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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

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That channel characteristics is hydraulic properties of stream channel [16].?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for pigment (Keyword) returned 59 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 16 to 30 of 59
A cavernicolous asellid of southern Spain: Proasellus solanasi n. sp. (Crustacea, Isopoda, Asellota)., 1972, Henry Jean Paul, Magniez Guy
Description of a new, unpigmented and eyeless species of the genus Proasellus Dudich, from an underground stream in the province of Malaga (Southern Spain). It belongs to the phyletic line which gave rise to the modem epigean water-slater Proasellus rneridianus (Racovitza).

Observations on a darkness-bound Asellus of France: Proasellus racovitzai n.sp. (Crustacea Isopoda Asellota)., 1972, Henry Jean Paul, Magniez Guy
This paper reports the description of a new species of the genus Proasellus Dudich. Proasellus racovitzai n.sp. is widely depigmented. The eyes are reduced. It lives in the underground stream of the Goueil-di-Her cave system (Haute-Garonne, France). The species is an old, endemic form of the phyletic line of the modern epigean species P. meridianus (Racovitza). Chromosome number of the new species: 2n = 22.

Two new cavernicolous Stenasellidae of Central America: Mexistenasellus parzefalli n. sp. Et Mexistenasellus wilkensi n. sp. (Crustacea Isopoda Asellota)., 1972, Magniez Guy
Description of the females of two new species of the family Stenasellidae (anophthalmous and unpigmented Asellota from underground waters). They were found in a little cave of San-Luis Potosi state (Mexico).

Trichonisciidae of the Su Mannau cave, Southwest Sardinia (Crustacea, Isopoda)., 1973, Argano Roberto
Description of three eyeless and apigmented new species of Trichoniscidae which have been found in Su Mannau cave in Sardinia. Two of them belong to the genus Catalauniscus Vandel: Catalauniscus hirundinella n.sp. offering few relationships with the spanish species C. espanoli Vandel, and Catalauniscus puddui n.sp. which has also similar features to an iberian form, C. bolivari Arcangeli. The third (Scotoniscus janas n.sp.) belongs to the endemic genus Scotoniscus Racovitza, until now monospecific and represented by a series of subspecies from the Northern Pyrenees, all nearly related to the specific form S. rnacromelos Racovitza. The discovery of those three new species brings forward additional arguments to the thesis of a Tyrrhenian origin of these taxa of Trichoniscidae.

A new cavericolous Asellid from Central Spain: Bragasellus lagari n.sp. (Crustacea Isopoda Asellota)., 1973, Henry Jean Paul, Magniez Guy
Description of a new, unpigmented and eyeless Asellid, belonging to the Iberian Genus Bragasellus Henry et Magniez, 1968. The new species lives in the underground stream of the Cueva del Tornero (Checa, province of Guadalajara, central Spain).

Ecological and evolutive aspects of the communities of temperate and tropical caves: observations on the biological cycles of some species of Ptomaphagus (Coleoptera Catopidae)., 1973, Sbordoni Marina Cobolli, Sbordoni Valerio
Differences between tropical and temperate cave communities are an important topic in the actual biospeleological thinking. Among the most striking differences is the paucity of terrestrial troglobites in tropical caves. This fact may depend on the higher energy input into tropical caves which lessens the selection pressures for energy-economizing troglobite adaptations. Consequently evolutionary rates would be slowed in tropical caves and, in a date group, troglobites would appear later in such caves than in temperate ones with lower energy input. In order to investigate this point the authors studied the degree of adaptation to the cave environment in two species of Mexican Ptomaphagus which, being phylogenetically related, probably descend from the same epigean ancestor. Among these species the first one, P. troglomexicanus Peck, lives in a typical temperate cave (i.e. cold, high altitude cave, with scarce food supply) in the Sierra de Guatemala (Tamaulipas), the other one, P. spelaeus (Bilimek), populates tropical caves (i.e. warm, lowland cave, with rich food supply) in the State of Guerrero. In addition a comparison is made with P. pius Seidlitz, an epigean species from southern Europe. The results show a striking difference between P. troglomexicanus on a side and the other two species. Differences chiefly concern morphological features such as relative antenna length, structural complexity (i.e. the number of sensilla) of the antenna chemioreceptor organs in the 70, 90, 100 segments, degree of reduction of eye, wing and pigmentation and physiological ones such as the length of the life cycle. The possible causes of these differences are discussed. According to the authors these differences appear due to the different selection pressures acting in the two types of caves. In addition a comparison between the "tropical cave" species, P. spelaeus, with the epigean one, P. pius, does not point out the differences that one could expect by the diverse ecology of these species. These observations support the idea that evolutionary rates in cavernicoles are strongly affected by the ecology of the cave, mainly depending on the degree of energy input, and are poorly consistent with the hypothesis that mutations affecting degenerative processes are selectively neutral.

Trichonisciidae of the Su Mannau cave, Southwest Sardinia (Crustacea, Isopoda)., 1973, Argano Roberto
Description of three eyeless and apigmented new species of Trichoniscidae which have been found in Su Mannau cave in Sardinia. Two of them belong to the genus Catalauniscus Vandel: Catalauniscus hirundinella n.sp. offering few relationships with the spanish species C. espanoli Vandel, and Catalauniscus puddui n.sp. which has also similar features to an iberian form, C. bolivari Arcangeli. The third (Scotoniscus janas n.sp.) belongs to the endemic genus Scotoniscus Racovitza, until now monospecific and represented by a series of subspecies from the Northern Pyrenees, all nearly related to the specific form S. rnacromelos Racovitza. The discovery of those three new species brings forward additional arguments to the thesis of a Tyrrhenian origin of these taxa of Trichoniscidae.

A new cavericolous Asellid from Central Spain: Bragasellus lagari n.sp. (Crustacea Isopoda Asellota)., 1973, Henry Jean Paul, Magniez Guy
Description of a new, unpigmented and eyeless Asellid, belonging to the Iberian Genus Bragasellus Henry et Magniez, 1968. The new species lives in the underground stream of the Cueva del Tornero (Checa, province of Guadalajara, central Spain).

Ecological and evolutive aspects of the communities of temperate and tropical caves: observations on the biological cycles of some species of Ptomaphagus (Coleoptera Catopidae)., 1973, Sbordoni Marina Cobolli, Sbordoni Valerio
Differences between tropical and temperate cave communities are an important topic in the actual biospeleological thinking. Among the most striking differences is the paucity of terrestrial troglobites in tropical caves. This fact may depend on the higher energy input into tropical caves which lessens the selection pressures for energy-economizing troglobite adaptations. Consequently evolutionary rates would be slowed in tropical caves and, in a date group, troglobites would appear later in such caves than in temperate ones with lower energy input. In order to investigate this point the authors studied the degree of adaptation to the cave environment in two species of Mexican Ptomaphagus which, being phylogenetically related, probably descend from the same epigean ancestor. Among these species the first one, P. troglomexicanus Peck, lives in a typical temperate cave (i.e. cold, high altitude cave, with scarce food supply) in the Sierra de Guatemala (Tamaulipas), the other one, P. spelaeus (Bilimek), populates tropical caves (i.e. warm, lowland cave, with rich food supply) in the State of Guerrero. In addition a comparison is made with P. pius Seidlitz, an epigean species from southern Europe. The results show a striking difference between P. troglomexicanus on a side and the other two species. Differences chiefly concern morphological features such as relative antenna length, structural complexity (i.e. the number of sensilla) of the antenna chemioreceptor organs in the 70, 90, 100 segments, degree of reduction of eye, wing and pigmentation and physiological ones such as the length of the life cycle. The possible causes of these differences are discussed. According to the authors these differences appear due to the different selection pressures acting in the two types of caves. In addition a comparison between the "tropical cave" species, P. spelaeus, with the epigean one, P. pius, does not point out the differences that one could expect by the diverse ecology of these species. These observations support the idea that evolutionary rates in cavernicoles are strongly affected by the ecology of the cave, mainly depending on the degree of energy input, and are poorly consistent with the hypothesis that mutations affecting degenerative processes are selectively neutral.

A new interstitial Asellid from southern Spain: Bragasellus boui n.sp. (Crustacea Isopoda Asellota) and some reflections on European Asellidae genera., 1974, Henry Jean Paul, Magniez Guy
Description of a new, unpigmented and eyeless Asellid, belonging to the iberian genus Bragasellus Henry et Magniez, 1968. Eragasellus boui, n.sp., lives on the bottom of a river that is a tributary of Guadalquivir River (Southern Spain). Bragasellus, Proasellus, Stygasellus and Synasellus are four genuine phyletic lines of European Asellidae, all of them independent of each other, and the authors confirm their validity as true genera.

Millipedes in the collection of the AMCS. III. Reddellobus troglobius, n. gen., n. sp., an unusual troglobite from Puebla, Mexico, and other records of the Family Spirobolellidae (Order Spirobolida, Class Diplopoda)., 1975, Causey Nell B.
During the past several years, members of the Association for Mexican Cave Studies have made some surprising additions to the knowledge of the invertebrate fauna of Mexico. None of their finds is more exciting than the species described here, a millipede much larger than the nearest epigean relative in an order outstanding for its scarcity of troglobitic adaptations. The absence of ocelli and the reduction of body pigment in the known epigean typhlobolellids suggest that they are deep humus dwellers preadapted for cave life.

Developmental chronology and evolution of calcium storage and urate containing cells in Niphargus schellenbergi Karaman., 1975, Graf Franois, Michaut Philippe.
The intra-marsupial development of Niphargus schellenbergi is divided into three phases: within the chorion, embryonic intermoult and juvenile intermoult. The disappearance of the chorion divides the first phase from the second. A double exuviation exists between the last two. The chronology of the embryonic development and of the beginning of post-embryonic development is established. On hatching the juvenile N. schellenbergi has one pair of hepatopancreatic caeca. During the first post-embryonic intermoults the ventral hepatopancreatic caeca, posterior caeca and anterior caecum are formed. The relation between posterior caeca and the aorta is described. The study of calcium storage before moulting showed that calcareous concretions located in posterior caeca and midgut have the typical form, volume, quantity and distribution of the species. This calcium accumulation process occurs in the midgut following the first posternbryonic exuviation. It is only when the sixth exuviation is attained that storage in the posterior caeca is similar to the one in adults. The urate containing cells located at the lower face of the pericardial septum begin to accumulate urate spherules 15 days before hatching. They vary in form, volume, localization and composition, and so may be considered as storage sites for urate, pigments and various ions (P, K, Ca, S, Cl, Na, Mg) which are returned to circulation.

Ecological and distributional remarks on unpigmented and anophthalmous Turbellaria Tricladida in Romania., 1978, Botosaneanu Lazare
Twenty-two localities, where unpigmented and mostly blind tricladid turbellarians (Dendrocoelidae and Fonticola) were discovered by the author, are described in more or less detail. These animals are particularly well represented in Romania; the explanation is that they are expansive offshoots of a fauna formerly inhabiting the huge brackish or freshwater lakes which covered most of this country during the Neogene (and especially the Sarmatian). Different species are inhabitants of different particular habitats of the underground water realm, and the author distinguishes between species inhabiting cave waters, typical phreatobionts, hyporheic species and species living in springs or springbrooks. These species are sensitive indicators of even small changes affecting the abiotic or biotic conditions prevailing in their habitats (several examples are offered, especially of competitive exclusion).

The first hyporheic Proasellus from Spain: P. jaloniacus n. sp. (Crustacea Isopoda Asellota)., 1978, Henry Jean Paul, Magniez Guy
This new, anophthalmous and unpigmented species lives in the underflow of Jalon River, Province of Alicante, Southeastern Spain. It belongs to the phyletic line of Proasellus meridianus (Racovitza, 1919).

Bragasellus escolai n.sp., cavernicolous Crustacea Isopoda Asellota from Spain., 1978, Henry Jean Paul, Magniez Guy
The paper gives a description of a new, unpigmented and anophtalmous species of Bragasellus collected in Caldern Cave, Vellia de Carrin, Palencia Province, Northern Spain (hydrographic basin of Douro River).

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