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Enviroscan Ukrainian Institute of Speleology and Karstology


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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That intergranular stress is the stress between grains in a solid matrix [16].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms


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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for transformation (Keyword) returned 55 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 46 to 55 of 55
Improving sinkhole hazard models incorporating magnitudefrequency relationships and nearest neighbor analysis, 2011,
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Galve Jorge P. , Remondo Juan, Gutié, Rrez Francisco

This work presents a methodology for elaborating sinkhole hazard models that incorporate the magnitude and frequency relationships of the subsidence process. The proposed approach has been tested in a sector of the Ebro valley mantled evaporite karst, where sinkholes, largely induced by irrigation practices, have a very high occurrence rate (>50 sinkholes/km2/yr). In this area, covering 10 km2, a total of 943 new cover collapse sinkholes were inventoried in 2005 and 2006. Multiple susceptibility models have been generated analyzing the statistical relationships between the 2005 sinkholes and different sets of variables, including the nearest sinkhole distance. The quantitative evaluation of the prediction capability of these models using the 2006 sinkhole population has allowed the identification of the method and variables that produce the most reliable predictions. The incorporation of the indirect variable nearest sinkhole distance has contributed significantly to increase the quality of the models, despite simplifying the modeling process by using categorical rather than continuous variables. The best susceptibility model, generated with the total sinkhole population and the selected method and variables, has been transformed into a hazard model that provides minimum estimates of the spatial–temporal probability of each pixel to be affected by sinkholes of different diameter ranges. This transformation has been carried out combining two equations derived from the more complete 2006 sinkhole population; one of them expressing the expected spatial–temporal probability of sinkhole occurrence and the other the empirical magnitude and frequency relationships generated for two different types of land surfaces, which control the strength of the surface layer and the size of the sinkholes. The presented method could be applied to predict the spatial–temporal probability of events with different magnitudes related to other geomorphic processes (e.g. landslides).


Structural and host rock controls on the distribution, morphology and mineralogy of speleothems in the Castanar Cave (Spain), 2011,
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Alonsozarza A. M. , Martinperez A. , Martingarcia R. , Gilpena I. , Melendez A. , Martinezflores E. , Hellstrom J. , Munozbarco P.

The Castanar Cave (central western Spain) formed in mixed carbonate-siliciclastic rocks of Neoproterozoic age. The host rock is finely bedded and shows a complex network of folds and fractures, with a prevalent N150E strike. This structure controlled the development and the maze pattern of the cave, as well as its main water routes. The cave formed more than 350 ka ago as the result of both the dissolution of interbedded carbonates and weathering of siliciclastic beds, which also promoted collapse of the overlying host rock. At present it is a totally vadose hypergenic cave, but its initial development could have been phreatic. The cave's speleothems vary widely in their morphology and mineralogy. In general, massive speleothems (stalactites, stalagmites, flowstones, etc.) are associated with the main fractures of the cave and bedding planes. These discontinuities offer a fairly continuous water supply. Other branching, fibrous, mostly aragonite speleothems, commonly occur in the steeper cave walls and were produced by capillary seepage or drip water. Detailed petrographical and isotope analyses indicate that both aragonite and calcite precipitated as primary minerals in the cave waters. Primary calcite precipitated in waters of low magnesium content, whereas aragonite precipitated from magnesium-rich waters. Differences in isotope values for calcite (-5.2‰ for ?18O and -9.6‰ for ?13C) and aragonite (?18O of -4.5‰ and ?13C of -3.5‰ ) can be explained by the fact that the more unstable mineral (aragonite) tends to incorporate the heavier C isotope to stabilize its structure or that aragonite precipitates in heavier waters. Changes in the water supply and the chemistry and instability of aragonite caused: (1) inversion of aragonite to calcite, which led to the transformation of aragonite needles into coarse calcite mosaics, (2) micritization, which appears as films or crusts of powdery, opaque calcite, and (3) dissolution. Dolomite, huntite, magnesite and sepiolite were identified within moonmilk deposits and crusts. Moonmilk occurs as a soft, white powder deposit on different types of speleothems, but mostly on aragonite formations. Huntite and magnesite formed as primary minerals, whereas dolomite arose via the replacement of both huntite and aragonite. Owing to its variety of speleothems and location in an area of scarce karstic features, the Castanar Cave was declared a Natural Monument in 1997 and is presently the target of a protection and research programme. Although the main products formed in the cave and their processes are relatively well known, further radiometric data are needed to better constrain the timing of these processes. For example, it is difficult to understand why some aragonite speleothems around 350 ka old have not yet given way to calcite, which indicates that the environmental setting of the cave is still not fully understood. 


Hydroecogeochemical effects of an epikarst ecosystem: case study of the Nongla Landiantang Spring catchment, 2012,
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Shen L. , Deng X. , Jiang Z. , Li T.

A typical small-scale epikarst ecosystemusually consists of an epikarst zone, soil and vegetation. In this study, to determine the hydro-eco-geochemical effects of an epikarst ecosystem in subtropical humid area, the samples of vegetation, soil, soil microbes, rainfall, throughfall, stem flow, soil water and epikarst springs of Nongla Village, Mashan County, Guangxi in China were collected and analyzed. The research results have shown in the epikarst ecosystem, the conductivity, temporary hardness and total carbon increased continuously in hydro-ecochemical cycle; the vegetation–soil system conducted the transformation and transference of carbon in hydro-ecochemical cycle; the vegetation layer was the major source for organic carbon, while the soil layer was of the important chemical field for the conversion of organic/inorganic carbon and HCO3 –, which would affect the epikarst dynamical system; for most ions, the vegetation layer and shallow soil layer presented more leaching effect than absorption, in contrast, the deep soil layer behaved oppositely. The vegetation layer and shallow soil layer leached ions, and deep soil layer absorbed them. With the plant community presenting in a positive succession, the epikarst ecosystem trended to be stabilized gradually, which made the hydro-eco-geochemical effects to be adjusted and controlled more effectively


Alternative method of analysis of results of 3D terrestrial laser scanning (comment to the article Contribution to a rock block slide examination by a model of mutual transformation of point clouds, Acta Carsologica 38,1), 2012,
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Perne, Matija
The article Konic et al. (2009) describes efforts to find out if the rock block on which the castle of Črni kal is situated slid away from the Kraški rob wall. 3D terrestrial laser scanning has been used to determine positions of many points on both presumed contact surfaces and 12-parameter affine transformation that transforms the cloud of points from one wall into another has been found. The deviation between matching point clouds has been used as a test of the original hypothesis. It has been concluded that the rock block did slide. Some of the data from the article are re-analysed using another numerical method. A 6-parameter translation composed with rotation that best transforms the 12 published points from the rock block wall into their counterparts on the Kraški rob wall is found. The original hypothesis is confirmed and some additional insight into the block slide is revealed.

Major stone forest, litomorphogenesis and development of typical shilin (Yunnan, China), 2012,
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Knez M. , Slabe T. , Liu H.

Major stone forest excellently reveals most characteristics of the formation of the various stone forests. The relatively thick stratification and evenly composed rock clearly display the development of stone forests from subsoil karren. This is evident from the shape of individual parts of the stone forest and the shape and rock relief of pillars that comprise the forest. It is the most typical example of development of karren from subsoil to rain and vegetation exposed stone forest. With it we can compare stone forests shaped on different rock and geomorphological and hydrological conditions. Type of rock is clearly reflected in the intensity of corrosion and erosion and with it in the formation and morphological appearance of individual stone pillars and larger blocks of rock. The rock relief on the pillars in stone forests reveals the interwoven traces of the original shaping of the rock below soil and sediment, of the lowering of the level of soil and sediment, and of the younger but distinct transformation of pillars by rainwater, which naturally dominates on the tops. The exceptional character and picturesqueness of this karst phenomenon is the reason for the successful development of the stone forest as an international tourist attraction that was deservedly placed on the UNESCO world heritage list.


Major stone forest, litomorphogenesis and development of typical shilin (Yunnan, China), 2012,
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Knez Martin, Slabe Tadej, Liu Hong

Major stone forest excellently reveals most characteristics of the formation of the various stone forests. The relatively thick stratification and evenly composed rock clearly display the development of stone forests from subsoil karren. This is evident from the shape of individual parts of the stone forest and the shape and rock relief of pillars that comprise the forest. It is the most typical example of development of karren from subsoil to rain and vegetation exposed stone forest. With it we can compare stone forests shaped on different rock and geomorphological and hydrological conditions. Type of rock is clearly reflected in the intensity of corrosion and erosion and with it in the formation and morphological appearance of individual stone pillars and larger blocks of rock. The rock relief on the pillars in stone forests reveals the interwoven traces of the original shaping of the rock below soil and sediment, of the lowering of the level of soil and sediment, and of the younger but distinct transformation of pillars by rainwater, which naturally dominates on the tops. The exceptional character and picturesqueness of this karst phenomenon is the reason for the successful developmentof the stone forest as an international tourist attraction that was deservedly placed on the UNESCO world heritage list.


A laboratory study of tracer tomography, 2013,
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Brauchler R. , Bhm G. , Leven P. , Dietrich C. , Sauter M.

A tracer tomographic laboratory study was performed with consolidated fractured rock in three-dimensional space. The investigated fractured sandstone sample was characterized by significant matrix permeability. The laboratory transport experiments were conducted using gas-flow and gas-tracer transport techniques that enable the generation of various flow-field patterns via adjustable boundary conditions within a short experimental time period. In total, 72 gas-tracer (helium) tests were performed by systematically changing the injection and monitoring configuration after each test. For the inversion of the tracer breakthrough curves an inversion scheme was applied, based on the transformation of the governing transport equation into a form of the eikonal equation. The reliability of the inversion results was assessed with singular value decomposition of the trajectory density matrix. The applied inversion technique allowed for the three-dimensional reconstruction of the interstitial velocity with a high resolution. The three-dimensional interstitial velocity distribution shows clearly that the transport is dominated by the matrix while the fractures show no apparent influence on the transport responses.


Influence of meteorological variables to water quality in five lakes over the Aggtelek (Hungary) and Slovak karst regions – a case study, 2013,
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Samu Andrea, Csépe Zoltán, Báránykevei Ilona

The main objective of this study is to analyse the effect of tendencies in the meteorological variables on the water quality on the example of five lakes in the Aggtelek and Slovak karst. The data set used eleven water quality parameters (oxygen saturation, chemical oxygen demand, nitrate, nitrite, orthophosphate, total phosphorus, ammonium, pH, conductivity, iron, manganese), as well as daily data of six climatic parameters from the period 2008­2010. A cluster analysis is performed in order to determine the climate impact on the water quality parameters. Furthermore, factor analysis with special transformation, as a novelty in the study, is implemented to find out the weight of the climate parameters as explanatory variables and hence their rank of importance in forming the given water quality parameter as an influencing variable. The study introduces a methodology for analysing the climate impact on the water quality parameters. In order to reduce the number of the water quality parameters, a so called two­stage factor analysis was performed, which is a novel procedure. Application of the two­stage factor analysis involves both benefits and disadvantages. Its benefit is that it substantially reduces the number of resultant variables. In this way, information loss of the retained factors is around 20%. As a result, we received that both positive and negative extreme values of water quality parameters can be associated with weak or breaking­up warm fronts passing through over the region. On the contrary, the role of anticyclones or anticyclone ridge weather situations is supposed to be irrelevant. Unstable and extreme weather conditions act in the direction of breaking up the balance that would support the good water quality. This process does not benefit the water use nor the sensitive karst hydrogeological system


Biological Control on Acid Generation at the Conduit-Bedrock Boundary in Submerged Caves: Quantification through Geochemical Modeling, 2013,
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Herman Janet S. , Hounshell Alexandria G. , Franklin Rima B, Mills Aaron L.

No-mount Cave, located in wekiwa Springs State Park in central Florida, USA, is an aphotic, submerged, freshwater cave in which large colonies of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria live in filamentous microbial mats. Upwardly discharging groundwater enters the cave from the Upper Floridan aquifer, specifically the Eocene-aged Ocala Limestone. we undertook a combined field, laboratory, and modeling study in which we sought to determine the amount of calcite dissolution attributable to the generation of protons by microbially mediated sulfide oxidation. The chemical compositions of groundwater within the limestone formation collected through a newly designed sampling device and of water in the cave conduit were used in geochemical modeling. we used the reaction-path model PHREEqCI to quantify the amount of calcite dissolution expected under various plausible scenarios for mixing of formation water with conduit water and extent of bacterial sulfide oxidation. Laboratory experiments were conducted using flow-through columns packed with crushed limestone from the study site. Replicate columns were eluted with artificial groundwater containing dissolved HS- in the absence of microbial growth. without biologically mediated sulfide oxidation, no measurable calcite dissolution occurred in laboratory experiments and no additional amount of speleogenesis is expected as formation water mixes with conduit water in the field. In contrast, significant calcite dissolution is driven by the protons released in the biological transformation of the aqueous sulfur species. Although a range of results were calculated, a plausible amount of 158 mg Ca2+ released to conduit water per liter of groundwater crossing the formation-conduit boundary and mixing with an equal volume of conduit water was predicted. Our modeling results indicate that significant cave development can be driven by microbially mediated sulfide oxidation under these hydrogeochemical conditions


Clay cortex in epikarst forms as an indicator of age and morphogenesis—case studies from Lublin–Volhynia chalkland (East Poland,West Ukraine), 2014,
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Clay cortex from the contact zone between the host rock (chalk) and infilling deposits were examined in

paleokarst forms (pockets, pipes, and dolines of different age) from the Lublin–Volhynia chalk karst region. In light of the sedimentological and micromorphological analyses, it seems possible to work out a model as the basis for genetic and stratigraphic discussions. (1) Dolineswith the Paleogene orNeogene mineral infills are characterized by (a) homogeneous, residual type of massive clay gradually passing into the chalkmonolith, and at the sametime(b) relatively thickweathered zone. (2) Pipeswith glacigenic mineral infill fromthe Saalian Glacial are characterized by (a) sharp contact between host rock and clay, (b) narrow weathering zone of chalk, (c) diffuse nature of the contact zone between residual clay and mineral infill, and (d) contamination of clay by clastic material. (3) Pocketswith glacigenic mineral infill and traces of theWeichselian periglacial transformation are characterized by (a) strong contamination of chalk by quartz grains, (b) diffuse transition between clay and infill: fromclayey matrixwith single quartz grains (at the contactwith chalk) to clayey coatings and intergranular bridges (in the infill), (c) intensive weathering (cracking) of mineral grains in the infill.


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