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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That lithology is 1. the physical characteristic of a rock, including composition, grain size, texture, degree of cementation (or lithification) and structure, that determine the rock type [9]. 2. the physical properties and aspect of a rock [16].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
See all featured articles from other geoscience journals

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Your search for pigment (Keyword) returned 59 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 46 to 59 of 59
REE3 and Mn2 activated cathodoluminescence in lateglacial and Holocene stalagmites of central Europe: evidence for climatic processes?, 2004, Richter Detlev K. , Gotte Thomas, Niggemann Stefan, Wurth Georg,
Combined visual cathodoluminescence (CL) and spectral analyses of CL reveals periodic enrichments of rare earth elements (REE3) and manganese (Mn2) within the laminations of eight calcitic lateglacial to postglacial stalagmites. In the annual layers, the enrichment of trace elements can be correlated with the autumn/winter laminae, which are strongly pigmented and rich in organic carbon. During the Holocene, they occur especially in the Atlantic stage and in subrecent/recent times. The enrichment of REE3 and Mn reflects times of more intense weathering, which presumably prevailed during the Atlantic warm and humid climate. In subrecent/recent times, especially the last 100 years, these enrichments may have been at least partially anthropogenically induced

Aquifers: the ultimate groundwater-dependent ecosystems, 2006, Humphreys W. F. ,
Australian aquifers support diverse metazoan faunas comprising obligate groundwater inhabitants, largely crustaceans but also including insects, worms, gastropods, mites and fish. They typically comprise short-range endemics, often of relictual lineages and sometimes widely vicariant from their closest relatives. They have been confined to subterranean environments from a range of geological eras and may contain information on the deep history of aquifers. Obligate groundwater fauna ( stygobites) occurs in the void spaces in karst, alluvial and fractured rock aquifers. They have convergent morphologies ( reduction or loss of eyes, pigment, enhanced nonoptic senses, vermiform body form) and depend on energy imported from the surface except in special cases of in situ chemoautotrophic energy fixation. In Australia, many stygofaunas in arid areas occur in brackish to saline waters, although they contain taxa from lineages generally restricted to freshwater systems. They may occur alongside species belonging to taxa considered typical of the marine littoral although far removed in space and time from marine influence. The ecological attributes of stygofauna makes them vulnerable to changes in habitat, which, combined with their taxonomic affinities, makes them a significant issue to biodiversity conservation. The interaction of vegetation and groundwater ecosystems is discussed and, in places, there are conservation issues common to both

A redescription of Ceratophysella lucifuga (Packard) (Collembola, Hypogastruridae) from North American caves, 2007, Skar?y?ski D.
The problematic species Ceratophysella lucifuga (Packard) is redescribed based on topotypes from Wyandotte Cave and specimens from two other caves of the south-central Indiana karst area. This species is characterized by lack of body pigmentation, slightly reduced ocelli, absence of an eversible sac between antennal segments IIIIV, presence of long lateral sensilla in antennal III-organ, postantennal organ with somewhat subdivided posterior lobes, well developed furca and the absence of setae a92 on abdominal tergum V. C. lucifuga is similar to other cavernicolous species of the ceratophysellan lineage grouped in genera Ceratophysella Bo rner and Typhlogastrura Bonet, especially C. proserpinae (Yosii) and C. troglodites (Yosii) from Japan, C. pecki Christiansen and Bellinger from USA and C. kapoviensis Babenko from Russia.

Superficial subterranean habitats gateway to the subterranean realm, 2008, Culver, David C And Tanja Pipan.
Superficial subterranean habitats (SSHs) include small drainages that emerge as seeps (hypotelminorheic), small cavities in the uppermost part of karstified rock (epikarst), talus slopes (milieu souterrain superficiel), and cracks and shallow tubes in lava. They share only two important features with better known subterranean habitats, especially caves they are aphotic environments and they harbour a fauna modified for subterranean life, including species that are eyeless and without pigment. The occupants and environmental characteristics of these habitats are reviewed. The presence of troglomorphic species in SSHs suggests that the absence of light is the primary selective factor in the evolution of the distinctive morphology of cave animals, and that species in SSHs might have given rise to species in deeper subterranean habitats such as caves.

Characterization of cave aerophytic algal communities and effects of irradiance levels on production of pigments, 2008, Mulec J. , Kosi G. , And Vrhovek D.
Aerophytic algae grow on various substrata under favourable ecological conditions. In the illuminated parts of caves, where relative humidity reaches 100%, they colonize sediments, rocky surfaces, and artificial materials. An aerophytic algal community from the cave entrance is composed almost exclusively of cyanobacteria, in contrast to lampenflora where green algae become more dominant. In the later stage of species succession in the lampenflora community, cyanobacteria are more abundant and thus community structure becomes more similar to the community from the cave entrance. Absence of correlation between photon flux density and chlorophyll a concentration indicates that substratum characteristics at the micro level notably influence algal growth. Chl a concentration per surface unit in the case of the epilithic algae from the cave entrance is lower (max. 1.71 mg cm22) compared to that for the lampenflora algae (max. 2.44 mg cm22). At cave temperatures, the light saturation point is quickly reached. At 9.0 uC and frequent low photon flux densities in a cave entrance and around lamps in show caves, biosynthesis of accessory photosynthetic pigments for two typical cave aerophytic organisms, cyanobacterium Chroococcus minutus and green alga Chlorella sp., is considerably elevated.

Ultraviolet Radiation Sensitivity in Cave Bacteria: Evidence of Adaptation to the Subsurface?, 2008, Snider J. R. , Goin C. , Miller R. V. , Boston P. J. , Northup D. E.

We hypothesize that a reduced capacity to withstand or repair cellular damage from ultraviolet radiation may be present in caveadapted microorganisms that never experience such conditions. However, a small number of previous studies have shown that some subsurface bacteria do not show greater sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) than surface bacteria. To estimate UVR sensitivity in cave bacteria, bacterial isolates were collected from Carlsbad Cavern, New Mexico, U.S.A., and percent survival following exposure to various UVC and UVA radiation doses was determined. Cave bacteria from Left Hand Tunnel in Carlsbad Cavern and surface bacteria from soil and rocks above Carlsbad Cavern were grown on low and high nutrient media then exposed to 0, 10,000 and 20,000 μWs/cm2 of UVR in a laboratory biological safety cabinet. Incubations were conducted at 15ºC or 37ºC, in accordance with the isolates’ natural temperature environments. In addition, DNA repair capacity was estimated by exposing the organisms to various doses of UVC radiation and measuring survivability. Gram status and pigmentation also were determined. Results showed that most of the cave isolates were more sensitive to UVR than the surface isolates, but survivability data suggest that cave microbes retain some of their capacity to repair UV-induced DNA damage. Selection appears to have favored bacteria that can survive in this low nutrient environment, while not maintaining (or paying the cost of maintaining) unneeded traits such as UVR resistance. Cave bacteria appear to have maintained DNA repair capacity, most likely because of the need to repair damage to their DNA from other environmental stressors found in caves.


Ultraviolet Radiation Sensitivity in Cave Bacteria: Evidence of Adaptation to the Subsurface?, 2009, Snider J. R. , Goin C. , Miller R. V. , Boston P. J. And Northup D. E.
We hypothesize that a reduced capacity to withstand or repair cellular damage from ultraviolet radiation may be present in caveadapted microorganisms that never experience such conditions. However, a small number of previous studies have shown that some subsurface bacteria do not show greater sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) than surface bacteria. To estimate UVR sensitivity in cave bacteria, bacterial isolates were collected from Carlsbad Cavern, New Mexico, U.S.A., and percent survival following exposure to various UVC and UVA radiation doses was determined. Cave bacteria from Left Hand Tunnel in Carlsbad Cavern and surface bacteria from soil and rocks above Carlsbad Cavern were grown on low and high nutrient media then exposed to 0, 10,000 and 20,000 ?Ws/ cm2 of UVR in a laboratory biological safety cabinet. Incubations were conducted at 15C or 37C, in accordance with the isolates natural temperature environments. In addition, DNA repair capacity was estimated by exposing the organisms to various doses of UVC radiation and measuring survivability. Gram status and pigmentation also were determined. Results showed that most of the cave isolates were more sensitive to UVR than the surface isolates, but survivability data suggest that cave microbes retain some of their capacity to repair UV-induced DNA damage. Selection appears to have favored bacteria that can survive in this low nutrient environment, while not maintaining (or paying the cost of maintaining) unneeded traits such as UVR resistance. Cave bacteria appear to have maintained DNA repair capacity, most likely because of the need to repair damage to their DNA from other environmental stressors found in caves.

Ultraviolet Radiation Sensitivity in Cave Bacteria: Evidence of Adaptation to the Subsurface?, 2009, Snider J. R. , Goin C. , Miller R. V. , Boston P. J. , Northup D. E.

We hypothesize that a reduced capacity to withstand or repair cellular damage from ultraviolet radiation may be present in caveadapted microorganisms that never experience such conditions. However, a small number of previous studies have shown that some subsurface bacteria do not show greater sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) than surface bacteria. To estimate UVR sensitivity in cave bacteria, bacterial isolates were collected from Carlsbad Cavern, New Mexico, U.S.A., and percent survival following exposure to various UVC and UVA radiation doses was determined. Cave bacteria from Left Hand Tunnel in Carlsbad Cavern and surface bacteria from soil and rocks above Carlsbad Cavern were grown on low and high nutrient media then exposed to 0, 10,000 and 20,000 μWs/cm2 of UVR in a laboratory biological safety cabinet. Incubations were conducted at 15ºC or 37ºC, in accordance with the isolates’ natural temperature environments. In addition, DNA repair capacity was estimated by exposing the organisms to various doses of UVC radiation and measuring survivability. Gram status and pigmentation also were determined. Results showed that most of the cave isolates were more sensitive to UVR than the surface isolates, but survivability data suggest that cave microbes retain some of their capacity to repair UV-induced DNA damage. Selection appears to have favored bacteria that can survive in this low nutrient environment, while not maintaining (or paying the cost of maintaining) unneeded traits such as UVR resistance. Cave bacteria appear to have maintained DNA repair capacity, most likely because of the need to repair damage to their DNA from other environmental stressors found in caves.


Zur Mikrobiologie von Bergmilch, 2012, Reitschuler C. , Schwarzenauer T. Lins P. , Wagner A. O. , Sptl C. , Illmer P.
Moonmilk is a plastic mineral formation, which can be found inside cave systems all around the world. These deposits mainly consist of microscopic calcite crystals and show a very high water content. However, the association of microorganisms is remarkable, which seem to play a crucial role in the formation process. The present study applies a combination of culture-based methods and DNA analysis and is to our knowledge the first attempt to investigate this phenomenon in an Alpine cave, in Austria. Central questions include (i) the origin of the occurring microorganisms, (ii) their supply with energy and nutrients, (iii) their role in course of the formation of the deposits, and (iv) their structure and organization. The investigations within the Hundalm Eis- und Tropfsteinhhle in Tyrol revealed that a complex, heterotroph-dominated, psychrophilic microbial com munity, con - sisting of archaea, bacteria and fungi is associated with moonmilk, with partly high microbial abundances. Via living cultivation microorganisms could be proved in all 29 samples, with individual (bacterial) numbers of up to one million per ml moonmilk. The remarkable number of pigmented species could be an indication for the origin from a light-exposed surficial habitat. Molecular biological methods proved that even more organisms inhabit this habitat as was suggested after the culture-based investigations. One million archaea per ml were detected in some samples. The detection of different organic acids partially in appreciable amounts is an indication for biological activity and could also give a hint to the energy and nutrient inputin this system.

Fifty Years of the Hypotelminorheic: What Have We Learned?, 2012, Pipan T. , Fiser C. , Novak T. , Culver D. C.

Originally described by Meštrov in 1962, hypotelminorheic habitats are superficial subterranean drainages, typically less than a meter or so in depth, that emerge at small seepage springs. These are persistent wet spots, typically with blackened leaves in small depressions. There may be no flow during dry periods, but the underlying clay retains water above. They share the landscape with other small bodies of water (močila in Slovenian), not necessarily connected with groundwater. Hypotelminorheic habitats (mezišča in Slovenian) usually harbor a fauna dominated by species adapted to subterranean life, characteristically without eyes or pigment. The basic chemistry and hydrology of the habitat is described as are the basic faunal elements. The habitat is placed in a more general context by reviewing how species invade the habitat, their morphology, and their possible connection to deeper subterranean habitats.


Fifty Years of the Hypotelminorheic: What Have We Learned?, 2012, Pipan Tanja, Fier Cene, Novak Tone, Culver David C.

 

Originally described by Meštrov in 1962, hypotelminorheic habitats are superficial subterranean drainages, typically less than a meter or so in depth, that emerge at small seepage springs. These are persistent wet spots, typically with blackened leaves in small depressions. There may be no flow during dry periods, but the underlying clay retains water above. They share the landscape with other small bodies of water (močila in Slovenian), not necessarily connected with groundwater. Hypotelminorheic habitats (mezišča in Slovenian) usually harbor a fauna dominated by species adapted to subterranean life, characteristically without eyes or pigment. The basic chemistry and hydrology of the habitat is described as are the basic faunal elements. The habitat is placed in a more general context by reviewing how species invade the habitat, their morphology, and their possible connection to deeper subterranean habitats.
 

Forty years of epikarst: what biology have we learned?, 2013, Pipan T. , Culver D. C.

Epikarst is not only an important component of the hydrogeology of karst and an active site of speleogenesis, it is habitat for a number of species adapted to subterranean life. Water in epikarst, with a residence time of days to months, is a highly heterogeneous habitat, and the animals are primarily sampled from continuously sampling dripping water or collecting from residual drip pools. While the subterranean fauna of cracks and crevices has been known for over 100 years, it is only in the past several decades that epikarst has been recognized as a distinct habitat, with reproducing populations of stygobionts. Dissolved organic carbon in epikarst drip water is a primary and sometimes the only source of organic matter for underlying caves, especially if there are not sinking streams that enter the cave. Typical concentrations of organic carbon are 1 mg L-1. The fauna of epikarst is dominated by copepods, but other groups, including some terrestrial taxa, are important in some areas. Most of the diversity is β-diversity (between drips and between caves). In Slovenia, an average of nearly 9 stygobiotic copepod species were found per cave. In studies in Romania and Slovenia, a number of factors have been found to be important in determining species distribution, including ceiling thickness, habitat connectivity and habitat size. In addition to eye and pigment loss, epikarst copepod species may show a number of specializations for life in epikarst, including adaptations to avoid displacement by water flow. Several geoscientists and biologists have challenged the uniqueness and importance of epikarst, but on balance the concept is valid and useful. Fruitful future research directions include development of better sampling techniques, studies to explain differences among nearby epikarst communities, phylogeographic studies, and assessing the possible role of copepods as tracers of vadose water.


Molecular divergence and evolutionary relationships among Aemodogryllinae from Southern China, Laos and Thailand (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae), 2013, Valerio Ketmaier, Claudio Di Russo, Mauro Rampini, Nadine Bernhardt, Ralph Tiedemann, Marina Cobolli

In this study we screened for sequence polymorphisms at one mitochondrial (Cytochrome Oxidase subunit I) and one nuclear (Internal Transcribed Spacer 1) gene 33 populations of the cave cricket generaDiestrammena, ParadiestrammenaEutachycines and Paratachycines from Southern China (three Provinces: Jiangxi, Guangdong and Guizhou), Laos and Thailand. Twenty-five of these populations were assigned to the genusDiestrammena, subgenus Gymnaeta, while the remaining eight belonged to the genera Paradiestrammena (3), Eutachycines (3) and Paratachycines(2). The degree of troglomorphosis varies among them; some populations are blind and depigmented, some have fully developed eyes, while some others show intermediate characteristics. Phylogenetic searches carried out on the two gene partitions separately revealed multiple cases of incongruence but only three of them were statistically significant and were hence removed from the subsequent analyses based on the combined data set. Our data do not support Diestrammena as monophyletic while representatives of ParadiestrammenaEutachycines and Paratachycineswere clustered together; the validity of some nominal species was confirmed molecularly but we also revealed a large number of deeply divergent lineages. Populations with the same degree of troglomorphosis do not cluster together. We identified five major clades; divergence among them (and in a few circumstances also within them) is always higher than the DNA barcode threshold for intraspecific comparisons in insects. In two circumstances, the same clades (III and V) are co-distributed in geographically distinct areas (Provinces). This geographical distribution might be explained by envisioning an evolutionary scenario based on zones of secondary admixture following epigean dispersal among lineages that diverged in allopatry.


Karst environment, 2016, Culver D. C.

Karst environments can be grouped into three broad categories, based on their vertical position in the landscape. There are surface habitats, ones exposed to light; there are shallow subterranean (aphotic) habitats oft en with small to intermediate sized spaces; there are deep subterranean habitats (caves) with large sized spaces. Faunal records are most complete for caves, and on a global basis, more than 10,000 species are limited to this habitat. Hundreds of other species, especially bats, depend on caves for some part of their life cycle. A large, but most unknown number of species are limited to shallow subterranean habitats in karst, such as epikarst and the milieu souterrain superficiel. Species in both these categories of habitats typically show a number of morphological adaptations for life in darkness, including loss of eyes and pigment, and elaboration of extra-optic sensory structures. Surface habitats, such as sinkholes, karst springs, thin soils, and rock faces, are habitats, but not always recognized as karst habitats. Both aphotic karst habitats and twilight habitats (such as open air pits) may serve as important temporary refuges for organisms avoiding temperature extremes on the surface.


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