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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That traverse is 1. the commonest form of cave survey in which direction, distance and vertical angle between successive points are measured. 2. a way along ledges above the floor of a cave. 3. to move along such a way [25].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for mollusca (Keyword) returned 14 results for the whole karstbase:
Amino acid geochronology: integrity of the carbonate matrix and potential of molluscan fossils, 1980, Miller G. H.

Climatostratigraphic scheme of the Black Sea pleistocene and its correlation with the oxygen-isotope scale and glacial events, 1988, Zubakov V. A. ,
New evidence from the Asov Sea-Black Sea region shows that after the Cobb Mountain magnetic event (1.1 myr) there were 8 saline water events, with Mediterranean molluscs penetrating into the Asov Sea (five times farther than the western Manych Strait), and 7 or 10 cold freshwater events. During the freshening phase, the Caspian Sea molluscan fauna penetrated into the Black Sea; each time the Caspian mollusc assemblage was characterized by a new species of Didacna. Thus, some 18-20 bioclimatostratigraphic units can be distinguished in the Asov Sea-Black Sea section for the last 1 myr. Their numerical age is estimated by some dozen thermoluminescence dates and 12 magnetic-polarity datum planes. The Karangatian s. lato corresponds to the interval 300,000-50,000 yr, the Uzunlarian to 580,000-300,000 yr, and the Chaudian to 1,100,000-600,000 yr. The Karangatian and Tyrrhenian marine terraces correspond to marine isotope stages 5 and 7, the Uzunlarian and Milazzian to stages 11-15, and the Chaudian and Sicilian to stages 16-28. The number and ages of glacial-interglacial cycles in continental Europe are identical to the climatic cycles in the Black Sea and Mediterranean

TRAVERTINES - CARBONATE ACCUMULATIONS CONNECTED TO KARST SYSTEMS, SEDIMENTARY SEQUENCES AND QUATERNARY PALEOENVIRONMENTS, 1991, Magnin F. , Guendon J. L. , Vaudour J. , Martin P. ,
In the valleys of southeastern France, below karst massifs, river deposits with travertines show vertical sedimentary sequences always similar, with, from bottom to top: gravels, silts, chalks, travertines s.s. (stromatolitic encrustations with laminated facies), travertinous sand, silts. The study of flora and fauna fossilized by these formations shows a good correlation between the maximum of carbonate deposition (travertinous facies s.s.) and the optimum of vegetation development (forest). And finally, behind calcareous dams edified by travertine, paludal and lacustrine fields are environments developed trapping diversified sediments (clays, peats, silts,...). Then, dam and lake are forming a unit that we can call a 'travertine system'

Mollusca (Gastropoda) von der Schwabenreithhhle bei Lunz (Niedersterreich)., 1992, Frank, C(hrista).
[(1823/32)]

Mollusca (Gastropoda) von der Schwabenreithhhle bei Lunz (Niedersterreich), 1992, Frank, C.

Mollusca aus der Groen Badlhhle bei Peggau (Steiermark)., 1993, Frank, Ch.
[(2836/17)]

Mollusca aus der Groen Badlhhle bei Peggau (Steiermark), 1993, Frank, Ch.

New Faunal and Fungal Records from Caves in Georgia, USA, 2000, Reeves, W. K. , Jensen, J. B. , Ozier, J. C.
Records for 173 cavernicolous invertebrate species of Platyhelminthes, Nematoda, Nemertea, Annelida, Mollusca, and Arthropoda from 47 caves in Georgia are presented. The checklist includes eight species of cave-dwelling cellular slime molds and endosymbiotic trichomycete fungi associated with cave millipedes and isopods.

Characteristics of karst ecosystems of Vietnam and their vulnerability to human impact, 2001, Tuyet D. ,
Karst in Vietnam covers an area of about 60,000 km(2), i.e. 18 % of the surface of the country. The country has an annual average temperature of 24 degreesC, an annual average rainfall of 2300 nun and a relative humidity of about 90%. Karst in Vietnam is typified by peak cluster-depression landscapes ranging in elevation from 200 to over 2000 m. Tower and coastal karst landscapes also exit. Because of naturally favourable conditions, karst ecosystems are diverse and very rich. Higher plants(cormophytes) are abundant. They are represented by approximately 2000 species, 908 genera, 224 families, 86 orders and 7 phyla. They form a thick vegetation cover of evergreen tropical rainforest. Knowledge about lower plants is limited. The fauna is rich and diverse. Phyla such as Protozoa, Vermes, Mollusca and Arthropoda are yet ill known. Preliminary results show that the phylum Chordata is represented by 541 species from 80 families, 40 orders and 5 classes. There exist many precious and rare mammals, in particular some endemic species such as Trachypithecus poliocephalus, T. delacouri, Rhinopithecus avanculus, Rhinolophus rouxi, Seotoma dineties and Silurus cuephuongensis. The class Insecta has about 2000 species. The fast population growth, particularly in the mountainous areas of the country, triggers an increasing demand for land and therefore threatens the ecosystem. To obtain land for farming, people have cut, burned and destroyed natural forest cover; resulting in occurrence of hazards such as soil-loss, water-loss, flash floods, mud-rock flows, rock-falls, severe drought, water logging and changes of karstic aquifers etc. Poaching precious animals and illegal logging are increasing. In contrast to other natural systems, karst ecosystems cannot be reestablished once damaged. Living karst landscapes will become rocky desert ones without life. Conservation of karstic environmental systems in general and karstic ecosystems in particular should not be the sole vocation of scientists but also a duty and responsibility of authorities and people from all levels. A good example of a multidisciplinary approach to karst-related problems is the implementation of the Vietnamese-Belgian Karst Project (VBEKAP): 'Rural development in the mountain karst area of NW Vietnam by sustainable water and land management and social learning: its conditions and facilitation'. The aim of this project is to improve living conditions of local people and sustained protection and management of the karst environment and ecosystem

Molluscan assemblages from deposits filling small karst forms in the Tatra Mountains (Southern Poland), 2001, Alexandrowicz, Witold Pawel

Numerous shells of molluscs were found in loamy sediments rich in limestone and dolomite scree filling small karst forms and forming debris fans. They have been analysed from several logs in the Tatra Mountains. Woodland and open-country snails are the main components of fauna. Relations between two mentioned ecological groups of molluscs indicate climatic changes and moving the timberline. Three phases of warming separated by two stages of the colder climate were recognised. They can be related to following ages: XIII and first half of XIV centuries AD (warm phase), second half of XIV - XVII centuries AD (cold phase), XVIII and the first half of XIX centuries (warm phase), second half of the XIX century (cold phase) and finally to XX century (warm phase).


Early British reports of aquatic mollusca living in underground water pipes, 2003, Moseley Max

Les mollusques souterrains du rseau karstique de Padirac (Lot, France) et micro-rpartition de Bythinella padiraci Locard, 1903 (Mollusca, Caenogastropoda, Rissooidea), 2004, Bichain Jeanmichel, Boudsocq Christian, Pri Vincent
Subterranean molluscs of the karstic network of Padirac (France, Lot) and micro-distribution of Bythinella padiraci Locard, 1903 (Mollusca, Caenogastropoda, Rissooidea) - During a Padirac expedition in November 2003, about ten biological samplings were carried out in the deep karstic network. The first aim of this biospeological mission was to update the data on stygobites molluscs in this subterranean ecosystem. The results show that Bythinella padiraci Locard, 1903, species listed as vulnerable in the 2004 IUCN world Red List of threatened animals, although absent in the upstream part of the Padirac subterranean river, is present in its downstream part after the Dversoir and in the De Joly affluent. An hydrobioid belonging to the genus Islamia was recorded as a component of the stygobiontic biocenose of Padirac as well as Moitessieria rolandiana Bourguignat, 1863. In addition, 3 epigean freshwaters molluscs were observed alive in the deep network, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, Ancylus fluviatilis, Pisidium sp. as well as a terrestrial mollusc, Discus rotundatus.

Mollusca, 2004, Bernasconi R.

Paratethyan-Mediterranean connectivity in the Sea of Marmara region (NW Turkey) during the Messinian, 2006, Cagatay Mn, Gorur N, Flecker R, Sakinc M, Tunoglu C, Ellam R, Krijgsman W, Vincent S, Dikbas A,
The Sea of Marmara region is thought to have been a gateway between Paratethys and the Mediterranean since the Middle Miocene, and is therefore an important control on water mass exchange between the two realms. The Miocene successions in the northeastern Aegean and northwestern Marmara regions indicate that the first Mediterranean marine transgression to affect these areas occurred during the late Serravallian.In the northeastern Aegean region, frequent marine incursions occurred during the Tortonian and Messinian stages. The Messinian stage in this area is represented by a package of brackish- to fresh-water carbonates with some marine sandstone-siltstone interbeds (Alcitepe Formation), which conformably overlies the Tortonian Kirazli Formation. The Messinian sequence is overlain with an erosional contact by a shallow marine siliciclastic sequence (Goztepe Formation) of Zanclean age. With its brackish- to fresh-water carbonates and broadly constrained age, the Messinian sequence is interpreted as being coeval with the Upper Evaporite-Lago Mare sequence observed in western Mediterranean basins.In the western Marmara region, the Pontian (Messinian) Alcitepe Formation consists of bioclastic and oolitic limestones with basal clastic rocks. It conformably overlies the fluvio-lacustrine siliciclastic sediments of the Middle to Upper Miocene Kirazli Formation and is overlain by fluvio-lacustrine sediments of the Kimmerian (5.5-3.2[no-break space]Ma) Truva and Tevfikiye formations with an erosional contact.The bioclastic limestones of the Alcitepe Formation in the western Marmara region contain a molluscan and ostracod fauna that are endemic to Paratethys. These fauna indicate deposition in a shallow, brackish- to fresh-water environment. Faunal and paleomagnetic analyses of a section of the Alcitepe Formation at Yenimahalle (Canakkale) confirm that the formation is of Pontian age and represents chron C3r (6.04-5.24[no-break space]Ma). The ostracod analysis indicates that during deposition of the Alcitepe Formation, salinity increased from brackish in the lower part to more saline conditions in the upper part. Ostracod valves have low 87Sr / 86Sr values relative to coeval Late Miocene ocean water. This indicates that exchange between the Sea of Marmara region and the global ocean was restricted throughout this period. Fossil and Sr-isotope evidence suggests, however, that there was a Paratethyan-Marmara connection during the deposition of the lower part of the Alcitepe Formation, with Paratethyan influence reaching the north Aegean. Connection via Marmara between Paratethys and the Mediterranean was not re-established until the late Aktchagylian (Late Pliocene). The re-connection was caused by both increased activity on the North Anatolian Fault and global sea level rise

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