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Enviroscan Ukrainian Institute of Speleology and Karstology


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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That reverse fault is a fault where relative movement of the hanging wall has occurred in the upward direction [16].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms


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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
See all featured articles from other geoscience journals

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Your search for snails (Keyword) returned 10 results for the whole karstbase:
Revisiting the Snails of Skyline Caverns, 1943,
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Morrison, J. P. E.

Land Snails from the Caves of Kentucky, Tennessee and Alabama, 1964,
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Hubricht, Leslie

Lithophagic Snail from Southern British Honduras, 1967,
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Craig Ak,
A freshwater gastropod, Pachycheilus glaphyrus, responsible for unusual erosion in limestone has been located in southern British Honduras where it is abundant in streams flowing through areas of karst topography. These snails ingest algae that proliferate in solution grooves formed at the fluctuating air-water interface. Rasping action of the radula results in deepening of these grooves and appears to improve the algal habitat

Snails from Streams and Pools in Caves at Lisdoonvarna, County Clare, Ireland, 1968,
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Warwick T.

Cocklebiddy Shells, 1995,
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Brown, Rosemary

Five genera of shells were collected from the sediment around Cocklebiddy Cave lake in the Nullarbor Plain (Western Australia). All shells belong to small modern gastropod terrestrial snails.


Molluscan assemblages from deposits filling small karst forms in the Tatra Mountains (Southern Poland), 2001,
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Alexandrowicz, Witold Pawel

Numerous shells of molluscs were found in loamy sediments rich in limestone and dolomite scree filling small karst forms and forming debris fans. They have been analysed from several logs in the Tatra Mountains. Woodland and open-country snails are the main components of fauna. Relations between two mentioned ecological groups of molluscs indicate climatic changes and moving the timberline. Three phases of warming separated by two stages of the colder climate were recognised. They can be related to following ages: XIII and first half of XIV centuries AD (warm phase), second half of XIV - XVII centuries AD (cold phase), XVIII and the first half of XIX centuries (warm phase), second half of the XIX century (cold phase) and finally to XX century (warm phase).


Quaternary calcarenite stratigraphy on Lord Howe Island, southwestern Pacific Ocean and the record of coastal carbonate deposition, 2003,
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Brooke Bp, Woodroffe Cd, Murraywallace Cv, Heijnis H, Jones Bg,
Lord Howe Island is a small, mid-ocean volcanic and carbonate island in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. Skeletal carbonate eolianite and beach calcarenite on the island are divisible into two formations based on lithostratigraphy. The Searles Point Formation comprises eolianite units bounded by clay-rich paleosols. Pore-filling sparite and microsparite are the dominant cements in these eolianite units, and recrystallised grains are common. Outcrops exhibit karst features such as dolines, caves and subaerially exposed relict speleothems. The Neds Beach Formation overlies the Searles Point Formation and consists of dune and beach units bounded by weakly developed fossil soil horizons. These younger deposits are characterised by grain-contact and meniscus cements, with patchy pore-filling micrite and mirosparite. The calcarenite comprises several disparate successions that contain a record of up to 7 discrete phases of deposition. A chronology is constructed based on U/Th ages of speleothems and corals, TL ages of dune and paleosols, AMS 14C and amino acid racemization (AAR) dating of land snails and AAR whole-rock dating of eolianite. These data indicate dune units and paleosols of the Searles Point Formation were emplaced during oxygen isotope stage (OIS) 7 and earlier in the Middle Pleistocene. Beach units of the Neds Beach Formation were deposited during OIS 5e while dune units were deposited during two major phases, the first coeval with or shortly after the beach units, the second later during OIS 5 (e.g. OIS 5a) when the older dune and beach units were buried.Large-scale exposures and morphostratigraphical features indicate much of the carbonate was emplaced as transverse and climbing dunes, with the sediment source located seaward of and several metres below the present shoreline. The lateral extent and thickness of the eolianite deposits contrast markedly with the relatively small modern dunes. These features indicate that a slight fall (2-10 m) in sea level may be required to mobilise relatively large volumes of sediment onto the island. The stratigraphy of the calcarenite, combined with the shallow depth of the platform surrounding the island (30-50 m present water depth) and the geochronological data, suggest that cycles of carbonate deposition on the island are linked to interglacial and interstadial periods of high or falling sea level

Les mollusques souterrains du rseau karstique de Padirac (Lot, France) et micro-rpartition de Bythinella padiraci Locard, 1903 (Mollusca, Caenogastropoda, Rissooidea), 2004,
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Bichain Jeanmichel, Boudsocq Christian, Pri Vincent
Subterranean molluscs of the karstic network of Padirac (France, Lot) and micro-distribution of Bythinella padiraci Locard, 1903 (Mollusca, Caenogastropoda, Rissooidea) - During a Padirac expedition in November 2003, about ten biological samplings were carried out in the deep karstic network. The first aim of this biospeological mission was to update the data on stygobites molluscs in this subterranean ecosystem. The results show that Bythinella padiraci Locard, 1903, species listed as vulnerable in the 2004 IUCN world Red List of threatened animals, although absent in the upstream part of the Padirac subterranean river, is present in its downstream part after the Dversoir and in the De Joly affluent. An hydrobioid belonging to the genus Islamia was recorded as a component of the stygobiontic biocenose of Padirac as well as Moitessieria rolandiana Bourguignat, 1863. In addition, 3 epigean freshwaters molluscs were observed alive in the deep network, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, Ancylus fluviatilis, Pisidium sp. as well as a terrestrial mollusc, Discus rotundatus.

Unusual injury of the moose's jawbone, found in Franc-losovo brezno" shaft above Glažuta near Ribnica (Slovenia), 2004,
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Jamnik, Pavel

The article deals with unusual bone damage with rounded edges, found on the lower jawbone of a European moose. The remains of its skeleton were discovered by speleologists in the shaft above Glažuta. This damage differs from those, caused by nature in caves and sediments. Small mammals leave different tooth marks when gnawing bones. Maybe the damage was caused by snails? The assumption that snails damage fossil bones was first presented in case of the holes in fossilized Rhinoceros bones from Dolarjeva jama at Logatec.


Timing of Passage Development and Sedimentation at Cave of the Winds, Manitou Springs, Colorado, USA, 2007,
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Luiszer, F. G.

In this study the age of the onset of passage development and the timing of sedimentation in the cave passages at the Cave of the Winds, Manitou Springs, Colorado are determined. The amino acid rations of land snails located in nearby radiometri­cally dated alluvial terraces and an alluvial terrace geomorphi­cally associated with Cave of the Winds were used to construct an aminostratigraphic record. This indicated that the terrace was ~ 2 Ma. The age of the terrace and its geomorphic rela­tion to the Cave of the Winds was use to calibrate the magne­tostratigraphy of a 10 meter thick cave sediment sequence. The results indicated that cave dissolution started ~4.5 Ma and cave clastic sedimentation stopped ~1.5 Ma.


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