the calcite matrix in which they were provenanced was a low-energy environment and that the dense bone accumulation of this layer almost certainly did not arise by the action of floods, as previously supposed. The most likely main cause of the dense accumulation was hyena denning activity. It is clear that further work is needed to see how a reliable overall sequence can be established and that closer sampling is required for magnetostratigraphy

Cave fill in the Črnotiče Quarry, SW Slovenia: palaeomagnetic, mineralogical and geochemical study, 1999, Bosá, K Pavel, Mihevc Andrej, Pruner Petr, Melka Karel, Venhodová, Daniela, Langrová, Anna

A fossil cave, filled with cave sediments was open in the Črnotiče Quarry. An about 1.75 m high section was analysed. Profile consists of banded carbonate rocks intercalated by red clays which was deposited on corroded/eroded surface of older speleothems. Banded and laminated carbonate rocks are composed of recrystallized calcilutite resemble freshwater limestones. Characteristics of lamination could indicate its origin from organic-rich films. Red clays are composed of quartz, smectite, vermiculite, gibbsite, pM kaolinite, goethite, anatase, rutile, haematite, calcite, micas and feldspar. They contain pellets with Mn hydroxyoxides. That red clays are weathering products redeposited in water-saturated environment. Samples are characterised by intermediate up to high magnetic values of Jn which is caused by the presence of high amount of Fe-minerals. Mean palaeomagnetic directions are for the group of normal palaeomagnetic polarity equal to D = 10.6°; I = 55.0°, and for the group of reverse polarity than D = 173.0°; I = -31.3°. The top part of the profile shows reverse palaeomagnetic direction interrupted by two normal magnetised zones. According to the arrangement of individual magnetozones we assume, that the top of the highest normal polarised magnetozone could be correlated with the Olduvai event (1.76/1.79 Ma) as the youngest possibility, and therefore the rest of profile must be older.


Palaeomagnetic Research of a Fossil Cave in the Highway Construction at Kozina, SW Slovenia, 2000, Bosá, K Pavel, Knez Martin, Otrubová, Dana, Pruner Petr, Slabe Tadej, Venhodová, Daniela

A fossil channel was filled by sandy sediments of light brown to ochreous color with dynamic structures and textures (lower sequence) unconformably overlain by remains of collapsed roof with brown and ochreous matrix (upper sequence). The sedimentary profile was about 5 m high. In all 38 samples taken from the profile, only one was cemented. Samples were demagnetised by alternating field (AF) at 10 to 1,000 Oe. The cemented one was demagnetised by gradual thermal process from 80 to 560 °C in the MAVACS apparatus. Detected remanent magnetisation in a natural state varied between 95 and 36,470 pT, values of volume magnetic susceptibility are from 55 to 998 x 10-6 SI. Rocks showed low or medium magnetisation. Normal and inverse polarization was detected after demagnetisation. The primary component of magnetisation and resulting polarity could not be stated in samples with expressive viscose component (up to 90 %). According to arrangement of individual magnetozone, it can be stated that sediments are older than the top of Olduvai chron (1.77 Ma), as the magnetostratigraphic profile at Kozina terminated by reverse polarised magnetozone and contains two normal polarised zones. The profile can be correlated with the Divača profile, not only from the palaeomagnetic point of view, but also from a lithological point of view. We suppose, as in Divača, that the cave is a result of the Messinian speleogenetic epoch and its fossilization was connected with rapid base level uplift after refilling of the Mediterranean basin by water. If this hypothesis is close to reality, the fossilization process can be dated from about 5.2 Ma up.


Fluvial incision rates derived from magnetostratigraphy of cave sediments in the cratonic area of eastern Brazil, 2002, Auler A. S. , Smart P. L. , Tarling D. H. , Farrant A. R.

High-resolution magnetostratigraphy of speleothems from Snežna jama, Kamnik-Savinja Alps, Slovenia, 2002, Bosá, K Pavel, Hercman Helena, Mihevc Andrej, Pruner Petr

The Snežna jama Cave is located in the Kamnik-Savinja Alps, NE Slovenia, in a Raduha Ridge. The cave is a huge, more or less horizontal fossil phreatic/epiphreatic conduit. It is penetrated by vertical shafts - invasion vadose (proglacial) caves. Close to the cave entrance, there is about 3 m high wall composed of speleothems - a complex sequence of flowstone with numerous breaks in deposition, six of them are principal. The lower part of the profile (about 85 cm) contains abundant terrigenous component (terra rossa-derived clay). Stalagmites developed in several periods are completely buried by nearly horizontal younger sequences of flowstone. Continuous speleothem log was recovered from the profile in a total length of about 2.4 m. The rock column was cut to cubes in the laboratory (2x2x2 cm) and studied both by thermal demagnetisation (23 samples, 12 steps - 20 to 620 °C) and alternating field method (98 samples, 14 steps - 1 to 100 mT). Magnetic properties identified the lithological boundary. In contrast to the upper part, the lower one shows both higher magnetic susceptibility and higher remanent magnetisation. The turn point can indicate important palaeogeographical change. Magnetostratigraphic log is composed of 7 normal and 6 reverse polarised magnetozones. The age of speleothems detected by the U-series alpha-counting spectrometry falls outside the method range, i.e. over 350 ka. Uranium isotopic equilibria indicate the age over 1.2 Ma. The age of the fill is pre-Quaternary, clearly older than 1.77 Ma. The most probable age from correlation with geomagnetic polarity timescales is about 3.0 to 5.0 or 1.8 to 3.6 Ma. Both possibilities can indicate the growth rate of speleothems of about 1.1 to 1.3 m per 1 Ma. The age of speleogenesis can be compared to some of unroofed caves in the area of the Classical Karst (SW Slovenia) connected with the Messinian period. Snežna jama was uplifted to high altitudes by younger (Plio-Pleistocene) uplift of the Alpine chain.


Magnetostratigraphy of Cave Sediments: Application and Limits, 2003, Bosak Pavel, Pruner Petr, Kadlec Jaroslav


The Great Barrier Reef: The Chronological Record from a New Borehole, 2004, Braithwaite Cjr, Dalmasso H, Gilmour M, Harkness Dd, Henderson Gm, Kay Rl, Kroon D, Montaggioni Lf, Wilson Pa,
A new borehole, 210 mbsf (meters below sea floor) deep, drilled in Ribbon Reef 5 on the Great Barrier Reef off Cooktown, NE Australia, reveals a shallowing-upwards succession, the younger part of which is punctuated by a series of erosion surfaces. Nine depositional units have been defined by lithological changes and are numbered sequentially from the base of the hole upwards. Aminostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy, radiocarbon dating, uranium series dating, and modeling together with strontium ratios have been applied in an attempt to establish a chronology of accumulation. Carbonate deposition began about 770 ka ago in a relatively deep-water slope environment and is represented by a series of debris flows. Lithoclasts within these rocks, indicate that older limestones already existed in the area. Subsequent accretion involved the downslope accumulation of grainstones and wackestones, sometimes cross-laminated, characterized by intervals with abundant rhodoliths and scattered, probably reworked, corals. Four units at the base of the hole reflect deposition that probably began during isotope stage 16 and continued through stage 15 from about 770 to about 564 ka. Unit 5 probably extended to stage 11 (about 400 ka), and unit 6 to stage 9 ([~] 330 ka). Typical reefal associations of corals and calcareous algae were established in this area only above depths of about 100 m in the borehole, units 5-4. The succession is apparently unbroken to an erosion surface at 36 mbsf indicating subaerial emergence. The lack of evidence of emergence below this surface reflects progressive accretion or progradation or both. Two younger erosion surfaces define further periods of lowered sea level. Unit 7 is attributed to deposition during isotope stage 7, but erosion during stage 8 resulted in the preservation of only 8 m of unit 7 limestones. Unit 8 is correlated with stage 5 ([~]125 ka), and unit 9 is interpreted as Holocene (post 7,700 ka). The limited thicknesses of units 7, 8, and 9 are considered to reflect erosion. The progressive shallowing brought the depositional surface within the zone exposed during lowstands, and there is no sedimentological evidence that aggradation was restricted by a lack of accommodation

Speleology and magnetobiostratigraphic chronology of the Buffalo Cave fossil site, Makapansgat, South Africa, 2004, Herries Andy I. R. , Reed Kaye E. , Kuykendall Kevin L. , Latham Alf G. ,
Speleological, stratigraphic, paleomagnetic and faunal data is presented for the Buffalo Cave fossil site in the Limpopo Province of South Africa. Speleothems and clastic deposits were sampled for paleomagnetic and mineral magnetic analysis from the northern part of the site, where stratigraphic relationships could be more easily defined and a magnetostratigraphy could therefore be developed for the site. This is also where excavations recovered the fossil material described. A comparison of the east and South African first and last appearance data with the Buffalo Cave fauna was then used to constrain the magnetostratigraphy to produce a more secure age for the site. The magnetostratigraphy showed a change from normal to reversed polarity in the basal speleothems followed by a short normal polarity period in the base of the clastic deposits and a slow change to reversed directions for the remainder of the sequence. The biochronology suggested an optimal age range of between 1.0[no-break space]Ma and 600,000[no-break space]yr based on faunal correlation with eastern and southern Africa. A comparison of the magnetobiostratigraphy with the GPTS suggests that the sequence covers the time period from the Olduvai event between 1.95 and 1.78[no-break space]Ma, through the Jaramillo event at 1.07[no-break space]Ma to 990,000[no-break space]yr, until the Bruhnes-Matuyama boundary at 780,000[no-break space]yr. The faunal-bearing clastic deposits are thus dated between 1.07[no-break space]Ma and 780,000[no-break space]yr with the main faunal remains occurring in sediments dated to just after the end of the Jaramillo Event at 990,000[no-break space]yr

Geomorphological evolution of the Podgorski Karst, SW Slovenia: contribution of magnetostratigraphic research of the Črnotiče II site with Marifugia sp., 2004, Bosá, K Pavel, Mihevc Andrej, Pruner Petr

The sequence of interior cave facies 9 m high is composed of cyclically arranged fluvial sediments (conglomerates, sands, silts, clays) in the lower part and by laminated to banded silts to clays in the upper part. Both parts are separated by pronounced unconformity associated with deep erosion of the lower part of the profile and tectonic tilting. The fill is covered by chaotic flowstone boulder breccia with red loamy matrix. One segment of the cavity wall was covered by tiny tubes of polychates worms comparable to recent fresh-water Marifugia cavatica. Both profiles show normal magnetozone with only one narrow reverse excursion in each. The correlation of the obtained magnetostratigraphy log can indicate the Gauss chron (ca 2.5 to 3.6 Ma) or the other long normal chron. Črnotiče II site was filled in a substantially short time. Gemorphological evolution of the Podgorski karst plateau (Classical Karst, Karst Edge) since Miocene underwent complicated development with distinct phases of repeating phreatic speleogenesis (horizontal caves), vadose evolution (drawdown shafts), filling, fossilisation, exhumation, block tilting and rotation, uplift and planation.


Changing perspectives in the concept of 'Lago-Mare' in Mediterranean Late Miocene evolution, 2006, Orszagsperber Fabienne,
The Cenozoic Alpine orogeny caused the partition of Tethys into several basins. During the Late Neogene, the Mediterranean attained its final configuration, whereas, eastwards, the Paratethys, isolated from the World Ocean, disintegrated progressively into a series of smaller basins. As a result, an endemic fauna developed in these basins, mainly composed of brackish to freshwater faunas, indicating an environment affected by changes in water salinity. These small basins of the Paratethys were named 'Sea-Lakes' by Andrusov [Andrusov, D., 1890. Les Dreissenidae fossiles et actuelles d'Eurasie. Geol. min. 25, 1-683 (in Russian)]. Subsequently this name was translated into 'Lac-Mer' [Gignoux, M., 1936. Geologie stratigraphique, 2[deg]edition, Masson, Paris].In the Mediterranean isolated from the Atlantic at the end of the Miocene (Messinian), thick evaporites deposited, consisting of a marine Lower Evaporite unit and an Upper Evaporite unit, mainly of continental origin. Ruggieri [Ruggieri, G., 1962. La serie marine pliocenica e quaternaria della Val Marecchia. Atti Acad. Sci. Lett. Arti. Palermo, 19, 1-169.] used the term 'Lago-Mare', to characterize the brackish to fresh water environment which occurred within the Mediterranean at the end of the Messinian.During recent decades, numerous scientific investigations concerning the history of the Messinian within the Mediterranean were devoted to the understanding of conditions prevailing after the deposition of the marine evaporites. Brackish to freshwater faunas are found in several outcrops and boreholes in the Mediterranean, both in the uppermost beds of gypsum and inter-bedded within the clastic sediments of the Upper Evaporite Unit, immediately preceeding the flooding by the marine Pliocene waters. These faunas, because of their similarities with the fauna described in the Paratethys, were named 'Paratethyan', or 'Caspi-brackish' fauna, this leading some authors to imply a migration of these fauna from Paratethys to the Mediterranean. However, others refute this hypothesis.New data induced some researchers to consider that exchanges existed between the Mediterranean and the Eastern Paratethys and also between the Mediterranean and the Atlantic Ocean at the Miocene-Pliocene transition. These investigations now take advantage of the accurate time scales established by authors (biostratigraphy, cyclostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy), allowing good stratigraphic correlations between the Mediterranean and the Paratethys, and precisions on the geodynamic evolution of this area.Furthermore, sediments at the base of the Zanclean (MPl1), locally containing brackish to fresh water faunas conducted authors to attribute this formation to an infra- or pre-Pliocene and also to a Lago-Mare 'event'.Thus, the 'Lago-Mare' concept drifted from its original meaning, and is evolving because of progresses in the understanding of the Mediterranean geodynamics and the adjacent areas during the Miocene-Pliocene transition

Benchmark Papers in Karst Science, 2007,
A collection of benchmark papers in karst science: The Decade 1971 ? 1980 13. The Geochemistry of Some Carbonate Ground Waters in Central Pennsylvania, D. Langmuir 14. Genetic Interpretation of Regressive Evolutionary Processes: Studies on Hybrid Eyes of Two Astyanax Cave Populations (Characidae, Pisces), H. Wilkins 15. Cavernicoles in Lava Tubes on the Island of Hawaii, F.G. Howarth 16. Evolutionary Genetics of Cave-Dwelling Fishes of the Genus Astyanax, J.C. Avise and R.L. Selander 17. Deducing Flow Velocity in Cave Conduits from Scallops, R.L. Curl 18. The Origin of Maze Caves, A.N. Palmer 19. Foraging by Cave Beetles: Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneity of Prey, T.C. Kane and T.L. Poulson 20. Considerations of the Karst Ecosystem, R. Rouch 21. Diffuse Flow and Conduit Flow in Limestone Terrain in the Mendip Hills, Somerset (Great Britain), T.C. Atkinson 22. The Development of Limestone Cave Systems in Dimensions of Length and Depth, D.C. Ford and R.O. Ewers The Decade 1981 ? 1990 23. Magnetostratigraphy of Sediments in Mammoth Cave, Kentucky, V.A. Schmidt 24. Uranium-Series Ages of Speleothem from Northwest England: Correlations with Quaternary Climate, M. Gascoyne, D.C. Ford and H.P. Schwarcz 25. Analysis and Interpretation of Data from Tracer Tests in Karst Areas, W.K. Jones 26. Evolution of Adult Morphology and Life-History Characters in Cavernicolous Ptomaphagus Beetles, S.B. Peck 27. Ecology of the Mixohaline Hypogean Fauna along the Yugoslav Coasts, B. Sket 28. Fractal Dimensions and Geometries of Caves, R.L. Curl 29. Regional Scale Transport in a Karst Aquifer. 1. Component Separation of Spring Flow Hydrographs, S.J. Dreiss 30. Morphological Evolution of the Amphipod Gammarus minus in Caves: Quantitative Genetic Analysis, D.W. Fong 31. The Flank Margin Model for Dissolution Cave Development in Carbonate Platforms, J.E. Mylroie and J.L. Carew 32. Sulfuric Acid Speleogenesis of Carlsbad Cavern and Its Relationship to Hydrocarbons, Delaware Basin, New Mexico and Texas, C.A. Hill The Decade 1991 ? 2000 33. Origin and Morphology of Limestone Caves, A.N. Palmer 34. How Many Species of Troglobites Are There? D.C. Culver and J.R. Holsinger 35. Annual Growth Banding in a Cave Stalagmite, A. Baker, P.L. Smart, R.L. Edwards and D.A. Richards 36. Natural Environment Change in Karst: The Quaternary Record, S.-E. Lauritzen 37. Pattern and Process in the Biogeography of Subterranean Amphipods, J.R. Holsinger 38. A Chemoautotrophically Based Cave Ecosystem, S.M. Sarbu, T.C. Kane and B.K. Kinkle 39. Rhodopsin Evolution in the Dark, K.A. Crandall and D.M. Hillis 40. Climate and Vegetation History of the Midcontinent from 75 to 25 ka: A Speleothem Record from Crevice Cave, Missouri, USA, J.A. Dorale, R.L. Edwards, E. Ito and L.A. González

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