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Enviroscan Ukrainian Institute of Speleology and Karstology

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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That Rillenkarren is (german.) solution flutes that occur only in places where fresh unspent precipitation is active and end where the water attains too high a content of lime or where water is added. their length increases with slope, temperature, and rainfall; eventually reaching 1 m and more in the tropics, up to 50 cm, and as an exception, 100 cm in the alps. their width extends from 1 to 3 cm. they lie together in rows with no space between, with sharp intermediary ridges of no more than 1 cm in height. they increase at all freely exposed peaks and ridges where fresh rainwater alone is at work. the grooves gradually flatten out to a smooth surface. their theory of origin is unknown. [3]. synonyms: (german.) kannelierungen; solution flutes; and firstkarren.?

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for mrs (Keyword) returned 2 results for the whole karstbase:
Localization of saturated karst aquifer with magnetic resonance sounding and resistivity imagery, 2003, Vouillamoz J. M. , Legchenko A. , Albouy Y. , Bakalowicz M. , Baltassat J. M. , Alfares W. ,
To answer one of the main questions of hydrogeologists implementing boreholes or working on pollution questions in a karst environment-i.e., where is the ground water?-numerous tools including geophysics are used. However, the contribution of geophysics differs from one method to the other. The magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) method has the advantage of direct detection of ground water over other geophysical methods. Eight MRSs were implemented over a known karst conduit explored and mapped by speleologists to estimate the MRS ability to localize ground water. Two direct current resistivity imageries (DC-2D imagery) were also implemented to check their capability to map a known cave. We found that the MRS is a useful tool to locate ground water in karst as soon as the quantity of water is enough to be detected. The threshold quantity is a function of depth and it was estimated by forward modeling to propose a support graph to hydrogeologists. The measured MRS's signals could be used to calculate transmissivity and permeability estimators. These estimators were used to map and to draw a cross section of the case study site, which underline accurately the known karst conduit location and depth. We also found that the DC-2D imagery could underline the karst structures: It was able to detect the known cave through its associated faults. We prepared a computer simulation to check the depth of such a cave to induce resistivity anomaly which could be measured in similar conditions

Using 2D inversion of magnetic resonance soundings to locate a water-filled karst conduit, 2006, Boucher M, Girard Jf, Legchenko A, Baltassat Jm, Dorfliger N, Chalikakis K,
SummaryA new methodology for magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) data acquisition and interpretation was developed for locating water-filled karst cavities. This methodology was used to investigate the Ouysse karst system in the Poumeyssens shaft in the Causse de Gramat (France). A new 2D numerical MRS response model was designed for improved accuracy over the previous 1D MRS approach. A special survey performed by cave divers confirmed the accuracy of the MRS results. Field results demonstrated that in favourable conditions (a low EM noise environment and a relatively shallow, large target) the MRS method, used with a coincident transmitter/receiver loop, can be an effective tool for locating a water-filled karst conduit. It was shown numerically that because an a priori orientation of the MRS profile with the karst conduit is used in the inversion scheme (perpendicular for instance), any error in this assumption introduces an additional error in locating the karst. However, the resulting error is within acceptable limits when the deviation is less than 30[deg]. The MRS results were compared with an electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) survey. It was found that in Poumeyssens, ERT is not able to locate the water-filled karst. On the other hand, ERT provides additional information about heterogeneities in the limestone

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