MWH Global

Enviroscan Ukrainian Institute of Speleology and Karstology

Community news

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That viscosity is 1. the resistance of liquid to flow [16]. 2. the property of a real fluid creating shear forces between two fluid elements and giving rise to fluid friction [16]. specifically, it is the ratio of the shear stress to the rate of shear strain [6].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

What is Karstbase?

Search KARSTBASE:

keyword
author

Browse Speleogenesis Issues:

KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
See all featured articles from other geoscience journals

Search in KarstBase

Your search for pollutants (Keyword) returned 22 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 22
The behavior of hydrophobic, organic micropollutants in different Karst water systems, 1987, Simmleit N. , Herrmann R. ,

POLLUTION OF LIMESTONE AQUIFER DUE TO URBAN WASTE-DISPOSAL AROUND RAIPUR, MADHYA-PRADESH, INDIA, 1994, Bodhankar N, Chatterjee B,
During the rainy season deterioration in the quality of water, supplied through dug wells and tube wells, near an abandoned limestone quarry was reported. The abandoned quarry is now being used as an urban waste disposal site. The problem was further complicated by hospitalization of several inhabitants who were using this water for domestic purposes. Looking into the consequences, chemical analysis of water from the quarry, dug wells and tube wells was carried out. The water was found to be contaminated. The transportation of pollutants from the quarry to the groundwater system was facilitated by karst features. Furthermore, four major sources domestic waste disposal, water conservation structures, landfills, and water wells contributing to pollution were identified. This case study is an attempt to provide an understanding of how the karst features facilitate groundwater contamination. It will help us answer a few questions such as why karst hydrogeology deserves special attention in urban expansion and what protective measures should be planned in view of rapid urbanization

An examination of short-term variations in water quality at a karst spring in Kentucky, 1996, Ryan M. , Meiman J. ,
Water quality at many karst springs undergoes very high amplitude but relatively brief degradation following influxes of runoff. Accurately recording transient variations requires more rigorous sampling strategies than traditional methods, A pilot study to determine the usefulness of high-frequency, flow-dependent sampling strategies, combined with coincidental quantitative dye tracer tests, was implemented in the Big Spring Ground-Water Basin in Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky. Data recorded following two separate runoff events showed that the concentrations of two nonpoint source pollutants, fecal coliform bacteria and suspended sediment, greatly exceeded prerunoff event values for very short periods of time, A phreatic conduit segment, calculated at 17 million liters in volume, instantaneously propagated head changes, caused by direct runoff entering the aquifer, from the ground-water inputs to Big Spring, A significant delay between the initial increases in discharge and the arrival of direct runoff, as indicated by a steady decrease in specific conductance, represented the time required to displace this volume of phreatic water, The delay showed that sampling a karst spring only during peak discharge would be an unreliable sampling method. Runoff from two different subcatchments was tagged with tracer dye and the timing of the passage of the resultant dye clouds through Big Spring were compared to water quality variations, Distinct lag times between the arrival of direct runoff at Big Spring and the bacteria and suspended sediment waveforms were shown through the concurrent quantitative tracer tests to be related to the areal distribution of land-cover type within the basin

The hydrogeological effect of quarrying karstified limestone: options for prediction and mitigation, 1998, Hobbs S. L. , Gunn J. ,
The hydrogeological effect of limestone extraction from open pits (quarries) depends on the location of the site in the landscape, the vertical and horizontal extent of the excavation, the methods used to excavate the stone, and the extent of karstification. Groundwater quality is commonly affected by quarrying through increased fine sediment concentrations and accidental spillages. Removal of any soil cover allows direct access for pollutants into the aquifer, a problem which may be exacerbated by licensed or illegal tipping of waste following cessation of stone extraction. Quarrying also removes the entire subcutaneous (epikarstic) zone which is an important ground-water store, together with part or all of the unsaturated zone. Pumping of water from the excavation will change the ground-water balance and can alter the direction and amounts of conduit flow, particularly if the quarry extends beneath the water table. Prediction of such impacts is difficult, especially when the limestone is karstified, such that there will always be a degree of uncertainty associated with the impact of the workings. Hence, it is essential that for new quarries monitoring is undertaken prior to, throughout, and following mineral working, with options for mitigation if mineral working causes an unacceptable impact. When a quarry ceases to be worked, the direct impacts on groundwater quality may rapidly decrease but there are important implications for after-use of the site. Impacts on groundwater quantity are likely to be more long-term

Planning for gypsum geohazards in Lithuania and England, 1999, Paukstys B. , Cooper A. H. , Arustiene J. ,
The rapid underground dissolution of gypsum, and the evolution of the gypsum karst in Lithuania and England, results in subsidence problems which can make construction difficult. The natural dissolution yields sulphate-rich groundwater of poor quality and the karst is susceptible to the rapid transmission of pollutants. In the north of Lithuania gypsum karst is developed in Devonian gypsum. Here the towns of Birai, Pasvalys and the surrounding countryside suffer subsidence and some buildings have been damaged. The majority of the potable water in these areas is derived from groundwater extracted from sandstone sequences that underlie the gypsum. In Lithuania conservation measures have been introduced to control agriculture and prevent pollution of the gypsum karst. These measures include environmentally-friendly farming, restrictions on land use and exclusion zones around subsidence hollows. In England subsidence caused by the dissolution of Permian gypsum has caused severe problems in the vicinity of the town of Ripen. Numerous buildings have been damaged and new sites are difficult to develop. Here formal planning regulations have recently been introduced to help to protect against the worst effects of subsidence resulting from gypsum dissolution. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved

Groundwater in the Celtic regions, 2000, Robins N. S. , Misstear B. D. R. ,
The Celtic regions of Britain and Ireland have a complex and diverse geology which supports a range of regionally and locally important bedrock aquifers and unconsolidated Quaternary aquifers. In bedrock, aquifer units are often small and groundwater flow paths short and largely reliant on fracture flow. Groundwater has fulfilled an important social role throughout history, and is now enjoying renewed interest. Groundwater quality is generally favourable and suitable for drinking with minimal treatment. However, many wells are vulnerable to microbiological and chemical pollutants from point sources such as farmyards and septic tank systems, and nitrate concentrations from diffuse agricultural sources are causing concern in certain areas. Contamination by rising minewaters in abandoned coalfields and in the vicinity of abandoned metal mines is also a problem in some of the Celtic lands

Ecological incidents in Northern Adriatic Karst (Croatia), 2000, Geres D, Rubinic J, Ozanic N,
In spite of growing efforts to preserve the quality of groundwater resources, accidental pollution is becoming increasingly frequent, resulting in long-lasting impact on the groundwater status. The consequences of ecological accidents are particularly expressed in karst regions, which are caused by the geological properties of the area where the groundwater aquifers are situated, as well as by hydrological circumstances which also influence the dynamic mechanisms of water flow and transportation of pollution in the karst environment. The paper stresses the hydrological component of karst aquifer function and the related role of hydrology in assessment of the hazards caused by accidental pollution and, once the accident has happened, in monitoring the situation and forecasting the possible impact on water resources. The analysis of ecological accidents in the karst has been made, based on the actual examples of accidents involving fuel substances recorded in the Northern Adriatic karst area in Croatia in the period from 1990 to 1998. The basic characteristics of the mechanism of water movement in the karst are presented from the hydrological standpoint, as well as the related risk of rapid transportation of pollutants into the parts of the aquifers used for water supply. The paper also contains proposals for possible approaches to protection of particularly valuable water resources in the karat from accidental pollution occurring in road transport

Groundwater pollution by contaminant transport from soil to fractured rock, 2000, Witthü, Ser Kai, Č, Enč, Ur Curk Barbara

Water flow and contaminant transport from soil to underlying fractured rock is mainly controlled by the hydraulic conditions of the soil-bedrock boundary. In respect to the necessary understanding of contaminant transport at the soil-bedrock boundary the identification of flow paths within both the soil cover and the fractured media is decisive on the one side. On the other hand substance-specific behaviour of the often reactive pollutants compared to water flow has to be known in detail. Field scale tracer tests with different tracers (uranine and salts) and a potential pollutant as a reactive tracer (nitrate) were performed at the IRGO field research facility Sinji Vrh (SI). Injection points are located on the surface, in the soil, at the soil-rock interface and in the fractured rock; water is sampled in an underground tunnel with the help of two subhorizontal boreholes equipped with sampling devices and a special construction for collecting water seeping from the ceiling. The goal of these experiments is to identify the flow paths of solutes to the underground tunnel and to estimate their residence time dependent on the injection point. So far only some conclusions regarding the waterflux into the tunnel could be drawn.


Failure of an industrial wastewater lagoon in a karst terrain and remedial action, 2001, Memon B. A. , Azmeh M. M. ,
Failure of a wastewater lagoon, caused by development of a sinkhole underneath the lagoon at a site in the Lehigh River Valley near Allentown, Pennsylvania, allowed waste water to enter into the underlying karstified carbonate aquifer, a source of public water supply in the area. Identification of the contamination and development of an appropriate site-specific remediation plan required understanding of site geology, stratigraphy, hydrogeologic setting and aquifer characteristics. Information on site geology and hydrogeology, including aquifer geometry and matrix, occurrence and flow of groundwater were collected and evaluated. Core holes were drilled, geophysically logged, and correlated to define stratigraphy and structural controls to the movement of groundwater and pollutants. Monitoring wells were installed. Water level data collected on a continuous basis were used to determine the direction and gradient and also correlated with climatic changes to define amplitude of fluctuations of groundwater. Correlation of lithologic logs and interpretation of geophysical logs identified five water-producing zones separated by semi-confined layers within the carbonate aquifer. Water samples were collected from different water producing zones and analyzed to delineate vertical and horizontal extent of contamination. Pentaerythritol (PE), which was directly linked with the failure of lagoon, was identified as a pollutant in groundwater. PE was found to be present in the lower water-producing zones. Based on a geologic and hydrogeologic model of the site and understanding of flow regime and presence of PE in the lower water producing zones, a remedial plan (a pump-and-treat system) was developed and implemented to remediate the aquifer. This remedial action has reduced the PE level in groundwater and also created a pressure trough as a barrier to off-site migration

Palaeowaters in European coastal aquifers -- the goals and main conclusions of the PALAEAUX project, 2001, Edmunds Wm,
The PALAEAUX project has brought together up-to-date geochemical, isotopic and hydrogeological information on coastal groundwaters across Europe in a transect from the Baltic to the Canary Islands. These data have been interpreted in relation to past climatic and environmental conditions, as well as extending and challenging concepts about the evolution of groundwater near the present day coastlines. Groundwater movement beyond the present coastline as well as emplacement on shore to greater depths (up to 500 m) than allowed by the present-day flow regime has occurred, hence offshore freshwater reserves are inferred in some coastal areas. The main attributes of palaeowaters, in terms of water quality, are their high bacterial purity, total mineralization that is often less than that of modern waters and being demonstrably free of anthropogenic chemicals. However, in the Mediterranean coastal areas, lower recharge leads to higher salinity conditions in both palaeo- and modern waters. Freshwater of high quality originating from different climatic conditions to the present day, when the sea level was much lower, is found at depth beneath the present-day coastline in several countries. Recharge is shown to have been more or less continuous during the past 100 ka, even beneath the ice, as demonstrated by groundwaters from Estonia, having {delta}O values of c. -22%o. However, elsewhere (UK and Belgium) an age gap can be recognized indicating that no recharge took place at the time of the last glacial maximum. Devensian recharge temperatures (soil air temperatures) were some 6{degrees}C colder across Europe than at the present day. The development of aquifers in Europe during the past 50-100 a, by abstraction from boreholes, has generally disturbed flow systems that have evolved over varying geological timescales, especially those derived from the Late Pleistocene and Holocene. Hydrogeophysical logging has demonstrated time and quality stratified aquifers resulting in mixed waters being produced on pumping. A range of specific indicators, including 3H, 3H/3He, 85Kr, chlorofluoro-carbons and pollutants, have been used to recognize the extent to which waters from the modern (industrial) era have penetrated into the aquifers, often replacing the natural palaeogroundwaters. In the coastal regions, many problems for management are identified, including issues relating to quantity and quality of water, seasonal demand, pollution risks and ecosystem damage, requiring a new look at legislation

The environmental hazards of locating wastewater impoundments in karst terrain, 2002, Memon B. A. , Azmeh M. M. , Pitts M. W. ,
A wastewater storage lagoon failed due to the development of a sinkhole at a site in the Lehigh River valley in Allentown, Pennsylvania (PA). The polluted wastewater from the lagoon entered into the underlying aquifer and moved within a narrow pathway controlled by cracks, fissures, and solution channels within the karstified Allentown Formation of the Cambrian Period. The Allentown Formation serves as the principal aquifer for the public water supply of the area. To develop appropriate remedial measures, a thorough understanding of the geologic setting was required. Therefore, a geologic and hydrogeologic characterization of the area was completed, aerial photography and satellite imagery interpretations were performed, stratigraphic core holes were drilled and geophysically logged, and the data correlated to define structural control and movement of ground water and pollutants. A number of wells were drilled and constructed, and water levels were monitored on a continuous basis to correlate with climatic changes and determine the direction of flow. Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed to delineate the vertical and lateral extent of migration of pollutants. Five saturated (water-bearing) zones were identified within the bedrock based on the analysis of cores and interpretation of geophysical logs. Ground water in the lower zones is polluted; the concentration of pollution increases with depth. Monitoring stations were established in the creek, south of the site, to measure flow rate several times during different seasons, and at different reaches, to determine the losing and gaining sections of the creek. Pumping tests were conducted to determine hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer. Based on the hydrogeologic model of the karstified aquifer, flow regime and structural control, a plan of action was defined and initiated to remediate the aquifer. The ground water is being remediated using a pump and treat methodology. The cleanup effort is continuous and the pollutant level is fluctuating with an overall-declining trend. The application of this technology has also created a pressure trough, thereby controlling off the site migration of pollutants. (C) 2002 Published by Elsevier Science B.V

The processes dominating Ca dissolution of limestone when exposed to ambient atmospheric conditions as determined by comparing dissolution models, 2002, Cardellfernandez C, Vleugels G, Torfs K, Van Grieken R,
In order to gain a clearer understanding of the decay mechanisms operating in limestones, and to determine the main damage factors at different exposure environments, calcite-dissolution models from the literature were compared. The models recognise three major stone decay mechanisms: attack by air pollutants (dry deposition), dissolution in clean rain (karst effect) and dissolution caused by neutralisation of rain acidity (acidity effect), These models were fitted to experimental data obtained from the run-off water analysis running over the so-called Massangis limestone, exposed under ambient conditions in five sites in Belgium. The models demonstrate that different processes dominate the limestone dissolution at the different sites, with dry deposition of air pollutants (especially SO2) being the principal process involved

Fens in karst sinkholes - Archives for long lasting 'immission' chronologies, 2003, Hettwer K. , Deicke M. , Ruppert H. ,
Fens in karst sinkholes are excellent archives for the reconstruction of vegetation, land use and emission rates over millennia. The reasons are the usually good preservation of pollen, the high portion of low density organic material with very low background concentrations of heavy metals, and the circum-neutral pH-values in most of these mires preventing migration of heavy metals. Immissions of dust and of harmful elements can easily be correlated with changes in vegetation ('immission' is a synonym for the deposition or impact of pollutants from the atmosphere on a receptor surface). One 13 m core from a similar to5000 yr old karst sinkhole fen (Silberhohl, western margin of the Harz Mountains, central Germany) was investigated by geochemical analysis, pollen analysis and dated by C-14 and palynological data. The core consists of organic material with a few percent of CaCO3 precipitated from groundwater and a small amount of atmospheric detritus. As early as the Iron Age (first pre-Christian millennium), slight but significant enrichments of Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd are observed. After 400 AD stronger enrichments occurred culminating in the High Middle Ages (similar to1200-1300 AD). Maximum values are 1250 mug g(-1) Pb, 214 mug g(-1) Cu, 740 mug g(-1) Zn, and 3.8 mug g(-1) Cd. The enrichments are caused by emissions during smelting of sulfidic lead-zinc ores from the adjacent Hercynian deposits to extract Ag and Cu. Except for cadmium, these values were never exceeded in modern times. Since the Iron Age 23 g technogenic Pb, 5.3 g Cu, 27 g Zn and 0.2 g Cd have been deposited per square meter. Palynological investigations show a strong correlation between decreasing red beech pollens (Fagus sylvatica) and increasing demand on wood for smelting in the Middle Ages. Simultaneously, the pollen share of pioneer trees such as birch (Betula pubescens) and of cereal grains (e.g. Secale) increases. Since the beginning of the 14th century, the decline of agriculture and population is reflected in the decreasing contents of Secale and heavy metals in the fen deposits

Stochastic discrete model of karstic networks, 2004, Jaquet O. , Siegel P. , Klubertanz G. , Benabderrhamane H. ,
Karst aquifers are characterised by an extreme spatial heterogeneity that strongly influences their hydraulic behaviour and the transport of pollutants. These aquifers are particularly vulnerable to contamination because of their highly permeable networks of conduits. A stochastic model is proposed for the simulation of the geometry of karstic networks at a regional scale. The model integrates the relevant physical processes governing the formation of karstic networks. The discrete simulation of karstic networks is performed with a modified lattice-gas cellular automaton for a representative description of the karstic aquifer geometry. Consequently, more reliable modelling results can be obtained for the management and the protection of karst aquifers. The stochastic model was applied jointly with groundwater modelling techniques to a regional karst aquifer in France for the purpose of resolving surface pollution issues. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

Identification of localised recharge and conduit flow by combined analysis of hydraulic and physico-chemical spring responses (Urenbrunnen, SW-Germany), 2004, Birk S, Liedl R, Sauter M,
Karst aquifers are highly vulnerable to contamination due to the rapid transport of pollutants in conduit systems. Effective strategies for the management and protection of karst aquifers, therefore, require an adequate hydrogeological characterisation of the conduit systems. In particular, the identification and characterisation of conduits transmitting rapid, localised recharge to springs is of great interest for vulnerability assessments. In this work, it is demonstrated that localised recharge and conduit flow in a karst aquifer (Urenbrunnen catchment, southwest Germany) can be characterised by jointly analysing the hydraulic and physico-chemical responses of a spring to recharge events. Conduit volumes are estimated by evaluating time lags between increases in spring discharge and associated changes in the electrical conductivity and temperature of the discharged water. These estimates are confirmed by the results of a combined tracer and recharge test. Variations in electrical conductivity are also shown to assist in the quantification of the fast recharge component associated with short-term recharge pulses. However, spectral analysis of temperature fluctuations reveals that highly mineralised surface waters locally infiltrate into the aquifer during the winter and spring without causing significant electrical conductivity variations in the spring water. Hence, the most consistent conceptual model is obtained by a combined analysis of both physico-chemical parameters. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

Results 1 to 15 of 22
You probably didn't submit anything to search for